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Quote:
Originally Posted by DigaDo /forum/post/17761969


If the VCR has only one audio output, connect that output to the white (left) cable running between the VCR and the DVD recorder. The red cable is not used when the VCR has only a mono output.

Listen to DigaDo, he's right about this! I filled up a whole DVD once -- perfectly dubbed video-- and all with no sound on the whole thing, because I used the red cable on a mono output playback deck. DOOHH! Guess it's all part of the learning curve we go through with new stuff.


Actually, just by virtue of not dying, my EZ-485V has outperformed its late predecessor, an RCA unit. The RCA I got at Christmas one year ago.. wally world for 400 bucks. It was a combo VHS/DVR/Tuner, and I was excited to start copying VHS to DVD on it. That unit always ran hot. No fan in that unit. It felt hot to the touch on the case, and every disk and tape I'd take out of it, felt hot. And eventually one day about 3 months later, it wouldn't boot up. Wouldn't even eject my disk. Before sending it off to repair, I opened it to get my disk out. Didn't take much examination to see a burned up resistor on the power supply board. Thought about just fixing it myself... but talked myself out of that because 'that's what warranties are for', I kept saying. So I sent it off to their repair depot... waited... waited... and waited. Called them up to ask what's going on and they're like Huh? What unit?? They had freekin LOST my unit. More waiting and waiting. More calls. They finally, grudgingly comp'ed me about half what I paid for it. VERY disappointed with RCA. Both Product and Service.


So with this $200 refund in hand, I was flipping through a catalog from a place called Heartland America. They had a photo of this nice looking unit, the EZ48... reconditioned, discounted price. Hmmm. Wow, look at those features. Wow, look at that price... OK, bang, I'm buying it. And our relationship has been "happily ever after". Wish I had access to find out what the original problem or complaint had been. I'm not sure if this unit got refurbished by Panny directly, or by Julio in his garage. But it has done all that I've asked of it so far.


And I haven't actually demanded very much from my EZ48 so far. For example, I've never have had it hooked up yet to an antenna or cable. So none of those tuner-related issues have shown up for me. In fact, this unit's tuner could be dead and I wouldn't even know it. All I've done with it so far is watched VHS tapes, watched DVD's, and copied a huge pile of VHS to DVD (both with the internal VHS deck, and via an external VHS deck for CP'd tapes). Output via RF to a little 13" Sony, all easy cheesy stuff, no biggie.


And the PQ has been great in 2hr and 4hr mode. At 8hr mode, I can begin to see some granulation. Not objectionable, just noticable. I've been using Memorex 16x DVD-R disks. I know Memorex isn't favored by many in this forum, but so far in 2 spindles of disks, no problems. I've just been educated by reading on here how Panny favors the TaiyoYuden 8x disks, so my next spindle ordered will be those. How are they better than Memorex?


I've learned here that 8x requires less power from the laser than 16x, presumably because 16x needs more pulses per second than 8x? What is the typical life expectancy of the laser? I know you can run a test in Service Mode using a blank DVD-RAM, which will measure the laser's power output and tell you if it's still fresh and new, or if it's getting weak, or if it's about to go out. Does the laser typically get progressively weaker, or does it fail suddenly? If it gets progressively weaker, is it still able to playback disks in the last phase of its life?


If memory serves, I've had 3 lockups in these six months. Random times, random functions. All recovered from using the little reset button. Granted, those lockups shouldn't have happened. Got some more comments about this... but for a future post, as this one's long enough already.
 

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I think you'd notice a big difference between 4 and 8hrs if you had a bigger TV and used a connection other than RF which is the worst of connections by far.

Personally I've used several spindles of Memorex discs(before I realized the TDKs I was buying were actually Memorex
)and never really had a problem. I'm more worried about long term reliability than the initial burn. I just can't believe all the posts about people having problems with Memorex discs can be an anomaly, I also remember how poor Memorex audio and video tape were, not to mention the 2 Memorex DVD players I bought and had problems with. IMO Memorex=garbage and I personally will not buy another product made by them.

In regards to the 16x media, other than the first spindle of DVDs I bought in '05(when the 8x were cheaper than the new 16x) I've only used 16x discs and not had a problem with laser burn out. I've burned maybe a thousand R discs and several hundred RW discs with not a laser failure. I can see the advantage of the 8x discs and will probably switch to Ty 8x when I get low but I wouldn't sweet it for now if you have a supply of 16x.

