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Thank you for this. I just had to enable the Oppo in the Roon settings duh on my part. I have it working now. It sounds different than my Sotm SMS 200 ultra. The ultra has more dynamics. The Oppo a bit smoother. Or laid back. So good mastered music goes through the Sotm marginal goes through the Oppo. Bad gets shut off quickly.
All the 205 needs to be is on your network and having the latest firmware. To set Roon up, Roon needs what it calls a Core, that is a server that has direct access to your music files. The Core can either be a standalone program on a separate server without a user interface, or you can do it with a combo UI + core version of the program. But Roon can be configured from any client...PC, Mac, Android, iOS, it doesn't matter. You go into the "Audio" setting and you can control every different place on your network that has what Roon calls an Endpoint. The machine the Core or main application can be a an endpoint (any machine running Roon on your network can be an endpoint). There are network players and DACs that has Roon's software built in, like the Oppo 205 & 203. All you have to do is activate the endpoint and you can use the preferences to make any tweaks you like. Other endpoints can be Airplay devices (Airport Express, compatible receivers, etc) and Squeezeboxes.

There are a couple of limitations using a 205/203 as a networked Roon endpoint. The Roon software on the 205/203 cannot do native DSD so Roon will automatically convert the song to whatever the endpoint can handle. Roon is pretty good about the conversion process and all the steps it does. It also cannot do multichannel music through Roon directly to the Oppo (and will downconvert to 2 channel automatically).

In order to get around the DSD limitations, I ran Roon on an old Mac connected to the USB DAC port on my 205. But that may be overkill for you.
Ron
 

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Does anyone have a wish list for the next firmware update?

Or, are there any bugs in the current firmware that people hope will be fixed?
 

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Hi All,

I've had my Oppo 203 for almost a year now and just recently began experiencing a strange issue where the disc tray wont open.

Neither the remote nor the button on the unit will open the tray. I need to fully unplug the Oppo and plug it back in. However, once I go to use it again, the tray wont open.

What are some recommended courses of action here? as I said I have already done numerous "power" resets by unplugging the power cord. The tray also isn't stuck, so I can't assume its a mechanical issue.
 

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Thanks for the clarification. I do not use Tidal, Roon or anything else streaming DSD128 and 24/192 WAV files over my network directly to the 205. I also use a USB drive and do have JRiver which I play from my laptop to the USB DAC input. They all sound awesome to me.
I stayed away from Roon, partially because I didn't want to spend the money but also most people seem to really love it and I wasn't interested in redoing my entire household music media consumption. But I finally decided to take the two month free trial Oppo code...and within two days I wound up redoing my entire home's music media platform and have not looked back since. I use the product nearly every day. It's not perfect but it's damn good. And I just paid for the service today since my trial has now expired.
 

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Hi All,

I've had my Oppo 203 for almost a year now and just recently began experiencing a strange issue where the disc tray wont open.

Neither the remote nor the button on the unit will open the tray. I need to fully unplug the Oppo and plug it back in. However, once I go to use it again, the tray wont open.

What are some recommended courses of action here? as I said I have already done numerous "power" resets by unplugging the power cord. The tray also isn't stuck, so I can't assume its a mechanical issue.
Get in touch with OPPO Tech Support. Your player is still under Warranty (2 years).
—Bob
 

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That would be a true statement. Those that said they registered interest on May 9th, actually did it back in April and confirmed on May 9th. My e-mail to Oppo happened middle of April, but was confirmed on May 9th. Way it looks Oppo may not even fill all of the April requests.

I may still get an offer to purchase. I may however, pass. Have 2 new 203's and the Panasonic UB9000 looks interesting. Already reserved one with Robert at Value Electronics.


I pre ordered then bought the 205 when it first came out. I just got an e-mail today saying I could purchase another 205 which I just did.....

(edit) I believe I registered in April and verified in May...
 

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You advertising a sale??

No. I really like the 205. I will just put the new one away for a few years then maby sell the old one....

I just wish OPPO was still going to be making them in the future (new models). With two of them I should be set for a number of years...

