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First, have you read through this lengthy but excellent post?


Second, it sounds like your calibration is maxed out since it is -12. That thread talks about getting the best calibration. It also means you will probably have even less bass at your start.

Did you buy directly from SVS? You can return that sub and just go larger (and that should increase your budget). Based on my reading, many here will tell you to buy the single largest sub you can affortd to buy if you aren't going dual to eliminate nulls and smooth your frequency response. Mixing the different sized subs isn't going to be preferential, either. You are going to have two subs with different output levels and frequency responses and may create even more problems for yourself without some extra work.

I get the size preference, but I'm also not sure you need a sealed unit simply because it is mostly music. And there is also the option of the PC units if you want a smaller footprint with ported.

Sure others will chime in. Hopefully @Ed Mullen will respond. I'd call SVS as well, but I think at a minimum you need two of the 3000 series or one of the 4000 series based on what you are looking to achieve in that size of a room.
Yes I read through this post and various other sub-woofer threads for last few days and gained some knowledge.

I bought from Amazon and cannot return it now. Based on output I am getting from sb-2000 it looks like I will do well with dual sb-3000, and it may better than single SB 4000 but I was thinking of re using sb-2000 with the new sb-3000 if it makes sense. I don't want to go with the PC models for whatever reasons. When I called SVS they commanded dual SB16 ultras which is beyond my budget, probably because I told them I listen to high volume music which may not be entirely the case.

I think the same like you that 2 of sb-3000 would be best for me, I have read that single sb-4000 creates highs and nulls and dual sb-3000 do better than single 4000.

My idea was to reuse sb-2000 that I already have with a new sb-3000 if that would work as well. That will save me about $500 if I buy 2 new sb-3000 instead and sell sb-2000.
 
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Yes I read through this post and various other sub-woofer threads for last few days and gained some knowledge.

I bought from Amazon and cannot return it now. Based on output I am getting from sb-2000 it looks like I will do well with dual sb-3000, and it may better than single SB 4000 but I was thinking of re using sb-2000 with the new sb-3000 if it makes sense. I don't want to go with the PC models for whatever reasons. When I called SVS they commanded dual SB16 ultras which is beyond my budget, probably because I told them I listen to high volume music which may not be entirely the case.

I think the same like you that 2 of sb-3000 would be best for me, I have read that single sb-4000 creates highs and nulls and dual sb-3000 do better than single 4000.

My idea was to reuse sb-2000 that I already have with a new sb-3000 if that would work as well. That will save me about $500 if I buy 2 new sb-3000 instead and sell sb-2000.
From your 4 options, without getting into details and other recommendations, I'd vote for the dual sb3000s. I'm an advocate for using the same caliber and performing subwoofers in general. Sure, you can use a 2000 and place it nearfield, but you will still be essentially going down to your common demoninator in a way to make it work. What if you move your furniture around down the road? Or if you want to experiment with sub placement? etc. Just spitballing thoughts, it might never be an issue for you and that option may end up being perfect for you...but the easier answer is dual sb3000s from your list :D
 
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Hi Everyone, I was about to create a new thread for my situation but looks like this SVS thread is a better place to post my question!

I got a sb-2000 few weeks back for my large room about 3300 cu-ft (20X9X18 WxHxD) and I feel it is not enough for my space. I also have a kitchen next to this listening area (family room) which is again about the same size. I thought 500 watt RMS will be enough but I was wrong, I also emailed SVS for 3300 cu-ft room and they confirmed sb-2000 would be fine probably because they didn't knew the adjoining kitchen situation. Even though I am not looking for sub to fill kitchen as well with bass, but due to this entire open area (about 6 to7k cu-ft), a bigger sub may be required due to the way bass travels in the given space.

So I am looking to upgrade and thinking of these options:
1. Get sb-3000 and go dual with sb-2000 that I have. Is it a good pairing?
2. Get sb-4000 and either sell sb-2000 or go dual with sb-4000 and sb-200
3. Go dual with 2 new sb-3000s
4. Other option are going dual with sb-4000 or sb-16 ultra but not looking to spend that much

I am more inclined towards sealed subs due to their small size and primary listening is music 70% of time.
I put gain on sb-2000 at 12 O'Clock and that put the sub to -12db after I ran MCACC Pro on Pioneer SC-95 receiver, then I increased it to -6, and also increased gain on sub to 2 O'Clock position. It sounds better but just not good enough to feel the (mid?) bass and looks like I need more sub power, even though sb-2000 seems to be running hot now. Speakers are set to small and sub set to SB1+ with 100hz crossover.

