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That's true, but it's also true that he only uses an i1Pro2 for his spectro, "proudly" featured in his videos(!), which is rather sub-optimal for a professional.
Yeah he does use a i1pro2 but that shouldn't be used as a slight against his calibration and video knowledge in general, i have followed his reviews and he's quite good. What gear you own sometimes doesn't depend on just one factor, or being a professional. As a related example, the professional on this forum who does 4k blu ray disc reviews (ralph potts) uses a TCL LCD in his setup to evaluate 4k dolby vision discs. To me that doesn't make him a less of professional or untrustworthy of his assessment of the dolby vision picture quality.
 
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Yeah he does use a i1pro2 but that shouldn't be used as a slight against his calibration and video knowledge in general, i have followed his reviews and he's quite good. What gear you own sometimes doesn't depend on just one factor, or being a professional.
Sorry but that just exposes your lack of knowledge. No self-respecting professional calibrator would use a consumer i1pro2. And charge money to customers. Let alone admit it, or even boast about it! On the contrary, I've found it to be an extremely good indicator of video knowledge in general. If you're a pro, you need to use pro kit. No ifs or buts.
 

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When I look back on pretty much every single TV I’ve owned over the years post-CRT, I’ve always had uniformity issues to some degree.

Every OLED I ever tried, including two 2016 LG B6s, one Sony A1E, and one Sony A9F all had multiple bands that were too distracting too ignore and were promptly returned as a result.

But looking back on other TVs I owned and kept for extended periods, my old Panasonic plasmas (V10 and VT60, which I owned two of) both had some mild pink tinting, as well as some subtle vertical bands that popped up on grayish and light blue colors. My old Kuro 151 didn’t have any color issues, but had some pretty nasty DSE in the center of the screen that was hard to ignore. A lot of these issues I just had to learn to tolerate, much like the band on my A9G.

And of course, pretty much every LCD I’ve tried over the years, from the Sharp Elite, a few of Samsung’s earlier stabs at FALD, and even the Sony Z9D had some clouding that the zones couldn’t completely mask out under certain conditions.

On the other hand, I look at my iPhone XS in the dark with 5% and it looks flawless (unlike my iPhone X which looked like a typical bandy OLED). But then again, smaller screens always appear more uniform and any flaws usually aren’t as distracting anyway.

I remember saying that we’ll get to a point where uniformity will no longer be an issue.

That was about 14 years ago. The LCD issues were never fixed - while at least OLED has made some gains. So there's still some hope.
If I had to rate the cleanest 4K tv i have seen so far in terms of a uniform panel, i have followed 4k tv's since like the beginning of 2016, I would pick the sony XE93 (or X930 or whatever else it is called) lcd. It is an edge lit but in terms of contrast and black performance it performs like a FALD, coming to its uniformity, looks pure white on a 100% and very clean on 5% and lower. No FALD DSE blotches, no plasma stains, no oled jailbars. Sony scored a winner with that tv with uniformity.
 

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Sorry but that just exposes your lack of knowledge. No self-respecting professional calibrator would use a consumer i1pro2. And charge money to customers. Let alone admit it, or even boast about it! On the contrary, I've found it to be an extremely good indicator of video knowledge in general. If you're a pro, you need to use pro kit. No ifs or buts.
That's your opinion, clear that you dont see him in the same vein as i do, he still has plenty of readers of his tv reviews, with or without you. According to you a spectrophotometer model is what defines the expertise of an individual. By that logic, you might also not trust the professional opinion of the guy who does movie reviews over here when it comes to dv, because a tcl lcd tv may not be 'professional enough' in your books. Fine, you can continue to trust the professionals you want, those that meet your gear criteria.
 

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That's your opinion, clear that you dont see him in the same vein as i do, he still has plenty of readers of his tv reviews, with or without you. According to you a spectrophotometer model is what defines the expertise of an individual.
:rolleyes: False. Stop re-phrasing what I said to suit your argument, and then arguing against your version of it.

