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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
www.speakerpower.net


SpeakerPower recently released a new line of rack mount and plate amps that are geared toward the DIY crowd. While their amps used to have strictly SpeakOn, PowerCon, and XLR with no user-controllable EQ, crossovers, or phase control now have binding posts, NEMA-15 power cords, RCA inputs, and all the aforementioned signal controls.

Also making things more appealing is a recent price drop across the board!

I know Brian frequents most of the forums out there, so I’m sure any questions here will be answered.


My first experience with SpeakerPower amps was when Jeff Permanian (JTR Speakers) brought his highly acclaimed Orbit Shifter LFU to my first AVS GTG in 2013. I couldn’t believe a plate amp (SP1-4000) could bring a single enclosure to such immense SPL levels (tested by data-bass.com to exceed 130db).


These amps are also used by Seaton Sound, Danley Sound Labs, Power Sound Audio, and Deep Sea Sound to name a few.


I purchased my first SpeakerPower amp (rack mount SP2-12000) at the end of 2014 to drive a pair of Othorn tapped horn subwoofers (designed by Josh Ricci of data-bass.com) loaded with B&C 21-IPAL drivers. These drivers have an unusually low Re of 0.7ohm, and even though the impedance drops to ~1.1ohm while loaded in an Othorn, the SP2-12000 has effortlessly drove these subs all while remaining cold to the touch. In the last ~1.5 years I’ve only seen the fans actually turn on two or three times. I’ve measured SPL levels just north of 139db at the seats in my HT room with just these two subs and a single SpeakerPower amp!


I recently purchased another SP2-12000 to power my latest project of (8) sealed 21” drivers and I’m thrilled with the results. I encourage anyone else using these amplifiers to post their experiences here!



DP:






HT:



 

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Discussion Starter #2
What good is a thread without some pictures!


First SP2-12000 purchased in 2014:












10awg L6-30P vs. 14awg NEMA 5-15P:











SP2-12000 that arrived this week:












 

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Question: since the 240v spec has a lot more power than the 120v, if I have the standard 3-wire 240v U.S. home wiring, could I just run a 30-amp 240v connection (two 120v legs plus a common ground) to get the higher power?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Question: since the 240v spec has a lot more power than the 120v, if I have the standard 3-wire 240v U.S. home wiring, could I just run a 30-amp 240v connection (two 120v legs plus a common ground) to get the higher power?
Yes, and that's exactly what I did.

I had already run a 30A circuit (10awg wire) for my Crest CC5500 amp, so I bought one of these breakers and used the white wire (neutral) for the other 120v "hot" wire. Bingo, two 120v lines plus a ground.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Siemens-30-Amp-Double-Pole-Type-QP-Circuit-Breaker-Q230U/100002289

I also used this for the outlet:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/30-Amp-2...cking-Single-Outlet-Black-L630RCCV3/100117946

However, if you have a 20A circuit, you could do the same with a 20A dual breaker.
 

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Yes, and that's exactly what I did.

I had already run a 30A circuit (10awg wire) for my Crest CC5500 amp, so I bought one of these breakers and used the white wire (neutral) for the other 120v "hot" wire. Bingo, two 120v lines plus a ground.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Siemens-30-Amp-Double-Pole-Type-QP-Circuit-Breaker-Q230U/100002289

I also used this for the outlet:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/30-Amp-2...cking-Single-Outlet-Black-L630RCCV3/100117946

However, if you have a 20A circuit, you could do the same with a 20A dual breaker.


Cool. I have a 20-amp now that everything run on, but I may run another 20-amp line. All my power cords are NEMA-15, but I have 5 power amplifiers and all of them combined can pull more power than a single 20-amp, although I've never tripped a breaker.
 

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Make sure you only try this if you have a dedicated single outlet on it's own breaker. Most houses string several duplex outlets on one 20A breaker. All of them will have 240VAC on them if this mod is done and will blow up most 120V gear plugged into them. Also to comply with National Electrical Code the wires carrying 120VAC should be black or red, not white. But I have heard of worse things being done. Like lifting grounds!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Make sure you only try this if you have a dedicated single outlet on it's own breaker. Most houses string several duplex outlets on one 20A breaker. All of them will have 240VAC on them if this mod is done and will blow up most 120V gear plugged into them. Also to comply with National Electrical Code the wires carrying 120VAC should be black or red, not white. But I have heard of worse things being done. Like lifting grounds!

