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Thank you for the information! I cannot wait till you do a side by side comparison on the TVs. On that note, I do own last year's Samsung... (well 2015) 65JS8500 and that one has been a great TV. Looking for a TV in the basement where it is much darker therefore wanting FALD instead of edge lit. I did order the 65n9000u when it was on sale on ebay but I won't get it till maybe Weds. If this TV is indeed better than the 65KS8000, then I won't need to return it or try to buy one now with the epp deal.

On my original post, I meant to reference the Samsung, not the Sharp, concerning my complaint on black levels and being edge lit. The main reason for buying the Sharp is improvement over the Samsung in black levels and NOT being edge lit.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I finally made sense of the brightness levels on rtings. Wonder why it drops off at 2% and 100%? Maybe due to FALD? I'm sure the black levels has to be better on this TV than the edge lit ones. So, how are the overall black levels and Contrast? I'm sure it won't get to OLED levels but if it is close enough, I can live with it. Oh... and no one answered my question about leaning with the stands... upright or lean? How about HDR material... does it display correctly?
The black levels, contrast, and brightness are... excellent.

I just took a 4ft level and stood it up vertically on my media cabinet (where the TV sits), kissed right up flush to the front of the TV (at the bottom). The top of the TV is ever so slightly about .5 to .75 of a inch back from the base.

I pushed the brightness and exposure on the pics in order to better show the gap -- sorry if they are too bright. Of the slight tilt back, it wasn't really until I measured it that I noticed it. It is a negligible tilt, looks straight (no one in my family noticed) and really the screen just looks right -- well it also looks huge :))

*Funny, I had a Hisense H9B (the 55" variant of the Sharp which I had to return due to a screen crack) and there was no tilt to it.

Really interested to hear the feedback from you guys about the N9000U!

-Chris
 

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The black levels, contrast, and brightness are... excellent.

I just took a 4ft level and stood it up vertically on my media cabinet (where the TV sits), kissed right up flush to the front of the TV (at the bottom). The top of the TV is ever so slightly about .5 to .75 of a inch back from the base.

I pushed the brightness and exposure on the pics in order to better show the gap -- sorry if they are too bright. Of the slight tilt back, it wasn't really until I measured it that I noticed it. It is a negligible tilt, looks straight (no one in my family noticed) and really the screen just looks right -- well it also looks huge :))

*Funny, I had a Hisense H9B (the 55" variant of the Sharp which I had to return due to a screen crack) and there was no tilt to it.

Really interested to hear the feedback from you guys about the N9000U!

-Chris


Thank you so much.... I can live with that. That's not much of a lean... I think the Hisense 65h10b leans like 4" to 5" which would have been too much for me.


Hopefully my TV will be here soon but the initial review by you seems very promising!
 

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is the ULED a real thing, or just marketing?

how does this compare to 2017 models?

Hisense has 65-H9D for $1299, and 65-H9D+ (ULED) for $1999 and 75-H9D+ (ULED) for $2500. there is also the 75-R8 for $1999.

Sharp has 65-P9000 for $1999.

all have WCG, but no quantum dots.
both 75 inchers have directlit local diming, and the sharp has something called ELED local dimming.

the H10D (w/ quantum dots) will be too expensive
 

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is the ULED a real thing, or just marketing?

how does this compare to 2017 models?

Hisense has 65-H9D for $1299, and 65-H9D+ (ULED) for $1999 and 75-H9D+ (ULED) for $2500. there is also the 75-R8 for $1999.

Sharp has 65-P9000 for $1999.

all have WCG, but no quantum dots.
both 75 inchers have directlit local diming, and the sharp has something called ELED local dimming.

the H10D (w/ quantum dots) will be too expensive


ULED would be similar to the SUHD label used by Samsung. Something to distinguish their higher end TVs. Do you have any link to the other sets in your post? I could not seem to find much on them. I think one of the biggest differences will be FALD vs edge lit.


Update: found this link:

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/Hisense/4K/hdr/Dolby_Vision/Ultra_HD/price/ces-2017/Laser_TV/Projectors/uled/ces-2017-hisense-readies-2017-ultra-hd-tv-lineup-including-first-4k-laser-cast-tv/37694

Looks like the H9D and H9D+ are all edge lit. The H10 series are going to be FALDs like this Sharp. It looks like the 2017 equivalents to this Sharp are going to be twice as much price wise.....
 

