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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was watching INHD tonight, and a live Charles Brown show came on. I'm thinking to myself, they must have recorded it it '97 right before he died. I was surprised to see in the credits it said 1991.


Just when did HD video recordings start?
 

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There can be analog HD videotapes going back to the eighties, courtesy of the now obsolete Japanese HD Muse system. I think that "Chasing Rainbows", which runs incessantly on the OTA version of HDNet was recorded in analog HD in Canada at least ten years ago -- can anyone remember the copyright on that show?
 

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If you are talking about oldest consumer recordings...as far as I know, yeah MUSE tapings.


Oldest HD period, dates from the 60s


Darius
 

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1964 - Research on high-definition TV begins at The NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories (STRL)


1969 - First exhibition of high-definition TV study at STRL Open House


1970 - NHK determines provisional standards of 1125 scanning lines, 5:3 aspect ratio


1981 - Test manufacture of 1-inch tape VCR for high-definition TV


1983 - Development of MUSE system, compression and transmission system for HDTV


1985 - The name Hi-Vision (HDTV) given to the system


~1988 - Sony Commercial Hi-Vision 1" Helical Scan Recorder Available.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Ken H
1964 - Research on high-definition TV begins at The NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories (STRL)


1969 - First exhibition of high-definition TV study at STRL Open House


1970 - NHK determines provisional standards of 1125 scanning lines, 5:3 aspect ratio


1981 - Test manufacture of 1-inch tape VCR for high-definition TV


1983 - Development of MUSE system, compression and transmission system for HDTV


1985 - The name Hi-Vision (HDTV) given to the system


~1988 - Sony Commercial Hi-Vision 1" Helical Scan Recorder Available.
I gotcha one better. The first "official" HD transmission was by RCA in NYC in 1934 when the RCA techs transmitted a 343 line electronic picture from the ESB. Up until that time TV was anything from 24-120 lines electronic and/or mechanical and when RCA sent this test transmission, the government officially recognized it as a "high definition" broadcast. There is suppose to be film of it in the RCA archives. There is film that is on the Internet when the RCA engineers recorded BBC test transmissions across the Atlantic of 408 line in the 1930's from the ESB. I have seen that.


Of course it isn't even SD by today's standards, but it was HD for the time and was recognized as such, just like one day 1080i will not be seen as HD but SD. Even for a short time NTSC was considered HD.


Time marches on.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by foxeng

The first "official" HD transmission was by RCA in NYC in 1934 when the RCA techs transmitted a 343 line electronic picture from the ESB. ... Of course it isn't even SD by today's standards, ...
That beats SD on DBS doesn't it? ;)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Ken H

1964 - Research on high-definition TV begins at The NHK Science & Technical Research Laboratories (STRL)
Can you imagine being the geeks working on that? I mean, here you have authorization from a high level that, essentially, the current resolution/quality sucks enough to warrant significant research, and you (the geek) have to wait half your life for what you knew then to become a reality now. I bet by now that half of the original HD geek squad have cataracts or other vision problems that prevent them from truly enjoying the brilliant, round world they helped to discover ;)
 

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I have a question....what tv shows were the first to be broadcast in HD in the U.S.? (I'm hazzarding an educated guess that it was probably a CBS show)


Redvette
 

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John Glenn's Space Flight To Be Broadcast Nationwide In HDTV:Broadcast Launches Digital Television Rollout


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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL, October 14, 1998 - When the space shuttle Discovery lifts John Glenn into space later this month, it also will be launching a new era in television - the national rollout of digital television.


Harris Corporation has announced that it will conduct the first live digital high definition television (HDTV) broadcast of a space shuttle launch to audiences nationwide on October 29 - 36 years after Senator Glenn's first historic flight was broadcast in black and white. The company is conducting the broadcast with assistance from WRAL-HD in Raleigh, North Carolina and with the participation of the NHK Japan Broadcasting Corporation.


The scheduled 70-minute telecast will be transmitted live from Kennedy Space Center to more than 15 broadcast stations throughout the United States. The stations will broadcast the program over the air to numerous host viewing sites, including the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum and the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., consumer electronics stores and other locations. Audiences at many of these sites will view the program on new digital television receivers and projectors that are arriving in stores for the first time this month.


Along with live coverage of the launch, the network news-style program will feature high definition interviews by WRAL with Senator Glenn and former CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite, who covered the early space shots including Glenn's first launch into space. It also will include converted historical footage of the space program, and other live and recorded segments. The telecast will be anchored by Mary Alice Williams, formerly of CNN and NBC, and Pete Conrad, an Apollo astronaut who walked on the moon in 1969. The program is scheduled to start at 1:00 p.m. EST.


The broadcast sets the stage for the rollout of digital television in the U.S., which is targeted to get underway November 1, when about 40 stations will be broadcasting a digital signal in markets across the country. Many of those stations are planning to move their on-air dates ahead of schedule to show the Harris broadcast.


"When John Glenn last orbited the Earth, he was riding in a tiny capsule and we were watching him on grainy, black and white television images. This historic launch and digital television broadcast will demonstrate to the world how far the space program and television technology have come," said Phillip W. Farmer, chairman and chief executive officer of Harris Corporation.


Harris Corporation is overseeing the production and broadcast of the program. WRAL-HD, the first station to send out a commercial digital signal in 1996, is providing technical input, editing equipment, as well as several high definition vignettes shot in Houston and Washington, D.C. NHK Japan Broadcasting Corporation is providing the High Definition production equipment and engineering expertise through NHK Enterprises America, Inc., and will transmit a delayed broadcast of the program over its HD network in Japan.