(edit) I thought I was out of luck ever being able to get a new one again at list price. Then the e-mail showed up....

Still hoping they decide in the future to start making players again....
 

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From a Stereophile Review about the UDP-205:

"In fact, the UDP-205 can subtly shape the sound to the user's taste with the choice of filter characteristics used in the conversion of digital to analog. On the Audio Processing page of the setup menu is an option called Filter Characteristics. I've listed the seven selections below, along with comments from Oppo and from AKM (footnote 3): Brick Wall ("Usually good for measurement results, not so good for listening"); Corrected Mini Phase Fast ("Low dispersion, Harmonic Sound"); Apodizing Fast ("Some listeners like this due to the elimination of so called 'pre-ringing'"); Mini Phase Slow ("Short Delay Slow Rolloff, Acoustic Tone"); Mini Phase Fast–"Default" ("Short Delay Sharp Rolloff, Acoustic Sound"); Linear Phase Slow ("Slow Rolloff, Traditional Tone"); Linear Phase Fast ("Sharp Rolloff, Traditional Sound").

According to AKM, Mini Phase Fast, the default filter, should "enhance bass sound," and it did—but I found the Apodizing Fast filter had less edge and so was more to my liking. Each of the others, with the possible exception of Brick Wall, had both positive and negative characteristics, and I can imagine that other listeners would make choices different from mine. However, I've played with filters before and have found them bewildering: Compulsive comparing does not lead to certainty. I advise you to choose two or three favorite tracks for your initial trials, listen, choose, live with your choice, and don't revisit the issue unless something changes in your room or system—or mind—that dictates you must."

MY QUESTION: Has anybody messed with these settings? Seems entirely subjective and could change with your moods, day by day. Just wondering thanks.
 

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I received my 205 in the first round in late June. The box also includes the QA PASSED sticker.

I was curious and just checked. I have the "QA Pass" sticker on my carton from April of 2017....
 

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From a Stereophile Review about the UDP-205:

"In fact, the UDP-205 can subtly shape the sound to the user's taste with the choice of filter characteristics used in the conversion of digital to analog. On the Audio Processing page of the setup menu is an option called Filter Characteristics. I've listed the seven selections below, along with comments from Oppo and from AKM (footnote 3): Brick Wall ("Usually good for measurement results, not so good for listening"); Corrected Mini Phase Fast ("Low dispersion, Harmonic Sound"); Apodizing Fast ("Some listeners like this due to the elimination of so called 'pre-ringing'"); Mini Phase Slow ("Short Delay Slow Rolloff, Acoustic Tone"); Mini Phase Fast–"Default" ("Short Delay Sharp Rolloff, Acoustic Sound"); Linear Phase Slow ("Slow Rolloff, Traditional Tone"); Linear Phase Fast ("Sharp Rolloff, Traditional Sound").

According to AKM, Mini Phase Fast, the default filter, should "enhance bass sound," and it did—but I found the Apodizing Fast filter had less edge and so was more to my liking. Each of the others, with the possible exception of Brick Wall, had both positive and negative characteristics, and I can imagine that other listeners would make choices different from mine. However, I've played with filters before and have found them bewildering: Compulsive comparing does not lead to certainty. I advise you to choose two or three favorite tracks for your initial trials, listen, choose, live with your choice, and don't revisit the issue unless something changes in your room or system—or mind—that dictates you must."

MY QUESTION: Has anybody messed with these settings? Seems entirely subjective and could change with your moods, day by day. Just wondering thanks.
It is indeed largely a matter of taste. The differences are subtle, so leaving it on the default works just fine for most folks.
—Bob
 

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It is indeed largely a matter of taste. The differences are subtle, so leaving it on the default works just fine for most folks.
—Bob
When I first received the OPPO 205 last year I experimented with the filters and ended up with Apodizing Fast filter. At that time I had not read about the characteristics of each so my choice was purely based upon my sound perception. I have not changed the setting since my initial experiments and set up. As I recall I used the Neil Young at Massy Hall recording do the listening tests. I also used Arron Copeland Appliciation Suite by LSO to experience orchestral music.
 