Please suggest which of these options are worth trying, or any other recommendations. I am inclining towards getting sb-3000 and going dual with sb-2000 that I already have now. This also fits my budget of about $1000 to spend for SB-3000.

Thanks

Hi,

I have several comments to make. First, the biggest issue with your overall room size is not that bass will fill all of that space. All sound wavelengths will fill that space. The various wavelengths will just be louder closer to the source of the sound coming from your speakers and your sub(s). The biggest issue with a room that size (and it is a single room in this respect) is that you won't get much room mode gain until you get below 15Hz. You will still get some boundary gain, from the walls and the ceiling, just as you would in a smaller room. But, the most significant room gain is dependent on bass sound waves traveling to the furthest corner of the room, and then returning to your listening position. In large rooms, that happens at much lower frequencies than it does in small rooms. (This is explained in detail in Section VII-B of the Guide.)

The bottom line here is that it is very likely that you will want more subwoofer power from that standpoint alone. And, whatever you get would ideally have more low-frequency extension than you have now, because your room won't amplify low-bass frequencies much until you are well under 20Hz. I think that you may have a problem getting as much bass as you want with sealed subs. But, at a minimum, I would recommend dual SB3000's. Sorry about that, as I know that is a more expensive option!

The second overall comment concerns bass preferences. Room size is only one factor in determining how much subwoofage someone may need, and it is often not the most important factor. Our own bass preferences vary quite a bit, both with respect to desired volume, and with respect to desired extension---how much we want to hear and feel the very low-frequencies. It isn't even enough to talk just about your master volume level, because most people add subwoofer boost at whatever volume level they are listening.

That is especially the case for movies, where the low-bass special effects can be such an important aspect of the movie experience. And, even if you are only watching movies 30% of the time, I think that you will find that to be important when you do watch them. You can actually get even better low-bass in a multi-purpose home theater, than you can in a commercial movie theater, if you are willing to work at it a bit.

Personally, in a space that size, I would start with at least a single ported PB3000, and then add a second one when I could afford to do it. It will do everything that a sealed sub will do above about 40Hz, but it will do much more than an equivalent sealed sub will do below 40Hz, and particularly below 30Hz. In my opinion, selling your SB2000, and getting a ported PB3000, would be a much better long-term strategy.

If you absolutely can't bring yourself to do that, for whatever reason, then I would move to a pair of SB3000's. The 3000 models are inherently stronger than the 2000 models (a good bit stronger in fact). You can pair a weaker sub with a stronger one, but it partly defeats the purpose of adding the stronger subwoofer in the first place. Having two identical subs is a much better option, for a number of reasons. I hope that this helps! :)

Regards,
Mike
 

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From your 4 options, without getting into details and other recommendations, I'd vote for the dual sb3000s. I'm an advocate for using the same caliber and performing subwoofers in general. Sure, you can use a 2000 and place it nearfield, but you will still be essentially going down to your common demoninator in a way to make it work. What if you move your furniture around down the road? Or if you want to experiment with sub placement? etc. Just spitballing thoughts, it might never be an issue for you and that option may end up being perfect for you...but the easier answer is dual sb3000s from your list :D
pbz06, so dual sb-3000 instead of mixing with lower caliber sb-2000. Thanks for your input!
 
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Hi,

I have several comments to make. First, the biggest issue with your overall room size is not that bass will fill all of that space. All sound wavelengths will fill that space. The various wavelengths will just be louder closer to the source of the sound coming from your speakers and your sub(s). The biggest issue with a room that size (and it is a single room in this respect) is that you won't get much room mode gain until you get below 15Hz. You will still get some boundary gain, from the walls and the ceiling, just as you would in a smaller room. But, the most significant room gain is dependent on bass sound waves traveling to the furthest corner of the room, and then returning to your listening position. In large rooms, that happens at much lower frequencies than it does in small rooms. (This is explained in detail in Section VII-B of the Guide.)

The bottom line here is that it is very likely that you will want more subwoofer power from that standpoint alone. And, whatever you get would ideally have more low-frequency extension than you have now, because your room won't amplify low-bass frequencies much until you are well under 20Hz. I think that you may have a problem getting as much bass as you want with sealed subs. But, at a minimum, I would recommend dual SB3000's. Sorry about that, as I know that is a more expensive option!

