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I'm highly interested in the lg flat oleds but I just have one question which is swaying me to the Samsung js9500. The lifespan the burn on how long will this oled last I've read a lot of conflicting stories on this site and don't know what to believe I've seen people say 7000 hours I've seen people say 50000 hours is the lifespan. I've seen oled in person and they look great best I've seen but let's just say the TV burns in or crashes within in year would you pretty much be screwed or what any advice on if oled is worth the 8000 if prob is gunna cost or should I side with the safer Samsung js9500. I mainly watch tv in the dark which is what drew me to oled but the lifespan issues have scared me a little bit. Any ideas will be great
 

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I'm highly interested in the lg flat oleds but I just have one question which is swaying me to the Samsung js9500. The lifespan the burn on how long will this oled last I've read a lot of conflicting stories on this site and don't know what to believe I've seen people say 7000 hours I've seen people say 50000 hours is the lifespan. I've seen oled in person and they look great best I've seen but let's just say the TV burns in or crashes within in year would you pretty much be screwed or what any advice on if oled is worth the 8000 if prob is gunna cost or should I side with the safer Samsung js9500. I mainly watch tv in the dark which is what drew me to oled but the lifespan issues have scared me a little bit. Any ideas will be great
I own a flat OLED and from what I have read Im not worried about lifespan. Forget about burn in, the LG OLEDs have an advanced compensation system to remove image retention. Only OLED tvs with burn in are floor models in stores.
 

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I'm highly interested in the lg flat oleds but I just have one question which is swaying me to the Samsung js9500. The lifespan the burn on how long will this oled last I've read a lot of conflicting stories on this site and don't know what to believe I've seen people say 7000 hours I've seen people say 50000 hours is the lifespan. I've seen oled in person and they look great best I've seen but let's just say the TV burns in or crashes within in year would you pretty much be screwed or what any advice on if oled is worth the 8000 if prob is gunna cost or should I side with the safer Samsung js9500. I mainly watch tv in the dark which is what drew me to oled but the lifespan issues have scared me a little bit. Any ideas will be great
I think the answer is "no one knows for sure because units have not been in the field long enough to tease out problems that could occur after several years of use." The phosphor lifetimes are projections. Informed, but projections nevertheless.
 

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Yeah, no one knows for sure. These sets haven't been out long enough to say otherwise. However, chances are good the TV won't have any issues in the first year. Plenty of people here have owned an OLED screen for more than a year with no issues.

When I look at OLED in other tech - like phones, I will say my Samsung Galaxy Nexus phone developed burn-in from the bottom taskbar after 3 years. That said, my phone displayed more of the same colors throughout daily use than a TV would, so it's hard to say what kind of impact that has on aging. It was also one of the first phones with an OLED screen, so I'm sure the tech has improved since then.
 

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FWIW the LGD specs the panels at a 20,000 hr MTBF whereas the typical LCD panel is rated at 30,000 MTBF

20,000 hrs = 833 - 24 hr periods = ~ 2.283 yrs. at 24/7 and 4.56 yr. at 12 hours a day 7 days a week .
No dog in this fight on the OLED side either way ......... just what I read below and elsewhere.


On the question of IGZO stability, Oh from LG said very frankly that the oxide-TFT process has very narrow process margins and was difficult in the development stage. It is necessary, he said, to understand all of the characteristics and to be able to control them precisely. The situation with the OLED frontplane, he said, “…is not so difficult because we use WOLED,” referring to the white OLED process LG uses for its TV panels. He confirmed that most of the yield issues were related to the oxide-TFT process and the “very complicated backplane,” which uses three or four transistors per pixel (LG uses four). As a result, an extra power line must be designed into the backplane. Farther down the line, LG might consider using a different oxide. For now, the company has made its investment and is enjoying the fruits of its labors.

Oh agreed that the blue OLED lifetime remains on the short side. LG’s spec is a D6500 white point that does not vary by more than 500°C over 20,000 hours, which represents about 7 years of viewing for the typical consumer. Oh said this is a tough spec, but it is being met. He also said that an oxygen/ moisture barrier for TV-sized panels is not the problem that I had thought it was. LG uses a 0.1-mm metal sheet and tests the seal by bending the panel 20,000 times without any problems.
http://informationdisplay.org/IDArchive/2014/SeptemberOctober/Materials.aspx
 
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