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I experimented with the filters also. I believe I chose appodizing fast as well. But have since returned it back to the default to experiment. I thought it was a bit smoother on appodizing fast. But I may be wrong. It definitely sounds a tiny bit different. It is definitely not huge or even moderate. It is very subtle. And in a double blind I know I would fail miserably. So don't even ask. Lol

Ron
 

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Roon is a little expensive but it works great. And you get a free two month trial being an Oppo owner.
How does one activate this two-month trial? I looked on their website and all I saw was a 14-day free trial. Thanks in advance.
 

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Invite received today

Hi, I just got an order invite for a 205 and ordered. I unfortunately can't recall when I signed up, and searching my email for the confirmation is coming up empty. I know I got one of the 'confirm your email' emails, but my system seems to have purged everything. I do know that I didn't immediately sign up for the wait list.
Sorry I can't help anyone figure out timing, but I am posting to let others know that they are still coming out, and even if you weren't very early on there is still hope.
Mark
 

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I experimented with the filters also. I believe I chose appodizing fast as well. But have since returned it back to the default to experiment. I thought it was a bit smoother on appodizing fast. But I may be wrong. It definitely sounds a tiny bit different. It is definitely not huge or even moderate. It is very subtle. And in a double blind I know I would fail miserably. So don't even ask. Lol

Ron
Well it appears that including the stereophile critic, three persons indicate a preference to some extent for appodizing fast. It will be interesting to get additional feedback on this question. Thanks for the response. I have yet to set up my 205 to check this out.
 

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From a Stereophile Review about the UDP-205:

"In fact, the UDP-205 can subtly shape the sound to the user's taste with the choice of filter characteristics used in the conversion of digital to analog. On the Audio Processing page of the setup menu is an option called Filter Characteristics. I've listed the seven selections below, along with comments from Oppo and from AKM (footnote 3): Brick Wall ("Usually good for measurement results, not so good for listening"); Corrected Mini Phase Fast ("Low dispersion, Harmonic Sound"); Apodizing Fast ("Some listeners like this due to the elimination of so called 'pre-ringing'"); Mini Phase Slow ("Short Delay Slow Rolloff, Acoustic Tone"); Mini Phase Fast–"Default" ("Short Delay Sharp Rolloff, Acoustic Sound"); Linear Phase Slow ("Slow Rolloff, Traditional Tone"); Linear Phase Fast ("Sharp Rolloff, Traditional Sound").

According to AKM, Mini Phase Fast, the default filter, should "enhance bass sound," and it did—but I found the Apodizing Fast filter had less edge and so was more to my liking. Each of the others, with the possible exception of Brick Wall, had both positive and negative characteristics, and I can imagine that other listeners would make choices different from mine. However, I've played with filters before and have found them bewildering: Compulsive comparing does not lead to certainty. I advise you to choose two or three favorite tracks for your initial trials, listen, choose, live with your choice, and don't revisit the issue unless something changes in your room or system—or mind—that dictates you must."

MY QUESTION: Has anybody messed with these settings? Seems entirely subjective and could change with your moods, day by day. Just wondering thanks.
Doesn't the 205 use ESS and not AKM DAC? Or does it use both
 

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I played around with the filters when I first got the 205. I thought I was using the default setting Mini Phase Fast. Just checked I am using the appodizing fast. To be honest I can't tell much of a difference between the two. I used to have a KRELL SACD player until the transport died. That had 4 filters. There was a lot bigger difference switching between them....


I found this. I had copied it May 5th 2017. Don't remember where I got it from. It was probably from a post in here some-where....


>>>>First, all of this "filtering" - DACs require it. Don't ask why, it just is. Or read the articles - it's ALL in there & it's AWESOME info. The 7 filter settings are variations of the required DAC filtering. These variations are all about tweaking the sound to mitigate distortions that contribute to that "digital sound" everyone hates. Except me. I also like circus peanut marshmallow & peeps.

Now that you know from where I am coming... here's my take on all of it.