Other organizations involved with the Harris broadcast include Allbritton Jacksonville, Inc., All-Stars Communications, EF Data, Kodak, Newtec America, Turner Engineering, Inc., Unity Motion, and Vinten. Television set manufacturers loaning products include Ampro, Philips, Samsung, Sharp, and Zenith.


The program also will break new ground in another way - becoming the first nationwide digital high definition broadcast to include commercials. Procter & Gamble will have commercials representing several of their product lines, including: Tide, Pampers, Bounty, Scope, and Head & Shoulders.
 

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i remember mtv did some of the early unplugged shows in HDTV but they've never been shown in HDTV[if a network like pbs'd get their hands on these shows that'd be cool]they were taped back in 1990 or so
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by redvette
I have a question....what tv shows were the first to be broadcast in HD in the U.S.? (I'm hazzarding an educated guess that it was probably a CBS show)


Redvette
I guess that needs to be qualified. The first regular scheduled show, or the first program ever or what.


Here is some history to consider:


WRAL-HD Raleigh (channel 26) was the first "commercial station" on the air (beating WHD-HD in DC by a few weeks) in 1996 and they always had some HD of something, usually locally produced in HD. They would turn on the transmitter and run some tape from the transmitter site, go out in the field and run tests on the signal. Those tests usually were ACC college football games WRAL had shot in analog HD (I personally saw Duke vs NC State from 1996 and there were NO graphics other than plain font graphics to show what the score was! Looked like games from the 50's!) or Durham Bulls games (WRAL's owner owns the Bulls) and some of the early PBS stuff and LOTS of Japanese Sony stuff. When they were finished testing, they would turn the transmitter off. If I remember my history correctly, WRAL HD started regular scheduled programming in 1997 when the very first $50k plus sets came out and continued until their permanent channel 53 transmitter was ready in 2000 and they official turned in the experimental channel 26 license and became WRAL-DT 53.


I know CBS was providing WRAL-HD with special HD feeds every now and again to run on WRAL-HD before CBS started regular HD schedule in November 1998.
 

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I should have been more specific; I meant the first regularly scheduled primetime drama or comedy on a major U.S. network (CBS, NBC, ABC).


Redvette
 

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I've had HD since Dec '98, and loved watching some of the great WRAL HD shows - the moving of the NC Cape Lighthouse is my favorite.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by redvette
I should have been more specific; I meant the first regularly scheduled primetime drama or comedy on a major U.S. network (CBS, NBC, ABC).


Redvette
I remember that 101 Dalmatians on ABC was one very early shows, if not the first for ABC. "regular scheduled" as far as almost kind of weekly "Wonderful World of Disney" or some kind of movie night.
 

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Thebarnman, I Googled it, and you're right, the first ever HD broadcast was " 101 Dalmatians" on ABC:


Look Ma, More Choices


What kind of programs will people watch? This Sunday, ABC will air a digital

version of 101 Dalmatians and three to four hours of feature films every week.

NBC plans to show The Tonight Show with Jay Leno in the new format next spring

and also plans HDTV showings of Men in Black and Titanic in 2000.


CBS will show an HDTV-ized Chicago Hope episode on Nov. 18, along with a few

NFL football games (starting with the Nov. 8 game between the New York Jets

and the Buffalo Bills). The shows won’t just be wider; many of them will

be interactive. The digital signal has more bandwidth, so providers will be

able to add more programming elements. “No longer will you watch a

sitcom and have the outcome some scriptwriter thinks you should see,†Harlan

says. “You’ll be able to decide if (Seinfeld’s) George Costanza gets the

girl.†In some cases, viewers will be able to try a trick already

available on some DVDs: multiple camera angles. “You’ll be able to sit at

home, watch a baseball game, decide you don’t want to watch from behind the

catcher’s head, so you’ll click and watch the right field camera,†explains

Harlan. All this extra room in the HDTV signal means that old-fashioned

NTSC programming may not die completely: Under the new standard, TV stations

can broadcast four or more programs simultaneously on a single frequency.

This means a station could run a network soap opera, local news, a local

baseball game, an old movie and an infomercial at the same time. TV viewers

can turn to a channel and flip through the options with their remotes.

Stations could also market these mini channels to different demographics,

resulting in a horde of TV choices. “You’re going to see a lot of nichey

stuff,†says Harlan. The obstacles to rapid adoption remain high. Many

cable operators are reluctant to switch to HDTV channels because they will be

required to give up regular channels. HDTV retailers must create demand in a

market where most viewers are happy with existing technology—and are used to

replacing their sets only every five years or more, at a cost of $500 or

less. “There have been some sets sold, but not many,†says Dennis

Wharton, senior vice president of the National Association of Broadcasters in

Washington, D.C. “This is a chicken-and-egg thing to some extent. The reason

we’re going to be on the air is because, if there are people out there buying

sets, we want them to have programming to see.†By the end of November,

more than 40 stations in 23 cities will offer high- definition programming,

Wharton said. Another potential outcome: HDTV could turbocharge TV

browsing systems like WebTV and the now-dormant NetChannel. Right now, the TV

industry is just beginning to figure out what they will do with HDTV. In the

meantime, rest assured that you’ll probably be buying a big, new TV within

eight years.


Redvette
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by redvette
Thebarnman, I Googled it, and you're right, the first ever HD broadcast was " 101 Dalmatians" on ABC:


{lots of stuff delete}


Another potential outcome: HDTV could turbocharge TV

browsing systems like WebTV and the now-dormant NetChannel. Right now, the TV

industry is just beginning to figure out what they will do with HDTV. In the

meantime, rest assured that you’ll probably be buying a big, new TV within

eight years.
God, we were VERY optimistic back then weren't we! :rolleyes: Thanks Congress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So is it safe to assume the Charles Brown performance running on INHD is the oldest HD recording people have seen?
 
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