I think lasers go gradually but you probably don't know about it until it finally gets so bad it fails. Kind of like our digital TV, works great until it doesn't
not much grey area with digital.

Welcome to the forum, good to hear something positive about the EZ-48
 

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I recently purchased an EZ48, hoping to take advantage of some of the newer recording technology. I have a cable box, so the set up goes like this:


cable wall outlet -> cable in (cable box)

Cable Box: RF Out -> EZ48 RF in

EZ48: HDMI -> TV (46 in LCD)


The issue I'm seeing is that with channels that are broadcast at 1080i, they appear letterboxed, with about a 1.5 inch black bar on the top and bottom. For those that are standard 480i, the image fills the entire screen. In both cases, the image quality is "ok," but not stellar (especially the HD stuff). If I eliminate the EZ48 and run the HDMI straight from the cable box, there are no issues with letterboxing, and the quality of the image is very good.


Another oddity (with the initial setup mentioned above) is that when using the guide on the cable box, the letters appear a little blocky, and the text in general seems to shift color as I move the selection from one location to another.


Any ideas on how this might be improved?


Thanks.
 

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First ditch the RF cable from your STB(cable box) to EZ and run a line output instead. S-video and audio would be best but composite(yellow) would be OK. Also look in your STB setup and see if you can adjust it to output Wide Screen over a SD output. If you post the model of your STB others may be able to say if this is possible. If not then all you're going to get is letterboxed output for HD channels and postage stamp output for 4:3 upconverted HD programs.

I would also run a second HDMI cable from your STB to your TV and use that connection for all your live TV watching. Only use the HDMI cable from your EZ for watching recorded TV(since it will only be SD or upconverted HD) not true HD like from your STB.

Lastly if your STB is not capable of outputting WS out of SD outputs and you want to spend the money you could but a component to S-video converter(off the internet) and get much better looking picture quality. They run just north of $100 and have the benefit of allowing you to copy, copy protected material also.
Heres a link to a recent thread talking about such a device, their are others also around, one started by Nextoo also comes to mind but it's a bit older.


edit: note if you're using the tuner on your EZ and recording directly from the clear QAM or analog channels you can still use the RF for those channels, you just don't want to be recording from the channel 3 or 4 modulated RF output from your STB, that's what I mean by the worst connection. Since you mentioned letter boxing I assumed you were recording from channel 3 or 4. I'm not sure how many new STBs have a unmodulated RF passthru, if yours doesn't you'd need a splitter before your EZ if you wanted to use RF.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17767423


Also look in your STB setup and see if you can adjust it to output Wide Screen over a SD output.

The STB is made by Motorola and has a DVR. There are options to set the tv screen size, the resolution for the component video, and the resolution for the 4:3 override. Currently the 4:3 override is set to 480i- it allows me to set a "stretch" option, but I haven't tried that yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17767423


I would also run a second HDMI cable from your STB to your TV and use that connection for all your live TV watching.

Would that mean I'd need a hub or splitter? The STB only has one HDMI output on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17767423


note if you're using the tuner on your EZ and recording directly from the clear QAM or analog channels

I'm trying to keep it so that the channel/guide stuff is managed by the STB.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17767423


Since you mentioned letter boxing I assumed you were recording from channel 3 or 4

This is correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17767423


I'm not sure how many new STBs have a unmodulated RF passthru,

The STB Setup has an option to enable/disable RF Bypass - is this the same thing?



Your help is much appreciated.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wid3scr33n /forum/post/17770160


The STB is made by Motorola and has a DVR. There are options to set the tv screen size, the resolution for the component video, and the resolution for the 4:3 override. Currently the 4:3 override is set to 480i- it allows me to set a "stretch" option, but I haven't tried that yet.

I'm no expert on STBs but I believe Motorola is one of the mfgs. that don't allow wide screen over SD outputs like composite and S-video
You wouldn't want the stretch option, if they had a zoom option that might work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wid3scr33n /forum/post/17770160


Would that mean I'd need a hub or splitter? The STB only has one HDMI output on it.

