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Hope this is the right area to ask this question. All above objects are in working order. I just got a new TV set that has screwed up my connections, mainly cause the new TV set's connectors are at the extreme left side of it and my VCR and cable box are way over to the right side, enclosed in a nice entertainment cabinet. Moving them is almost nil to make easier connections. So I decided to try only rf connections. Never had done that and wondered if it is as good as composite at least. Not a big HD bug, as long as i can get a decent pic i am satisfied. I have so many surplus cables of all sorts, mainly have buying various products through the years and each time new cables came with them so now i have a closet of them, but none to match the distance of those connections I would have to make with them,other than RF cables. Any ideas would be welcomed.
 

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So I decided to try only rf connections. Never had done that and wondered if it is as good as composite at least. Not a big HD bug, as long as i can get a decent pic i am satisfied.

There are four basic types of analog interconnect cables:

Coaxial RF cable – Also called coax or F-type, coaxial cable is the most basic interconnect option. When used as an interconnect cable, coax can carry video signals up to 350i, which is lower than an analog TV signal. In other words, unless you’re connecting a VCR to a TV, coaxial cable will degrade the signal coming from your video source. Coax is also used as long-run cable, transmitting satellite or cable TV signals from your satellite box or connection to the cable company to your cable receiver, satellite receiver or built-in TV tuner. In this capacity, coax cable works very well. For optimal performance, use coax stamped “RG-6,” rather than “RG-59.” RG-6 coax cable includes better shielding, which reduces interference and signal loss.

Composite – The next step up from coax, composite cable, can carry a 480i signal. This is adequate for analog TV, but will degrade high-definition signals. Composite cables typically have a yellow connector, and are often combined with a pair of analog audio cables, with red and white connectors.

S-Video – Like composite cable, S-Video can carry video signals up to 480i. However, S-Video transmits brightness information and color information separately, which delivers richer colors than composite cable. S-Video is a good option for digital TV and DVD players when higher-quality connections aren’t available, but it will degrade high-definition signals. S-Video doesn’t carry audio, so must be used in conjunction with separate audio cables.

Component – The most advanced type of analog interconnect, component cables can carry up to 1080p, which makes them a good choice for HDTV and other high-definition signals. Like composite cable, component cables are typically combined with red and white analog audio cables.
 

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First, what kind of connections were you using with the old TV?

Second, what kind of TV is the new one? If you're upgrading from and SDTV to HDTV, you really want to see what it would take to get HD from at least the cable box to the TV. The only people I've ever met that were really ambivalent about HD (as you seem to be) are people that had never had a proper HDTV setup. For TVs over 30" or so, the difference is noticeable. Not to mention the aspect ratio issues.

The right answer, IMO, is to just buy the cables you need in the lengths you need to get the best connections from each input device. Cables are really cheap at places like Monoprice and Amazon.
 
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