Really good points!


Lucky for me all 7 circuits are dedicated just to the amp rack.


During inspection on the electrical, I was required to put red electrical tape on each end of the white wires (in the breaker panel and in the outlet) to comply with code on the 240v runs.
 

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I wouldnt use a 2 pole breaker for a 240 line. if something goes wrong with one line, the other will still be hot and you may not realize it. It should be a single pole breaker for safety.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I wouldnt use a 2 pole breaker for a 240 line. if something goes wrong with one line, the other will still be hot and you may not realize it. It should be a single pole breaker for safety.

You have to use a 2 pole breaker. However, the two breakers are connected so if one trips they both do.
 

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Then i must be thinking of 2 seperate breakers for a 240 line. Sorry, in the middle of training ATM. I was thinking of tandem breakers
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, I ordered a 3rd SP2-12000 last week. Anything less on the Othorns just left too much of their potential unused.
 

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So the $2,650 12000-DSP Amp looks quite nice in terms of power output. Where are the distortion figures though? I would most certainly want 240v to take advantage of the power output, otherwise you might as well get a Behringer or Crown instead for the same 120v power levels.
 

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Where are the distortion figures though?
No half-decent SS amplifier produces more than 0.1% distortion until clipping. Which is plenty clean enough for subwoofer duty.
Nobody is gonna power a tweeter with a 12kW amp either (nobody should at least...)

Look at data-bass, even the best drivers produce 1% distortion all the time (or MUCH MORE...)
The only time you might hear an amplifier through a subwoofer cone is if it is clipping, limiting, or about to explode. ;)

If you want to power tweeters, buy a McIntosh for the expensive-end or Emotiva for the cheap-end. I would avoid using pro amps for powering tweeters if you can, especially multi-kW pro amps, they have horrible noisefloors (and fans too).
The only reason to use pro amps for tweeters is to save money or maybe rackspace. (I use clone amps for tweeters for those reasons, it's not really ideal, but it does get the job done...)
 

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No half-decent SS amplifier produces more than 0.1% distortion until clipping. Which is plenty clean enough for subwoofer duty.

Nobody is gonna power a tweeter with a 12kW amp either (nobody should at least...)



Look at data-bass, even the best drivers produce 1% distortion all the time (or MUCH MORE...)

The only time you might hear an amplifier through a subwoofer cone is if it is clipping, limiting, or about to explode. ;)



If you want to power tweeters, buy a McIntosh for the expensive-end or Emotiva for the cheap-end. I would avoid using pro amps for powering tweeters if you can, especially multi-kW pro amps, they have horrible noisefloors (and fans too).

The only reason to use pro amps for tweeters is to save money or maybe rackspace. (I use clone amps for tweeters for those reasons, it's not really ideal, but it does get the job done...)


I'm not really looking to power tweeters. I'm just saying that I didn't see THD listed anywhere in the specs. Maybe I missed it? I've seen some amps show power at .3%, or .5%, or 1%. I don't see the THD figures in the specs on these.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm not really looking to power tweeters. I'm just saying that I didn't see THD listed anywhere in the specs. Maybe I missed it? I've seen some amps show power at .3%, or .5%, or 1%. I don't see the THD figures in the specs on these.
I think I remember seeing 0.1%, but I'm sure Brian will chime in.
 

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I'd guess that the difference in power output between 0.1% and 1.0% is less than 1db, since 6kW vs 3kW is only 3db, which is 50% less power.
When your ears are screaming in pain from 12kW and 140db, an extra 1db here or there isn't gonna make a big difference in the pain level experienced. 3db probably would though...
 

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Comments above are correct. The power numbers specified are at 1%, but just below that level the distortion is below 0.1%. Your ability to perceive distortion is greatly reduced at sub frequencies. And the distortion of any amp above the clipping level is in the 10% to 100% range unless a clipping eliminator circuit is used. Our sub amps have such a circuit that is not defeatable.

Comparing a Beringer 12000 to my 12000 is not even close in many ways. B is a 20 year old design with no post filter feedback and does not make anywhere near the power specified.

The 120VAC 20A service is not as big a limitation as you might think when you discover that for 10 seconds a 20A breaker can pass 80A. And for shorter periods, even more.

Breaker curves
 
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