No you want to run your STB and EZ's HDMI out to your TV(which hopefully has 2 HDMI inputs) if not they you could use component from your EZ or STB(again assuming your TV has a component input).

Quote:
Originally Posted by wid3scr33n /forum/post/17770160


I'm trying to keep it so that the channel/guide stuff is managed by the STB.

That makes sense, if this is the case you can do away with the RF cable from your STB to your EZ and only record from your EZs line input which will give you a better picture than RF that you're using now, although it still won't get rid of your black bars.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wid3scr33n /forum/post/17770160


The STB Setup has an option to enable/disable RF Bypass - is this the same thing?

Yes it is, if you wanted to tune and record with your EZs tuner you'd want to disable the RF modulator, but again if you're just offloading your DVR then don't even bother with the RF cable to your EZ and again use the S-video or composite and audio to your EZ.


You can record without the adapter but it sounds like without a component to S-video adapter you'll be stuck with the letter box or postage stamp SD channels
 

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I was browsing on amazon and reading reviews of the EZ48 - and it was stated(by a owner named 'Barry') that the HD OTA signals coming in are first down-converted and then up-converted out to the TV... Is this correct? And if so is there any work around?


I recently got an HD monitor - the pioneer krp-500m, which doesn't come with an in-built tuner so it was fortuitous that I'd already brought the EZ 48 refurbished for our old CRT(where HD of course didn't matter).


I must say I was surprised to read this as the HD channels look really good to me, but I feel cheated(for lack of a better word) if they're being unnecessarily messed with.


I did read some of this thread before I brought it - and will read more. Overall, I've been happy with the unit, with it's one major negative being it's s-l-o-w speed - but everything else I've been happy with so far.


Any help/comments appreciated...


Thanks,

Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyerob /forum/post/17772096


I was browsing on amazon and reading reviews of the EZ48 ...

I did read some of this thread before I brought it - and will read more. Overall, I've been happy with the unit, with it's one major negative being it's s-l-o-w speed - but everything else I've been happy with so far.

Hey Rob, if you were reading Amazon reviews of the EZ48, you may have seen my review there too. A lot of the reviewers there dogged the EZ48 for slow speed. Maybe we should give those folks an old 286 running Win31 if they wanna see real slow, haha.


From studying the service manual, I can kind of see a reason for some of this slowness. They're using a 16-bit custom microcontroller as the main system "brain". On power up, this processor (IC7501) wakes up and runs internal code which starts off with self-test (you see this as the 0-0-,etc), during which it talks along a serial comm buss to all the major components (vhs, dvd, tuner, etc). Each of the sub-systems has to go through a boot and homing / initialization, and that takes some time, plus serial bus comm is generally slow. Other machines that seem 'faster', may either be not powering off fully, or just not running diagnostics on powerup.


When you buy a machine like this, in a way you're buying a piece of the mind(s) of the designers, the engineers, and even the corporate management of the manufacturer. It's been said that you can look at the internal architecure (hardware + software) of a given machine, and see an image of the management structure of the parent company. I've seen that to be true with mainframes, and with DEC minicomputers, and yes even with the Panny EZ48.


The engineers at Panasonic most certainly know about AV systems. It's their bread and butter (or noodles and soy, considering they're Japanese
. They understand how to make it work, how to design the hardware and create the software to drive it, to make it do what they believe is desired by the consumer. And if the company's smart, they'll have their PR folks doing market research to keep a finger on the pulse of just what the customer DOES want. Usually this all results in a superior and desirable product (with the exception of the Ford Edsel, haha).


While I hope that I never need the service manual to repair the Panny, I'm a tech and I like to take a peek under the hood. (Or more than a peek, at times.) The average user never sees the internal hardware, only the software, specifically the User Interface. And in many ways the User Interface is the most critical part of the system in terms of customer satisfaction, and it's one of the easiest areas for the manufacturer to control. With no changes to the actual performance of the machine, a small effort in the area of user interface can make the difference between a product that gets so-so reviews, versus GREAT reviews.