The second overall comment concerns bass preferences. Room size is only one factor in determining how much subwoofage someone may need, and it is often not the most important factor. Our own bass preferences vary quite a bit, both with respect to desired volume, and with respect to desired extension---how much we want to hear and feel the very low-frequencies. It isn't even enough to talk just about your master volume level, because most people add subwoofer boost at whatever volume level they are listening.

That is especially the case for movies, where the low-bass special effects can be such an important aspect of the movie experience. And, even if you are only watching movies 30% of the time, I think that you will find that to be important when you do watch them. You can actually get even better low-bass in a multi-purpose home theater, than you can in a commercial movie theater, if you are willing to work at it a bit.

Personally, in a space that size, I would start with at least a single ported PB3000, and then add a second one when I could afford to do it. It will do everything that a sealed sub will do above about 40Hz, but it will do much more than an equivalent sealed sub will do below 40Hz, and particularly below 30Hz. In my opinion, selling your SB2000, and getting a ported PB3000, would be a much better long-term strategy.

If you absolutely can't bring yourself to do that, for whatever reason, then I would move to a pair of SB3000's. The 3000 models are inherently stronger than the 2000 models (a good bit stronger in fact). You can pair a weaker sub with a stronger one, but it partly defeats the purpose of adding the stronger subwoofer in the first place. Having two identical subs is a much better option, for a number of reasons. I hope that this helps! :)

Regards,
Mike
Hi Mike, This helps a lot! Thanks for taking time to respond with details for my open floor plan situation. It seems that ported is recommended for big open area like mine. I may have to start with single pb-3000 for now due to price, and may look to add another in future if needed but will have to deal with WAF for 2nd pb-3000 ;)
 

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Can anyone talk about the PB 3000 and how it works at normal levels ?
Do you still get a good bass punch or dose it have to be up louder
One of the hallmarks of an excellent sub is sounding great at low/moderate volumes. Naturally perceived 'punch' is largely a function of playback level - but other subjective aspects like balance, extension and solidity/authority are important at should shine through even at lower playback levels.
 

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Really? Just some distilled water in a spray bottle and that does the trick? I’ll go and pick some up at the store and give it a whirl, thanks for the help😁
If the speaker has dust or fingerprints, a lightly damp (distilled is fine) microfiber cloth wiped in one direction works best.

Then apply an automotive grade detail spray with a different microfiber cloth to maintain the finish.

If there are micro-scratches in the clear coat, a light polishing compound like Meguiar's Ultimate Polish and a microfiber cloth will remove them nicely.
 
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Why are you guys feeling the need to shut off the power to your subwoofers? The current SVS amplifiers use very little power when in standby. Less than a dollar a year.
And it may be better for the amplifier not to have the power to it switched on and off constantly.
Lots of comments on this one. :)

It's not that using the hard power switch (or killing the AC power upstream) is 'unsafe'. With that said, any high power amplifier will experience an in-rush current and temperature/component fluctuations when it's powered-on like that. It's the same reason most laptop and PC users keep the machine running 24/7/365 as opposed to a hard boot-up.

It's preferable to put the amp in Auto mode and allow it to drop into standby (20 min with no signal), where it will use <0.5W of power. Standby keeps all of the components stable and at optimal temperature and keeps the caps topped off - so the amp is ready to go when it wakes up.
 

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Reading the review of the PB3000 at audioholics, I noticed the amp has 4 wires going to the sub driver, is the PB3000 driver a dual X ohm driver ?

Pic taken from Audioholics

The 3000 series uses a split-wind VC, but it's not a DVC. The two positives and two negatives are joined at the woofer terminals.

The Sledge 500 in the 2000 series has a similar layout with two sets of output terminals connected to the woofer.
 

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I'd appreciate help in making a decision. I'm currently considering upgrading my remaining SB-2000 speaker which is currently paired with a PC-2000 Pro (sealed mode) located in the farthest corner diagonally in an irregularly shaped room (stubby "T" shaped room with the screen and front right sub in alcove) of approximately 500 sq' with an 8' ceiling. The carpeted wood floor is situated over the garage with blown open cell insulation under the floor joists. My MLP is approximately 13.5' from the front sub. My question is whether I would appreciate a significant difference in low bass extension and chest "slam" when comparing the SB-3000 with the SB-4000 at typical movie volume? The PB-3000 /4000 are not under consideration because of size placement limitations. Thanks for any and all opinions!
At typical movie volumes (which would be -15 to -10 on the master volume after calibration), there will definitely be a subjective difference between the SB-3000 and the SB-4000, particularly in the 18-36 Hz octave where the SB-4000 has a significant dynamic output advantage.
 