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Discussion Starter #27
is the ULED a real thing, or just marketing?

the H10D (w/ quantum dots) will be too expensive
The Sharp N9000U has 3M Quantum Dots as opposed to the slightly lower tiered Chinese nanocrystals of the Hisense H9B I previously and briefly owned -- the Sharp also has nearly three times the FALD zones 240 to 85).

I just watched Marco Polo and am now watching Chef's Table France, they both look awesome in HDR viewed over the XB1S.

The only 2017 Hisense that comes close is their H10 range which I think starts at 70"... and requires a big bag of cash.

I thought the Hisesne H9B was the best deal of the year when I got it from PC Richard for $500 for my kids for this Christmas (it may still be if you can find one) but this Sharp N9000U at almost 70% off its original street price is ridiculous!
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
ULED would be similar to the SUHD label used by Samsung. Something to distinguish their higher end TVs. Do you have any link to the other sets in your post? I could not seem to find much on them. I think one of the biggest differences will be FALD vs edge lit.
ULED, SUHD, Triluminous, PrimeHD are the same thing(s) by different names -- it's the marketing term that Hisense/Sharp, Samsung, Sony, and LG all use respectively for integrating quantum dot and HDR technology into their TVs.

So, wider color gamut, better contrast, and brighter panels... and it works!
 

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is the ULED a real thing, or just marketing?

how does this compare to 2017 models?

Hisense has 65-H9D for $1299, and 65-H9D+ (ULED) for $1999 and 75-H9D+ (ULED) for $2500. there is also the 75-R8 for $1999.

Sharp has 65-P9000 for $1999.

all have WCG, but no quantum dots.
both 75 inchers have directlit local diming, and the sharp has something called ELED local dimming.

the H10D (w/ quantum dots) will be too expensive
ULED (Quantum Dots) is both, marketing and a real thing. It has to due with the actual light the TV generates to create the backlight. In a traditional TV (not quantum dot) the light has to be filtered, that filtering causes it to be dimmer, etc. Quantum Dots (in the most basic terms) allows for unfiltered (and thus brighter) light to be used which in general terms means bright images, fuller (and broader) colors, etc. That being said ULED is not a requirement for HDR, it is simply one means of designing a TV that allows those TV's to reach those color and brightness ranges but the tv still needs to have a 10-bit panel for instance. So a TV could have quantum dots, be especially bright and colorful, but still lack the panel to display the full range of HDR colors and thus have banding like a traditional set despite having the nits to otherwise be "HDR". Thats kind of whats hurting the market right now, "HDR" is such a loose term that really is made up of numerous technical components the various companies are doing a really really poor job of customer education and product identification.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
ULED (Quantum Dots) is both, marketing and a real thing. It has to due with the actual light the TV generates to create the backlight. In a traditional TV (not quantum dot) the light has to be filtered, that filtering causes it to be dimmer, etc. Quantum Dots (in the most basic terms) allows for unfiltered (and thus brighter) light to be used which in general terms means bright images, fuller (and broader) colors, etc. That being said ULED is not a requirement for HDR, it is simply one means of designing a TV that allows those TV's to reach those color and brightness ranges but the tv still needs to have a 10-bit panel for instance. So a TV could have quantum dots, be especially bright and colorful, but still lack the panel to display the full range of HDR colors and thus have banding like a traditional set despite having the nits to otherwise be "HDR". Thats kind of whats hurting the market right now, "HDR" is such a loose term that really is made up of numerous technical components the various companies are doing a really really poor job of customer education and product identification.
Well, not entirely -- HDR is a software metadata specification for brightness, contrast, and color while quantum dots (a hardware technology) help us pull off HDR by allowing for brighter panels, wider color gamut, and richer color saturation.

There are currently two flavors of HDR metadata: HDR10 and DolbyVision.

In order for a TV to support either HDR10 or DolbyVision, beyond being able to simply reach certain brightness levels or display a specific color gamut width, the TV's firmware must be able to decode the HDR metadata.

For example, when I owned the Hisense H9B (great thread here on AVS about it) the firmware initially did not support HDR10 metadata. Nothing about the attributes of the panel changed, but with a firmware update that supported HDR10 metadata, the TV was instantly an HDR TV.