Sadly, design engineers frequently blow it in this area of user interface. From what I've seen, Panny's engineers were pretty sharp (oh wait, that's another company
about making the EZ48 do its song and dance... but they aren't always so great on how they present all these features and controls to the user. They could maybe take a little lesson from Microsoft here, in that Microsoft spent a lot effort in user surveys -- watching how ordinary people reacted to and interfaced with the controls. Burying the DVD Management panel 3 menus down, for example, is an area in the EZ48 software that could stand a little improvement (imo)


And then take the User Manual. Because my EZ48 was a refurbed unit, it came with a photocopied manual. That's a double whammy because the copy was hard to read. While the syntax in the manual indicates it was obviously translated from Japanese, pretty much everything you need to know IS in there, but sometimes ya gotta go hunt for it and figure out what they're trying to say. Compare this to the external deck I've got hooked up to the Line2 inputs --it's a tunerless Samsung DVD-VR375. Its manual is noticeably better organized and easier to read. Piddly nits to pick, I admit, but maybe Panny will listen to the feedback to keep on improving the product.


Well, I'm running long again, sorry. More later, if desired.
 

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Yes everything is downconverted to 480 and then upconverted if using HDMI. This sounds bad but truthfully when I had my EZ-28 (lacks the VHS of the EZ-48v) I thought 720p channels looked almost HD, 1080i channels did show a drop though on my 32" HDTV.

The only way to get a new true HD tuner is to buy a dedicated one, IOW not a DVDR.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesGarfield /forum/post/17772738


Hey Rob, if you were reading Amazon reviews of the EZ48, you may have seen my review there too. A lot of the reviewers there dogged the EZ48 for slow speed. Maybe we should give those folks an old 286 running Win31 if they wanna see real slow, haha.


From studying the service manual, I can kind of see a reason for some of this slowness. They're using a 16-bit custom microcontroller as the main system "brain". On power up, this processor (IC7501) wakes up and runs internal code which starts off with self-test (you see this as the 0-0-,etc), during which it talks along a serial comm buss to all the major components (vhs, dvd, tuner, etc). Each of the sub-systems has to go through a boot and homing / initialization, and that takes some time, plus serial bus comm is generally slow. Other machines that seem 'faster', may either be not powering off fully, or just not running diagnostics on powerup.


When you buy a machine like this, in a way you're buying a piece of the mind(s) of the designers, the engineers, and even the corporate management of the manufacturer. It's been said that you can look at the internal architecure (hardware + software) of a given machine, and see an image of the management structure of the parent company. I've seen that to be true with mainframes, and with DEC minicomputers, and yes even with the Panny EZ48.


The engineers at Panasonic most certainly know about AV systems. It's their bread and butter (or noodles and soy, considering they're Japanese
. They understand how to make it work, how to design the hardware and create the software to drive it, to make it do what they believe is desired by the consumer. And if the company's smart, they'll have their PR folks doing market research to keep a finger on the pulse of just what the customer DOES want. Usually this all results in a superior and desirable product (with the exception of the Ford Edsel, haha).


While I hope that I never need the service manual to repair the Panny, I'm a tech and I like to take a peek under the hood. (Or more than a peek, at times.) The average user never sees the internal hardware, only the software, specifically the User Interface. And in many ways the User Interface is the most critical part of the system in terms of customer satisfaction, and it's one of the easiest areas for the manufacturer to control. With no changes to the actual performance of the machine, a small effort in the area of user interface can make the difference between a product that gets so-so reviews, versus GREAT reviews.


Sadly, design engineers frequently blow it in this area of user interface. From what I've seen, Panny's engineers were pretty sharp (oh wait, that's another company
about making the EZ48 do its song and dance... but they aren't always so great on how they present all these features and controls to the user. They could maybe take a little lesson from Microsoft here, in that Microsoft spent a lot effort in user surveys -- watching how ordinary people reacted to and interfaced with the controls. Burying the DVD Management panel 3 menus down, for example, is an area in the EZ48 software that could stand a little improvement (imo)


And then take the User Manual. Because my EZ48 was a refurbed unit, it came with a photocopied manual. That's a double whammy because the copy was hard to read. While the syntax in the manual indicates it was obviously translated from Japanese, pretty much everything you need to know IS in there, but sometimes ya gotta go hunt for it and figure out what they're trying to say. Compare this to the external deck I've got hooked up to the Line2 inputs --it's a tunerless Samsung DVD-VR375. Its manual is noticeably better organized and easier to read. Piddly nits to pick, I admit, but maybe Panny will listen to the feedback to keep on improving the product.


