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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just reading another thread about insulation and just realized I may have made a little booboo.


I used pink insulation in my riser to deaden the sound, but didn't think about moisture! I didn't put plastic or anything on the floor it is a concrete slap in the basement.


Should I open that floor up before it is too late (and it's carpeted) and put plastic down then put the insulation? Or is this going to be ok? I'm just wondering if the insulation will sweat and get musty?


Thanks!
 

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Do you have a moisture problem to begin with? I didn’t put plastic down either. I don’t see a moisture problem potential but who am I to say. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No there was no moisture problem to begin with, the house is brand new and the floor is "Tuff-n-dry" which is garanteed to be dry for 10 years I beleive but, since I'm in Canada and it does get cold here, I wonder when the cement gets really cold if that will cause a temperature change with the air/wood at the top which is warm.
 

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What material did you use to construct your column with? If you sat it on the floor, you should have used treated for the base. Any wood that sits on a concrete floor should be treated. Concrete has a high moisture content and as it drys over the years, anything that can "wick" moisture up and out will.


I can't specifically speak for the "tough and dry" type as I have no experience with it, so you may still be okay.
 

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When warm air touches a cold surface there is usually condensation. That is why when insulating walls you put a moisture barrier towards the warm side (normally the inside of a house).


In a basement another source of water is often water leaking in. If you don't have problem with water leaking in, then I would think condensation would be the main water problem. To be cautious you could put a layer of plastic on top of the insulation and below the top of the riser. If that is not possible, maybe use multiple coats of polyurethane to seal the riser.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah ok, so condensation would occur (if it were to happen) at the top of the platform. I can easily remove the cover now that is not a problem. I did not use treated wood for anything that lies on the concrete but neither did the builder!


I think I may pull the cover off and cover the top with plastic. Thanks for the information, maybe it wasn't as bad as I thought!


The only REAL problem would be a basement leak, that would mean the insulation would get soaked.
 
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