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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For a program to be considered HD it has to be filmed using a HD Camera.


So if HBO-HD and SHO-HD is showing a movie that was not filmed using a HD Camera how can they make the claim " Watch (insert name of movie) in High Def. tonight at 8:00 pm."


What resolution are we actually watching?


Wouldn't it only be equal to a DVD?


Is OAR and Video the only advantage that we are receiving?



Or am I really all washed up- (no need to respond


:D)


Dave
 

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What they're basically doing is upscaling the original SD source to HD. They use broadcast quality scalers (i.e., higher ends scalers than most of us can afford).


In the beginning, there was very little true HD material and most broadcasters used such scalers on most material. The KeyDigital KDS-2000HD is a scaler that's designed for broadcasters, rather than the home theater environment.
 

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I am confused by both posts. Basically, all movies are shot using analog cameras and processed on film. So I don't see how the camera is the limiting factor.


Now somehow (and this process is an utter mystery to me), the broadcasters have to obtain a digital signal from this analog source. I have no idea how this works or if the studios provide them digital transfers, but that would seem to the step where the HD/SD distinction would be made.


I am curious about this whole process, can someone with a broadcasting background explain the basics in small words? Or point me towards a basic primer?
 

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There is no reason a film can't be converted to HD. 35mm film has more than enough resolution to produce 1080i with discrete pixels in the HD variant. That said, if you upconvert a videotape to HD, it will obviously have no more information than the videotape.


Mark
 

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Rogo is exactly right.


If the source was shot on film, then the transfer has to be done for HD.


If the source was shot on HD cameras, then no problem converting to the different HD formats (you need a broadcast quality scaler to do it, but it's not a big problem).


if the source was originally shot on SD cameras, then they have to be upscaled (again, by a broadcast quality scaler) and you, of course, get less quality signal, than the above options.


Whether shot in video or film, the data is usually digitized and edited in a computerized system (Avid is the most popular). Avid runs on high end Macs (recently PCs too after Microsoft bought a large chunk of Avid). This is, BTW, a major source of "bad editing" problems (flips between film and video mode) because Avid doesn't always keep the 3:2 cadence sequences during some cuts and edits.


BTW, I believe most shows are now shot on film (and have been for a while) if for the sole purpose of European support. It is much easier to switch from film to NTSC and to PAL, then convert from native NTSC to PAL... Since most shows are sold into the European markets, they have to convert the source out to PAL right from day 1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys for the info and the link - didn't know that it was being talked about already. I do not know to much about this subject, thats why I asked. I was also wondering if we were getting what they claim to be giving us- I guess the answer is yes and it looks like that they will be providing more movies in HD through this up-conversion/scaling process.


Dave
 

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Oh my goodness! Just finished reading the link provided by DavidW. I realize how fortunate we are in this forum to have such helpful and polite posters. Some ppl in there are really, really scary!
 
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