Well, I'm running long again, sorry. More later, if desired.

James, Thankyou for the long and entertaining responce



I think that most people (me included - although thats changing) aren't concerned with whats 'under the hood' so to speak and just want to push the gas pedal and go (to continue the lame analogy) - but it's enlightening to have more 'hands-on' folks such as yourself fill us in with all the nuts and bolts and that these things don't work with voodoo magic - although sometimes it seems that way! - So I agree that it's very important for manifacturers to focus as much on the 'front end' that most people see as well as the inner workings...


I've learned to live with the EZ48's speed and just know now to leave it for a minute to 'warm up' and then it works fine - the DVD recordings look esp. good.


I'm just supprised and bummed that this doesn't have a true, pass through, HD tuner... I guess I'm going to have to reconfigure my set up - and this may be religated to my old CRT, which I planned to keep anyway.


Thanks again,


Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff /forum/post/17772742


Yes everything is downconverted to 480 and then upconverted if using HDMI. This sounds bad but truthfully when I had my EZ-28 (lacks the VHS of the EZ-48v) I thought 720p channels looked almost HD, 1080i channels did show a drop though on my 32" HDTV.

The only way to get a new true HD tuner is to buy a dedicated one, IOW not a DVDR.

Thanks for your responce jjeff.


I've gotta say this does do a good job of upscaling and this is very apparant with DVD's and the 24p play back is a bonus too - I recently watched 'saturday night fever' and it looked REALY good.-Still, I would like to see my OTA signals unmessed with - at least to compare...


So, a couple of follow up questions(wouldn't you know
):


-What does IOW mean?


-could you suggest a good stand alone HD tuner?


-Is it likely that an all in one unit like this will ever have a 'true' HD tuner?


-If I got a stand alone tuner would it be possible to use it along with the EZ48 to record - with an RF splitter maybe?


Really loving OTA and feel that cable/satelite is over priced esp. considering all the comercials and repeats. Besides i've blown everything on my shiny new Kuro - so don't want a DVR with a contract, although I've heard good things about Tivo's - maybe I could purchase one without a contract? I'll do some more research.


Thanks for your answer and all your help on this thread.


Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesGarfield /forum/post/17772738


From studying the service manual, I can kind of see a reason for some of this slowness. They're using a 16-bit custom microcontroller as the main system "brain". On power up, this processor (IC7501) wakes up and runs internal code which starts off with self-test (you see this as the 0-0-,etc), during which it talks along a serial comm buss to all the major components (vhs, dvd, tuner, etc). Each of the sub-systems has to go through a boot and homing / initialization, and that takes some time, plus serial bus comm is generally slow. Other machines that seem 'faster', may either be not powering off fully, or just not running diagnostics on powerup.


When you buy a machine like this, in a way you're buying a piece of the mind(s) of the designers, the engineers, and even the corporate management of the manufacturer. It's been said that you can look at the internal architecure (hardware + software) of a given machine, and see an image of the management structure of the parent company. I've seen that to be true with mainframes, and with DEC minicomputers, and yes even with the Panny EZ48.


The engineers at Panasonic most certainly know about AV systems. It's their bread and butter (or noodles and soy, considering they're Japanese
. They understand how to make it work, how to design the hardware and create the software to drive it, to make it do what they believe is desired by the consumer. And if the company's smart, they'll have their PR folks doing market research to keep a finger on the pulse of just what the customer DOES want. Usually this all results in a superior and desirable product (with the exception of the Ford Edsel, haha).

Historical perspective is important as well. I've been a Panasonic "power-user," currently with fifteen functional ES and EZ series recorders. Six of my 2005 and 2006 models have each accumulated between 3,000 and 4,400 recording hours. Seven others have each accumulated between 1,200 and 2,300 recording hours. I own these models, DMR-ES30V and DMR-ES40V from 2005; DMR-ES15, DMR-ES25, DMR-ES35V from 2006; DMR-EZ17 from 2007; and DMR-EZ28 from 2008. (I also own six additional "parts machines," a total of 21 Panasonic ES and EZ series recorders.)


My "DigaDo" screen identity is based upon Panasonic's "Diga" trade name for their line of recorders. Since my Panasonic ES series recorders "Do" what's expected of them--and they usually "Do" it very well--I chose the name "DigaDo."