LINEAR VS MINIMUM PHASE: "linearity" is all about frequency dispersion - or delay, which is time distortion. Linearity (linear filter) means all frequencies share equal delay. No dispersion, or time distortion. Seemingly desirable, right? Linear implies "correct", right? Well... maybe yes & probably no.

Scientifical reasons beyond mere mortal comprehension (means I can't explain it) say that phase linearity introduces a lot of pre-ringing. Pre-ringing is perceived as unnatural, "off" sound - distortion - because it's not how sound occurs & our brains are wired to hear how sound naturally occurs: there is a cause & there is a resulting sound. Pre-ringing - sound is produced before it's supposed to be. Imagine if you heard a bell begin to peal before it is struck, then it is struck & you hear the intended sound. It's a head-scratcher your brain tells you is "wrong".

Some genius figured out that pre-ringing can be mitigated by introducing "phase" distortion - frequency dispersion/delay. But, too much dispersion is not desirable because unwanted, additional artifacts can occur. So we have minimum phase filtering.

Linear: no frequency dispersion (delay) but inherent pre-ringing and post-ringing.
Minimum Phase: introduces a small amount of frequency dispersion (delay = distortion) to mitigate pre-ringing and some but not all post-ringing.

Post-ringing... sonic artifacts that occur (for scientological reasons) after the desired sound - think... echos. This is natural; we expect sounds to "echo" & so this type of distortion is less objectionable, but only to a point. Too much "echo" sounds unnatural, so post-ringing needs to be controlled, too. We don't want to hear that bell ring on forever, right? Which brings us to....

SLOW VS FAST ROLL-OFF:

NOTE: We're not talking major slope differences here when fast/slow roll off is used to describe these filters; it's a relative measurement. Doesn't take much to tweak these unwanted bugs out of the system (based on what I've read). A -6dB slope is shallower than a -3dB slope, but is still steep/fast. And these distortions are barely audible; the brain just about perceives them as off-putting sound. Maybe... someone else's brain might tell him "sounds awesome, man!" (Probably also tells him baby corn & water chestnuts are delicious.)

Steep (or fast) slope/roll-off means frequencies are attenuated quickly/sharply at the cut-off point. It's as if a... brick wall (!) was in the way, not letting you hear the frequencies beyond the cut off. A "brickwall" filter has a very steep (fast) slope at its cut off frequency.

Shallow (or slow) roll off is the opposite. Frequencies are slowly/less sharply attenuated beyond the cut-off point. So instead of a solid brick wall, we have a slightly open door. Some frequencies on the other side of the wall will now come through that door - which ones & how loud they are depends on how far that door is open (how steep or shallow the slope or roll off is).

Steeper roll off, fewer frequencies pass & you have to be closer to the brick wall to hear them. Shallower roll off, more frequencies pass & you can get farther & farther away from the brick wall & still hear them.

Open the door too much (roll off is too slow) you defeat the purpose of the necessary filter (you reintroduce the unwanted frequencies & distortions!) Once again, it's all about compromise.

So, if distortion is more likely to occur in ultra-sonic frequencies, you might think a steep (fast) roll of right at say, 20khz is ideal - just flat-out get rid of (stop, or cut off) frequencies we can't hear, and also get rid of this nasty distortion. Well, what I've read seems to indicate steep slope = introduction of the dreaded "digital harshness"! (Booga booga! Scary!)

Slow/shallow roll off softens that digital harshness. It also mitigates post-ringing.

And now you're thinking - just make & only use the slowest roll-off, stupid!

NOPE!

Here's why: slow/shallow roll off introduces aliasing, which is ANOTHER type of distortion. Hence we have...

APODIZING: this hocus-pocus mitigates aliasing! So sayeth the articles - and they don't say much more about apodizing, except that it means "cut off at the foot". So, cut off your foot & your music will sound better.

If I was to draw a (feeble) conclusion based on everything I've read so far, theoretically speaking, we would most want Santa to bring us good little boys and girls a:

MINIMUM PHASE (to "best" reduce pre-ringing),
SLOW ROLL OFF (to "best" reduce post-ringing & eliminate "digital harshness"),
APODIZING (to "best" reduce the aliasing distortion)
filter. And a puppy.