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Yes I read through this post and various other sub-woofer threads for last few days and gained some knowledge.

I bought from Amazon and cannot return it now. Based on output I am getting from sb-2000 it looks like I will do well with dual sb-3000, and it may better than single SB 4000 but I was thinking of re using sb-2000 with the new sb-3000 if it makes sense. I don't want to go with the PC models for whatever reasons. When I called SVS they commanded dual SB16 ultras which is beyond my budget, probably because I told them I listen to high volume music which may not be entirely the case.

I think the same like you that 2 of sb-3000 would be best for me, I have read that single sb-4000 creates highs and nulls and dual sb-3000 do better than single 4000.

My idea was to reuse sb-2000 that I already have with a new sb-3000 if that would work as well. That will save me about $500 if I buy 2 new sb-3000 instead and sell sb-2000.
Since you don't seem to be inclined to add another SB-2000 (through the outlet), there's one other option to consider, so long as it can be positioned in your room: the PC-2000 (cylinder) in sealed mode. It has the same amp & internals as your SB-2000 and is rated to go lower than your current sub. It's still available NEW through the SVS outlet for several hundreds less than an SB-3000. You could try it out for 45 days and return at no cost it if that doesn't work for you, in case you opt for a pair of SB-3000s. FYI, I just added an SB-4000 (purchased through the outlet) to my existing SB-2000 and I'm very happy with the sound pressure and low bass clarity, despite the difference in components between the 2 series. I firmly believe that a pair of SB-4000s would be overkill in my HT. It all boils down to whatever works for you. I have only a single couch in my HT and I've not been aware of any nulls or other aberrations with these 2 subs at the 3 main seating spots.
 

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Since you don't seem to be inclined to add another SB-2000 (through the outlet), there's one other option to consider, so long as it can be positioned in your room: the PC-2000 (cylinder) in sealed mode. It has the same amp & internals as your SB-2000 and is rated to go lower than your current sub. It's still available NEW through the SVS outlet for several hundreds less than an SB-3000. You could try it out for 45 days and return at no cost it if that doesn't work for you, in case you opt for a pair of SB-3000s. FYI, I just added an SB-4000 (purchased through the outlet) to my existing SB-2000 and I'm very happy with the sound pressure and low bass clarity, despite the difference in components between the 2 series. I firmly believe that a pair of SB-4000s would be overkill in my HT. It all boils down to whatever works for you. I have only a single couch in my HT and I've not been aware of any nulls or other aberrations with these 2 subs at the 3 main seating spots.
Hi docrog, Well maybe you are right that another sb-2000 is all I may need to fill the difference, and I actually didn't thought much about it as option. I was just thinking to get bigger sub as a solution. Do you think another sb-2000 s worth a try for my big space? You got sb-4000 so it could be that you are now just hearing sb-4000 only and sb-2000 may not be doing much? How big is your room?
Thanks
 

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The manual for the SB-4000 doesn't appear to indicate what occurs with the "AUTO" power setting. Does this mean that the sub is in an "ALWAYS READY" condition? Is there any reason NOT to use this as default? Also, is there any technical method to best adjust phase and room correction if I don't have a sophisticated room EQ program at my disposal? Thanks!
Auto mode means the amp will drop into standby (<0.5W consumption) after 20 minutes of no signal. And it will wake-up in the presence of a signal. So this is the preferred power mode setting in most applications.

The display setting is independent of the power mode setting - and most users choose Off and 10 seconds for the time-out. The display will light-up when you are using the menu, and it will go dark after 10 seconds of no use. It will temporarily light up when the amp drops into standby with a 'goodbye' and when it comes out of standby it will show the last menu setting for 10 seconds and then go dark again.

If you are connecting to an AVR which has an auto-set-up program, leave the subwoofer at the factory default settings, except for the volume, which you'll typically need to adjust so that the sub channel level doesn't come back 'bottomed out' at the minimum value. I would try -15 on the volume for starters and see where the AVR sets it. .
 