Owners of several outstanding earlier ES series combo recorders (the 2005 DMR-ES30V and 2006 DMR-ES35V, DMR-ES45V and DMR-ES46V) had high expectations of the digital tuner EZ series combo recorders introduced in 2007.


For one reason or another Panasonic chose not to build upon those outstanding earlier products but instead adapted the operating system of the dreadful 2005 DMR-ES40V combo recorder as the basis for the EZ series combo recorder operating system. EZ series DVD Recorders had an operating system adapted from the 2005 DMR-ES20 DVD recorder.


As older Panasonics were appearing to reach the end of their useful lives I anticipated replacing them with the next generation of these recorders. What a letdown it was to discover that the 2007 EZ series recorders had bugs and design flaws carried over from the unsatisfactory 2005 DMR-ES20 and DMR-ES40V models. Not only that, but the EZ series combo recorders had been stripped of the full-featured menu-initiated dubbing/copy features essential for serious dubbing/copying projects. Fortunately I was able to complete my 5,200 title selective dubbing/copying project without using EZ series recorders. Others have not been so fortunate. The 2008 and 2009 model year EZ models continue the earlier bugs and design flaws. In earlier posts a number of posters, myself included, have commented on these matters in great detail so I won't repeat those matters here.


With the many Panasonic recorders in my service I found it necessary to learn service, repair and rebuilding procedures.


I no longer purchase Panasonic EZ series recorders nor do I expect to make future Panasonic recorder purchases (other than as a parts supply).


Beginning in 2008 and continuing this year I've purchased two Philips HDD/DVD recorders, five Magnavox HDD/DVD recorders, all outstanding products. I've also purchased two Magnavox combo recorders, one Magnavox DVD recorder and one Sylvania combo recorder. All but the Sylvania have performed well. (The Sylvania was later given away.)


"DigaDo" the Magnavox and Philips owner/user, who would have guessed?
 

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Interesting stuff DigaDo - So your not optimistic that panny will step up their game in the coming years?


I'm going to look into the Phillips and Magnavox DVRs - do you know if they have true 'pass through' HD tuners, or do I need to look elsewhere?


Thanks,

Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyerob /forum/post/17773532


Interesting stuff DigaDo - So your not optimistic that panny will step up their game in the coming years?


I'm going to look into the Phillips and Magnavox DVRs - do you know if they have true 'pass through' HD tuners, or do I need to look elsewhere?


Thanks,

Rob

Philips and Magnavox HDD/DVD recorders have amplified RF pass throughs of whatever signal is present at the RF input. If the RF input signal is HD the RF output signal will also be HD. HD signals are downconverted to SD when recorded to the internal hard drive or when dubbed or recorded to DVDs.


DVRs provided by cable and satellite services may record HD signals to their internal hard drives but DVRs do not have the capability to record HD signals to removable media (DVDs).


You may wish to consult this thread for information concerning recording HD signals:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=42
 

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DigaDo, Thanks a lot, this info is very useful - I'm now in the market for a Megnavox/Phillips -(and looks like I'm not the only one judging by amazon) if the answer to the following question is 'yes' :


If the incoming RF signal is HD, will the HDMI (or component) output signal remain(in it's original format) HD? - my monitor has no RF in.


I'd assume(never a good idea!) that you can record HD on to a hard drive, even from OTA - so I guess I'll be looking for a model with a hard drive as well.


Thanks again and for the link also



Rob
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyerob /forum/post/17773732


DigaDo, Thanks a lot this info is very useful - i guess I'm in the market for a Megnavox/Phillips - and looks like I'm not the only one judging by amazon...


Maybe I'll wait for next year and see if panasonic comes out with a unit with passthrough...


I'd assume(never a good idea!) that you can record HD on to a hard drive, even from OTA - so I guess I'll be looking for a model with a hard drive as well...


Thanks man!

Panasonic DVD recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs. Panasonic combo recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs upon power-up. The RF output may be modulated by pressing the SCHEDULE button or whenver playing or recording a videotape or DVD. If you want to change the default modulation status some Panasonic combo recorders may have that option. See the model specific Operating Instructions for more information.


Most DVD recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs. Some combo recorders have modulated RF outputs, others do not.


If you're interested in the RF pass through arrangements for specific models download and study the owner's manuals found on the brand or manufacturer website.