Assuming all of that is "the best". What if it's not for you? What if they don't even make a mini-phase, slow roll off, apodizing filter so all we get is a fast one? I dunno these answers, man!

That's just me drawing a conclusion for poops & gigs. I haven't done any listening tests because . And for god's sakes - don't write Oppo asking if the 205's apodizing filter is linear or mini-phase & why it's not slow roll off "because some mo in the forum said..."

Now, if I was to make a guess like I learnt somefin, based solely on what I've read, I would put my money on MY final A/B comparison of the best of the 7 to be between the Fast Apodizing vs Minimum Phase Slow filters. I would also bet it's a toss up over which one I liked better. (It's circus peanuts.)

Now go & read the articles - I promise, you will enjoy them & learn something pretty cool! Heck, you might even get to tell me I am totally wrong.

Nerd.

Jim

ARTICLE #1 :

This first link is to an Ayre white-paper on DAC filters & various characteristics, and even their effects (to a point). It's written plainly & simply.

http://www.ayre.com/white_papers/Ayr...hite_Paper.pdf

Based on what I read, (I think) this is how the article's filter descriptions match up with the 205's. Note that the Ayre article only addresses 4 filter characteristics.

• Brick Wall – the 1st filter characteristic described in the Ayre article. After all of my reading, I understand this filter to be the "original" filter used way back when dinosaurs roamed da erf & listened to Sony Discmans (men?). And, it is why folks lamented the "digital sound".
• Corrected Mini Phase Fast – Not described in the Ayre article.
• Apodizing Fast – This may be the 3rd filter described in the Ayre article, but hard to say because Oppo doesn't mention linear or minimum phase.
• Mini Phase Slow – This is the 4th filter described in the Ayre article & the one they regard, and the majority of their beta-testers regarded, as the most musical/best sounding.
• Mini Phase Fast (default) – Not described in the Ayre article.
• Linear Phase Slow – This is the 2nd filter described in the Ayre article.
• Linear Phase Fast – Not described in the Ayre article.

ARTICLE #2 :

The best, most informative article that explains exactly why DACs need filters & even described the effects of 7 very similar to the 205's "filter characteristics". It doesn't tell you what's right or wrong, or when to use what filter - there is no such guidance, just like how there are no unicorns. It's a longer read, a bit more "scientific", but still easy. I'm an idiot & I think I got it. Read it start to finish, skip nothing & it will definitely lift the veil.

And it's specific to an ESS SABRE DAC (!!) but a DAC from 2012: http://www.audiostream.com/content/w...ce-labs-tech-0

Here is how I think its filter descriptions match up to the 205's settings:

• Brick Wall – filter #1 description most likely. I say that because the article refers to it as the "classic", which could mean it's akin to the original "brickwall" filter.
• Corrected Mini Phase Fast – no exact match in the article, could be #3 .
• Apodizing Fast – filter #5 description (preferred by beta-testers, according to the article).
• Mini Phase Slow – filter description #4 (likely)
• Mini Phase Fast (default) – likely description #3 , but no exact match in the article.
• Linear Phase Slow – filter description #7 ; could also be #2 .
• Linear Phase Fast – filter description #6 ; could be #1 .

ARTICLE #3 :

This last one is already written plainly & is helpful. I found it added to my understanding of what all of the mumbo-jumbo means.

hifiduino.blogspot.com/2009/05/wm8741-digital-filters.html
 

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Does anyone have a wish list for the next firmware update?

Or, are there any bugs in the current firmware that people hope will be fixed?
Wish list: Yes, and I have contacted OPPO (and they said they would forward it).

As far as I know, the current volume control is in 0.5 dB steps, so 100 steps is 50 dB of adjustment range. 70 or 80 dB is more typical and allows more adjustment at the lower levels. So I asked OPPO if they would consider a variable step - 0.5 dB at the lower levels and 1 dB/step at the louder levels, still 100 steps. 1 dB /step was the original setting I think, but 100 dB range is more than needed.
 
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