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Hi docrog, Well maybe you are right that another sb-2000 is all I may need to fill the difference, and I actually didn't thought much about it as option. I was just thinking to get bigger sub as a solution. Do you think another sb-2000 is worth a try for my big space? You got sb-4000 so it could be that you are now just hearing sb-4000 only and sb-2000 may not be doing much? How big is your room?
Thanks
I've been able to listen to the same recordings with & without the SB-2000 in use and it certainly seems to me that the SB-2000's cone's additional movement of air is noticeable in the mid-low bass, not just in volume; I wouldn't represent that it appreciably adds to the lowest pedal tones. My room is very irregularly shaped (somewhat of a "stubby-T") with the MLP about 14' from the R&L front corner located subs. This area is almost an alcove (the bottom of the "T") and the room opens up widely behind the MLP. If you plan to make your purchase from SVS there's no risk or downside to buying the SB-2000 for your evaluation.
 

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I've been able to listen to the same recordings with & without the SB-2000 in use and it certainly seems to me that the SB-2000's cone's additional movement of air is noticeable in the mid-low bass, not just in volume; I wouldn't represent that it appreciably adds to the lowest pedal tones. My room is very irregularly shaped (somewhat of a "stubby-T") with the MLP about 14' from the R&L front corner located subs. This area is almost an alcove (the bottom of the "T") and the room opens up widely behind the MLP. If you plan to make your purchase from SVS there's no risk or downside to buying the SB-2000 for your evaluation.
Got it. I am thinking because of my large room size instead of trying another small sub like a 2000, I will just go for at-least one bigger sub...either pb-3000 or sb-4000. What made you go for sb-4000 and not anything other like pb-3000?
 

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Got it. I am thinking because of my large room size instead of trying another small sub like a 2000, I will just go for at-least one bigger sub...either pb-3000 or sb-4000. What made you go for sb-4000 and not anything other like pb-3000?
I didn't have the spatial option of considering ported 3000/4000 subs, so that was never a realistic consideration for me, irrespective of how much additional low bass could be obtained. I think that it's hard for me to extrapolate how much sound loading your space/MLP requires. It's probably best to have that conversation with the CSRs at SVS. The outlet price of the SB-4000 in the Outlet is only $300 more than the price of a new SB-3000 for comparable finishes. BTW, the Black Ash SB-4000 that I obtained from the outlet was, even on detailed inspection, essentially "like new" without a single cosmetic blemish on the case (as per the photo on the website). I anticipated that one SB-4000 would probably suffice in my setting (enhanced to a degree by the remaining SB-2000) and, if proven correct, would represent a significant cost saving over the pair pricing of two SB-3000 subs. I re-watched the Blu-Ray of "Terminator 2" (DTS 5.1) last night and was incredibly happy with the bass presence, undoubtedly the most immersive that I've been able to accomplish in my HT over the past 30 years. Although the SB-4000 would be cumbersome to re-pack & ship back if it doesn't fulfill your needs, I really feel that it's worth your evaluating that option before committing to a pair of SB-3000s if the folks at SVS have confidence that a a single SB-4000 would suffice in your HT. You could potentially then choose to keep the SB-2000 to augment your bass energy or sell it if the SB-4000 suffices.
 

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Got it. I am thinking because of my large room size instead of trying another small sub like a 2000, I will just go for at-least one bigger sub...either pb-3000 or sb-4000. What made you go for sb-4000 and not anything other like pb-3000?

Hi,

I would really recommend that you stay with your plan to try at least a PB3000 in your room. I went through the reasons in some detail in a previous post, and you saw that my post, and your response that you would start with a PB3000, received several "Likes". There are a number of very experienced HT users who follow this thread, who have large rooms, and who have experienced a number of subwoofer upgrades as a result. Ported subwoofers will be your best choice in this case, and either a PB3000 (with a second one to follow eventually) or a PB4000 (with a second one to follow) will be your best bet.

I have recently illustrated these comparisons on the thread for someone else. A PB3000 will have a +5dB advantage over an SB4000 at 50Hz and below. That is an overwhelming difference! At 16Hz, the difference will be +7dB. At those frequencies, a single PB3000 can literally play a little more than twice as loud as an SB4000. There is that much difference between a ported subwoofer, and a sealed subwoofer that is a model higher. All things considered, if I were you, I would just buy a PB3000 and anticipate adding a second one as soon as I could. The PB3000 has excellent mid-bass output, and pretty good low-bass output, even compared to a PB4000. I am sharing links to independent tests of the SB4000 and the PB3000.