J&R.com and walmart.com are the best sources for the Magnavox 2160A models. There are other sources for the discontinued Philips 3575/3576 models. Panasonic's current models are found in some retail stores and through online sources.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DigaDo /forum/post/17773863


Panasonic DVD recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs. Panasonic combo recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs upon power-up. The RF output may be modulated by pressing the SCHEDULE button or whenver playing or recording a videotape or DVD. If you want to change the default modulation status some Panasonic combo recorders may have that option. See the model specific Operating Instructions for more information.


Most DVD recorders have unmodulated RF pass throughs. Some combo recorders have modulated RF outputs, others do not.


If you're interested in the RF pass through arrangements for specific models download and study the owner's manuals found on the brand or manufacturer website.


J&R.com and walmart.com are the best sources for the Magnavox 2160A models. There are other sources for the discontinued Philips 3575/3576 models. Panasonic's current models are found in some retail stores and through online sources.

So, it varies not only by brand but also by model and sometimes your able to change the default modulation status - can this be done on the EZ48? -this would be problem solved.


I don't want to pick your brain on every model (although there doesn't seem to be many with HD turners) and I'll research each in the appropriate threads...but maybe you could suggest a model that is known not to mess with the signal even if it is going out through a cable that is not RF as my TV doesn't have an RF in - it's actually a monitor the pioneer krp 500m - the best thing I've ever brought and I just want to feed it un-messed-with OTA HDTV (as well as BDs etc).


I do appreciate your time - hopefully this helps others too as it's obvious to me that there's a shortage of DVDR's with HD tuners on the market - and I have little choice without getting cable or a stand alone tuner (and not being able to record).


Thankyou,


Rob
 

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Just thought of something that I think warrents a double post:


I'm going to hook up the RF to an old CRT that I have and also hook up the HDMI to the plasma -this may force the EZ48 to pass through the signal untouched through both outputs. I'm at work now (don't ask!) so I'll have to try later today.


I actually tryed this before with an LG monitor I had(with HDMI input) and I remember both displays blanking out for a few seconds and then coming on and the aspect being messed with on the HD display (and I think the CRT) - but this could be a good sighn! - I'll report back my findings
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyerob /forum/post/17773950


So, it varies not only by brand but also by model and sometimes your able to change the default modulation status - can this be done on the EZ48? -this would be problem solved.


I don't want to pick your brain on every model (although there doesn't seem to be many with HD turners) and I'll research each in the appropriate threads...but maybe you could suggest a model that is known not to mess with the signal even if it is going out through a cable that is not RF as my TV doesn't have an RF in - it's actually a monitor the pioneer krp 500m - the best thing I've ever brought and I just want to feed it un-messed-with OTA HDTV (as well as BDs etc).


I do appreciate your time - hopefully this helps others too as it's obvious to me that there's a shortage of DVDR's with HD tuners on the market - and I have little choice without getting cable or a stand alone tuner (and not being able to record).


Thankyou,


Rob

The tuners/DTV modules in all retail consumer devices that record to DVDs downconvert to SD for recording. These SD down conversions may then be "upconverted" to the HDMI and component outputs but neither provide or "pass" actual HD signals. Of course, the S-Video and composite outputs are analog. It's all SD--there are no HD tuners whatsoever in retail consumer devices in the USA marketplace that record to DVDs. (Some folks build their own HD tuner-equipped computer for this purpose.) This thread addresses these matters in more detail:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=599173


On those models with (unmodulated) RF pass throughs the HD signals are passed through from the RF input to the RF output. That allows for daisy-chaining of recorders and/or STBs.


Again, discussions concerning HD DVRs are found in the sub-forum linked earlier.
 

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Just to reiterate what Digado said, everything about a DVD recorder is SD, nothing including the tuner (which can tune HD channels) output real HD, only upconverted HD which is not the same.
This is a good thread talking about true HD tuners, some are only for OTA(antenna setup) and some are also for QAM(digital cable).

I don't expect DVDRs to ever output true HD and IOW is shorthand for In Other Words. Oh and I really don't know to much about the true HD tuners, the few I've used are no longer available. This model seems to get good reviews and is about as cheap as a true HD tuner gets, but I believe it's still ~$100.
 
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