I also have a Vizio P50 which initially only supported DolbyVision but with a firmware update is now also able to decode HDR10.

Are SUHD, ULED, and Triluminous displays better than LCD displays that are not? Yes, definitely! The integration of LCD's cutting edge technologies in color gamut, brightness, contrast, and software decoding simply create a significantly better picture.

Now, when you leverage Full Array Local Dimming as opposed to side-lit screen, you get yet another jump in picture quality. With FALD, in addition to the other benefits of quantum dot technology, you get dramatically blacker blacks and tremendous contrast! The more zones in the FALD, the better the black performance and the better the contrast :)

When it's all working together: the contrast, brightness and wide color gamut of quantum dots, FALD, (and other stuff like a 120hz native panel)... then HDR comes in and choreographs the picture dynamics in software from the source (a 4k blueray for example).

I was just watching Sicario and Deadpool in UHD HDR blu-ray from the XB1S on the N9000U. The dust floating in the air moving from a dark shadow through a streak of sunlight in an open window is awesome. Likewise the lighting in Deadpool, and the color, I think is a great example of HDR -- both in the bright scenes and the dark scenes.

The N9000U is a just a tremendous display. I have a long-in-the tooth 50" TCL 4k display (from the pre-Roku, pre-HDR days) which has been a great display and I have a Vizio P50... The Sharp is in a completely different weight class in terms of picture quality and overall viewing experience.

-Chris
 

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Well, not entirely -- HDR is a software metadata specification for brightness, contrast, and color while quantum dots (a hardware technology) help us pull off HDR by allowing for brighter panels, wider color gamut, and richer color saturation.

There are currently two flavors of HDR metadata: HDR10 and DolbyVision.

In order for a TV to support either HDR10 or DolbyVision, beyond being able to simply reach certain brightness levels or display a specific color gamut width, the TV's firmware must be able to decode the HDR metadata.

For example, when I owned the Hisense H9B (great thread here on AVS about it) the firmware initially did not support HDR10 metadata. Nothing about the attributes of the panel changed, but with a firmware update that supported HDR10 metadata, the TV was instantly an HDR TV.

I also have a Vizio P50 which initially only supported DolbyVision but with a firmware update is now also able to decode HDR10.

Are SUHD, ULED, and Triluminous displays better than LCD displays that are not? Yes, definitely! The integration of LCD's cutting edge technologies in color gamut, brightness, contrast, and software decoding simply create a significantly better picture.

Now, when you leverage Full Array Local Dimming as opposed to side-lit screen, you get yet another jump in picture quality. With FALD, in addition to the other benefits of quantum dot technology, you get dramatically blacker blacks and tremendous contrast! The more zones in the FALD, the better the black performance and the better the contrast :)

When it's all working together: the contrast, brightness and wide color gamut of quantum dots, FALD, (and other stuff like a 120hz native panel)... then HDR comes in and choreographs the picture dynamics in software from the source (a 4k blueray for example).

I was just watching Sicario and Deadpool in UHD HDR blu-ray from the XB1S on the N9000U. The dust floating in the air moving from a dark shadow through a streak of sunlight in an open window is awesome. Likewise the lighting in Deadpool, and the color, I think is a great example of HDR -- both in the bright scenes and the dark scenes.

The N9000U is a just a tremendous display. I have a long-in-the tooth 50" TCL 4k display (from the pre-Roku, pre-HDR days) which has been a great display and I have a Vizio P50... The Sharp is in a completely different weight class in terms of picture quality and overall viewing experience.