Only the PB4000 (and not the SB4000) was tested, but you can see what it does in Sealed Mode, and that will give you a good basis of comparison to the PB3000. In fact, due to the larger cabinet volume of the PB4000, when the PB4000 operates in Sealed Mode it actually has a little more max output than the smaller cabinet of the sealed SB4000 has. The difference between a smaller sealed SB4000, and a PB3000, would be at least another decibel (or two) greater than the comparison that the tests are illustrating. As noted earlier, In a big room such as yours, large output differences at lower frequencies will be extremely significant, because room gain will not be helping very much until you get well under 20Hz.

SVS PB-4000 Subwoofer Measurements and Analysis | Audioholics

SVS 3000 Series Subwoofer Measurements and Conclusion | Audioholics

Regards,
Mike
 

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Hi,

I would really recommend that you stay with your plan to try at least a PB3000 in your room. I went through the reasons in some detail in a previous post, and you saw that my post, and your response that you would start with a PB3000, received several "Likes". There are a number of very experienced HT users who follow this thread, who have large rooms, and who have experienced a number of subwoofer upgrades as a result. Ported subwoofers will be your best choice in this case, and either a PB3000 (with a second one to follow eventually) or a PB4000 (with a second one to follow) will be your best bet.

I have recently illustrated these comparisons on the thread for someone else. A PB3000 will have a +5dB advantage over an SB4000 at 50Hz and below. That is an overwhelming difference! At 16Hz, the difference will be +7dB. At those frequencies, a single PB3000 can literally play a little more than twice as loud as an SB4000. There is that much difference between a ported subwoofer, and a sealed subwoofer that is a model higher. All things considered, if I were you, I would just buy a PB3000 and anticipate adding a second one as soon as I could. The PB3000 has excellent mid-bass output, and pretty good low-bass output, even compared to a PB4000. I am sharing links to independent tests of the SB4000 and the PB3000.

Only the PB4000 (and not the SB4000) was tested, but you can see what it does in Sealed Mode, and that will give you a good basis of comparison to the PB3000. In fact, due to the larger cabinet volume of the PB4000, when the PB4000 operates in Sealed Mode it actually has a little more max output than the smaller cabinet of the sealed SB4000 has. The difference between a smaller sealed SB4000, and a PB3000, would be at least another decibel (or two) greater than the comparison that the tests are illustrating. As noted earlier, In a big room such as yours, large output differences at lower frequencies will be extremely significant, because room gain will not be helping very much until you get well under 20Hz.

SVS PB-4000 Subwoofer Measurements and Analysis | Audioholics

SVS 3000 Series Subwoofer Measurements and Conclusion | Audioholics

Regards,
Mike
Hey Mike, Yes I am convinced for pb-3000 and was asking docrog any data points he has for going for sb-4000, and based on his reply it looks like it was mostly due to spatial issues. Thanks b.t.w. for the link to subwoofer guide, I read section VII-B and it was very insightful.
One side question, what if I am not able to get second pb-3000 later due to WAF, do I loose too much running with single pb-3000?
Thanks!
 
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Hey Mike, Yes I am convinced for pb-3000 and was asking docrog any data points he has for going for sb-4000, and based on his reply it looks like it was mostly due to spatial issues. Thanks b.t.w. for the link to subwoofer guide, I read section VII-B and it was very insightful.
One side question, what if I am not able to get second pb-3000 later due to WAF, do I loose too much running with single pb-3000?
Thanks!

Thank you for the compliment on the Guide, and you are very welcome for the advice! :) I hope that you will be able to add a second PB3000, at some point, because there will be a lot of benefit to having dual identical subwoofers. But, one reason that I am recommending buying a PB3000 now, is that it will stand alone better than any of the other models you are considering. And, if it takes a while to add the second sub, that will be important.

Here is what I mean by that. I think that a subwoofer's first responsibility is to provide adequate undistorted volume levels from about 30Hz to about 100Hz, or so. Once that most important frequency range is covered adequately, we can start to concentrate more on the <30Hz frequencies. The <30Hz frequencies are important too, especially for the special effects in movies. But, there is far more meaningful content in the 30Hz to 100Hz range.

The PB3000 has outstanding mid-bass; better even than the PB4000, as you can see from the comparison tables I linked. So, in a very large room, if I could only have one subwoofer now, and couldn't jump all the way up to a PB16 for that first one, the PB3000 is the one I would start with.

As you add the second PB3000 later, you will gain an average of +6dB across the full subwoofer range, and that will help you with the <30Hz frequencies. You will notice the increase in max output everywhere, but I believe that the increase <30Hz is where you will notice the second PB3000 the most. And, of course, the second identical subwoofer should help to smooth peaks and dips in the entire frequency response.

Regards,
Mike
 
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