AVS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 5761 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
So now that you actually have the TV, any word on the specs? I know I've been waiting for final word regarding HDMI 2.0 @ 18Gbps / HDCP 2.2. 4:4:4 support has been confirmed by the manual. I'm also wondering if the ethernet port is 100Mb or 1000Mb? Do we have Wireless AC? Or just N?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Thread should be renamed once the 65" is available.
And yeah, some more information that LG is unwilling to spill would be very welcome such as HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, input lag etc.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
425 Posts
Mine arrives next week. I'm not thrilled with the contents of the instruction manual, it is comically terse. Not at all what you expect from a TV that costs $5.5K. But somehow, exactly what I expected from LG. They seem to be in way over their heads here, somehow managing to profitably manufacture OLED panels at high yields but without the years of experience making quality displays. They've always been that _other_ guy in the group of 3 that still manufactured plasma screens.

The manual states IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n, so I am guessing that is a definitive no on AC... but I suspect it won't matter _too_ much, streaming 4K video doesn't require that much bandwidth. 802.11n alone offers more bandwidth than most residential homes can dream of getting on their Internet connection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
hrmm.. I'm tempted on getting this (55 4k) for a computer monitor.. hrmm..


yeah.. for a computer (gaming) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
The manual states IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n, so I am guessing that is a definitive no on AC... but I suspect it won't matter _too_ much, streaming 4K video doesn't require that much bandwidth. 802.11n alone offers more bandwidth than most residential homes can dream of getting on their Internet connection.
How do you figure? I always saw 30Mbps tops on N standing right next to the router both at home and at work on my phone. On AC, I can pull the full 65Mbps I get anywhere in the house. We're talking to device here... not total, theoretical, in the lab bandwidth. Also, remember, the routers and clients available for a PC / laptop are a different class then whats in a phone / TV / bluray player, etc. Ones in the TV aren't going to support all the fancy stuff like channel bonding and wide channels to get that supposed 600Mbps LOL...

Also, if they put an N radio in the TV, they likely put a 100Mb port on there as well. Now I only have 65Mbps down, but a few folks on here are definitely > 100Mbps down.

I would certainly expect AC on a $5500 TV since I got it on my $800 phone.

Whats amazing is that some of the LG OLEDs state AC support in the manual.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
425 Posts
How do you figure? I always saw 30Mbps tops on N standing right next to the router both at home and at work on my phone. On AC, I can pull the full 65Mbps I get anywhere in the house. We're talking to device here... not total, theoretical, in the lab bandwidth. Also, remember, the routers and clients available for a PC / laptop are a different class then whats in a phone / TV / bluray player, etc. Ones in the TV aren't going to support all the fancy stuff like channel bonding and wide channels to get that supposed 600Mbps LOL...

Also, if they put an N radio in the TV, they likely put a 100Mb port on there as well. Now I only have 65Mbps down, but a few folks on here are definitely > 100Mbps down.
How do I figure? The only thing you'd need AC for is in-home streaming. 802.11N already offers more bandwidth than a residential Internet connection, so unless you're streaming 4K video from your own cloud server, it's kind of moot.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
27,979 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
hrmm.. I'm tempted on getting this (55 4k) for a computer monitor.. hrmm..
yeah.. for a computer (gaming) :)
The review Chad and I will be doing is hosted by a client who will be using his unit for gaming / computer use. We may even be doing a imput lag test ;) We will see how everything goes.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
How do I figure? The only thing you'd need AC for is in-home streaming. 802.11N already offers more bandwidth than a residential Internet connection, so unless you're streaming 4K video from your own cloud server, it's kind of moot.
Huh? I just gave you an example of where it doesn't.


I am a resident and thus I have a residential internet connection. My residential internet connection is 65Mbps down. A wireless N device on my network only gets about 30Mbps. A wireless AC device can pull the full 65Mbps.