-Chris
I think you hit the nail on the head by accident with your "nothing changed and suddenly it was an HDR tv". What is "HDR" what is "hdr-10?". Does simply being able to receive the meta data (i.e. HDMI spec compliant as well) constitute HDR10? Can a TV that receives the signal, interprets it, but still has an 8-bit panel and limited luminance still be considered an HDR set? What if it shows expanded color range but not the full gamut? If not what is the minimum? Dolby Vision has an advantage here in that it is a concrete set of standards and a related certification, you are Dolby Vision or you aren't. HDR10 partially because it's open source and doesn't have a unified backer/licensing body also leaves itself very much open to interpretation. You could have 6 TV's from various manufacturers all saying "HDR Support" or "HDR Capable" or "HDR Processing" or "HDR XYZ" with wildly different capabilities. I for one would have a hard time considering any TV that is edge lit to be a truly satisfactory HDR set, but many many people are still happy with the Samsung 8000 series despite issues with black levels, light bleed, etc. So HDR10 becomes this very nebulous concept and the manufacturers and marketing speak are their own worst enemies here because it leads to consumer confusion and doubt. Plenty of folks I know are hesitant to buy a TV right now because they think HDR is a shifting thing and if they buy now they will be missing out on what becomes the "industry standard" (i.e. blu-ray vs hd dvd type of thing). HDR 10 is clearly the way forward with support from Sony and Microsoft on the games side, Dolby Vision will likely remain a thing but a niche thing. End of the day HDR is really a "basket of goods" and the industry needs to ratify a standard even if it's tied "HDR Gold / HDR Silver / HDR Bronze" or something like. your average consumer isn't going to deep dive into panel specs and nit measurements. The UHD Alliance last I checked was heading towards an HDR-10 certification program and that should go a long way with consumer education and confidence.
 

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My Sharp arrived today. Great packaging on this - much better than what Samsung does. The outer/upper portion of the box lifts off leaving the lower portion and the TV supported and standing allowing you to attach the wall mounts without removing the TV! Build quality is very nice and easily matches the ks8000. If you want to see what this TV can do download the LG OLED chess demo - black levels and contrast are noticeably better on the Sharp compared to ks8000:

http://demo-uhd3d.com/fiche.php?cat=uhd&id=145

I am having some problems with the reds/magentas on this set. This seems to occur on skin tones when combined with red lights/explosions. I noticed this quite a bit while watching The Force Awakens blu-ray from my x-box one s. Portions of the faces would become redish, almost pixelated. I did not notice this on my Samsung. See attached photo. Other than that, this TV is a great value for the price.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Wow, Chess demo is awesome!

However, in that video, I thought the saturation in the faces was a pushing a little red. I haven't done any calibration, but dropping color from 50 to 40 made a nice difference.

I am also downloading the Samsung demo "Chasing the Light" -- it's great to see high quality source material on the Sharp!!

Impressive,

-C
 

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Just got mine in today and it is indeed an amazing set. Just getting it all set up now. Any recommended settings to start out with?
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Some discussion on the red/magenta shift with the European version of this TV - this is similar to what I am seeing in my photo above:

https://www.avforums.com/threads/hisense-65xt910-owners-thread.1992681/page-226

It seems Hisense has acknowledged this issue and it only affects certain panels. Is anyone else seeing this problem?
Interesting. I haven't seen it, though it's only been a week ;-). I watched the NFL this weekend and it looked great. Watched parts of Sicario (4kBD), Deadpool (4kBD), Despicable Me 2 (BD), and then Xfinity HDTV. It's been fantastic!

Then this morning I checked out the Chess video and then the Samsung "Chasing the Light". I watch those clips on the Sharp and just sit back say "whoa!"

It has all looked great!
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Just got mine in today and it is indeed an amazing set. Just getting it all set up now. Any recommended settings to start out with?
Congrats!

Each input has its own settings which is great given the variability of different sources. I just took these settings while watching the Chess video via USB. This is totally by eye ;-)

I use Standard picture mode with:
Brightness: 50
Contrast: 50
Color: 40

Backlight: 45-60
Local dimming: On

Sharpness: 5
Ultra Smooth Motion: Clear
Noise Reduction:Medium
Adaptive Contrast: Medium
Color Temp: Standard

The standard settings are pretty damn good but there's a little motion artifacting happening when the Ultra Smooth Motion is at Standard versus Clear (it's basically MEMC off, low, med, high). However with HD cable I will turn brightness down a bit.

Awesome TV!

-Chris
 

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My set lands tomorrow and I am stoked... got my shield TV and Ps4 Pro ready and itching to see that sweet sweet HDR love :) I have a HiSense H8 currently as an auxiliary TV in my home office (games and 4k monitor use on occasion) so I wasn't too worried about quality but glad to here everyones expectations are being met (and apparently smashed!).
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I will say that Marco Polo in HDR10 on the Sharp is an appreciably better picture and viewing experience than DolbyVision on the Vizio P50.

Just sayin':)
 
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