You are majorly misunderstanding what the "600Mbps" on the box of your router means.


a) about 50% of that goes to wireless overhead and can't be used by your device.
b) that speed is the RAW rating only when bonding 4 spatial streams -- the single channel N in a TV is only rated for 150Mbps raw.
c) even if you were getting > 100Mbps on your network, you would then be throttled by the 100Mbps port on your TV or BluRay player.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
My N devices get only a fraction of what my AC devices do in the same spot when streaming from the Internet.
Yeah man... Obviously :). That's the whole point of AC. I'm thinking Kaldaien is mixing up raw vs usable bandwidth and B's and b's :). I can't tell you how many people I've seen claim 600Mbps wireless is equal to 600 / 8 = 75MB/s :rolleyes:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
The review Chad and I will be doing is hosted by a client who will be using his unit for gaming / computer use. We may even be doing a imput lag test ;) We will see how everything goes.....


that client is a friend of mine. (or at least you have a few crazy clients are want this monitor for a computer screen - a 4k screen for console gaming is pointless.) I told him he should get the 65" instead because if IR is an issue for using it as a desktop he can always fall back to using it as a TV :) (55" is to small main TV imo). But i'm really want to see how it works out. I wouldn't mind a minor curve on a monitor as one sits right in front of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
Any rough time frame on this review? I'd certainly be interested in an input lag test as well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
425 Posts
Huh? I just gave you an example of where it doesn't.


I am a resident and thus I have a residential internet connection. My residential internet connection is 65Mbps down. A wireless N device on my network only gets about 30Mbps. A wireless AC device can pull the full 65Mbps.


You are majorly misunderstanding what the "600Mbps" on the box of your router means.


a) about 50% of that goes to wireless overhead and can't be used by your device.
b) that speed is the RAW rating only when bonding 4 spatial streams -- the single channel N in a TV is only rated for 150Mbps raw.
c) even if you were getting > 100Mbps on your network, you would then be throttled by the 100Mbps port on your TV or BluRay player.
No, this is not the case at all. My 2010 MacBook Pro with only 802.11N connects to my WiFi network @240 Mbit/sec from the other end of the house. My 2014 MacBook Pro with Wireless AC connects to the same network at between 700 and 900 Mbit/sec from the same location.

Even though the 802.11N connection on my 2010 MacBook Pro is significantly slower it is still almost 5x my Internet bandwidth, so the bottleneck on an 802.11N network is going to be Internet and not local connection speed. You will not get any improvement by widening the local connection if you're trying to squeeze a residential Internet connection through it. Nobody in a residential environment has an Internet connection > 240 Mbit/sec and that will be continue to be true long after the pixels on this OLED TV burn out. So, unless you have a local NAS server that you stream 4K video from, 802.11n is plenty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
No, this is not the case at all. My 2010 MacBook Pro with only 802.11N connects to my WiFi network @240 Mbit/sec from the other end of the house. My 2014 MacBook Pro with Wireless AC connects to the same network at between 700 and 900 Mbit/sec from the same location.
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:...


MacBook Pro's support channel bonding (up to 3 streams I believe).


TVs, AVRs, BluRay players, etc. only support single streams and can only do 150Mbps no matter what your router says on the box.


Do you have an iPhone 5 (or earlier)? Go tell me how fast that is on your network :). iPhone's are single stream devices.


Or if you have an iPhone 6, go tell me how fast that is when compared to your AC MacBook :).


Most devices do NOT support channel bonding since it requires multiple antennas.


You just happened to pick the one device that supports channel bonding to make a meaningless example.


By the way... what are you talking about on your other point too?


Most of the big ISP have announced plans to deliver GigaBit internet to the home in 2015 / 2016. There are at LEAST a dozen areas in the country where you can get GigaBit internet to the home for < $100.


HINT: Wireless AC doesn't have the capability to go at GigaBit speeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
I'm curious about the pixel fill factor (or is it officially Pixel Aperture now since Apple used that term? :))

That along with lag input and other factors will decide how good it is for up close PC monitor use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
bout 2 weeks.....
I can't wait reading this review :)

My 65eg960v is supposed to arrive this month but by this time, I'll have to chose between keeping the 65eg960v or switching for the 65js9500. I'm still hesitating because of the HDR display ability which won't be possible with the 65eg960v as far as it is known.

It's hard to choose between infinite contrast and complete future proof UHD blu-ray.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
702 Posts
1 - 20 of 5761 Posts
Top