Using consumer kit whilst purporting to be a pro is a very good indicator. To me it's a "red flag", and in this case, it's a red flag I took heed of and started noticing various other short-cuts along the way. At the end of the day he's a journalist.

By that logic, you might also not trust the professional opinion of the guy who does movie reviews over here when it comes to dv, because a tcl lcd tv may not be 'professional enough' in your books. Fine, you can continue to trust the professionals you want, those that meet your gear criteria.
That's a lazy non-sequitur. You know full well that HDR reaching 1,000 nits cannot be projected so please stop comparing apples with oranges, it's dishonest and everyone can see that you are doing it.
 

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Sorry but that just exposes your lack of knowledge. No self-respecting professional calibrator would use a consumer i1pro2. And charge money to customers. Let alone admit it, or even boast about it! On the contrary, I've found it to be an extremely good indicator of video knowledge in general. If you're a pro, you need to use pro kit. No ifs or buts.
Actually, there are quite a few pros that only have i1pros and charge clients for their services. The person makes the meter/calibration not the other way around :)
 

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Actually, there are quite a few pros that only have i1pros and charge clients for their services. The person makes the meter/calibration not the other way around :)
Well now you've ruined it :) . I was coming from the point of view that a calibration can't be considered "reference" if it's not done using reference kit. You surely can't use sub-par kit and be "very good at it" to make up for all the kit's shortcomings? Some of the shortcomings, but not all of them? With modern displays this is more prescient.
 

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Well now you've ruined it :) .
LOL. Seriously though, John, aka jrref, was using an i1pro for his calibrations up until last year. It didn’t make him any worse of a calibrator. Jeff, aka umr, used an i1pro up until his retirement. Didn’t harm his reputation as one of the greatest calibrator ever. Even I started out with the i1pro and used it religiously for a few years :)
 

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I was coming from the point of view that a calibration can't be considered "reference" if it's not done using reference kit. You surely can't use sub-par kit and be "very good at it" to make up for all the kit's shortcomings? Some of the shortcomings, but not all of them? With modern displays this is more prescient.
I still will disagree with you. If one know the limitations of a meter AND knows how to compensate for them, where is the issue? Again— the person makes the meter/calibration, not the other way around. I’ve seen some really ****ty calibrations in my day from calibrator(s) that have the same PR-670 as I. At the same time, I’ve seen some excellent calibrations done from those with an i1pro.
 

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I still will disagree with you. If one know the limitations of a meter AND knows how to compensate for them, where is the issue? Again— the person makes the meter/calibration, not the other way around. I’ve seen some really ****ty calibrations in my day from calibrator(s) that have the same PR-670 as I. At the same time, I’ve seen some excellent calibrations done from those with an i1pro.
Fair enough. :)
 

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:rolleyes: False. Stop re-phrasing what I said to suit your argument, and then arguing against your version of it.

Using consumer kit whilst purporting to be a pro is a very good indicator. To me it's a "red flag", and in this case, it's a red flag I took heed of and started noticing other short-cuts along the way.



That's a lazy non-sequitur. You know full well that HDR reaching 1,000 nits cannot be projected so please stop comparing apples with oranges.
You're making a bigger deal than it really is, to ensue an argument about a guy that doesn't really belong in an oled uniformity discussion thread. I already told you, if you dont like the guy because he doesnt meet your criteria, then fine ignore him. He's still continue to have tons of readers of his reviews without you. There are several professional sources on the web, you are free to choose the sources that you trust and are comfortable with. I'm not taking an issue to it. Your personal likes or dislikes don't affect me in the least.
 
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You're making a bigger deal than it really is, to ensue an argument about a guy that doesn't really belong in an oled uniformity discussion thread. I already told you, if you dont like the guy because he doesnt meet your criteria, then fine ignore him. He's still continue to have tons of readers of his reviews without you. There are several professional sources on the web, you are free to choose the sources that you trust and are comfortable with. I'm not taking an issue to it. Your personal likes or dislikes don't affect me in the least.
Yet more utterly false accusations from you. Please just stop falsely accusing me. Everyone can see you are trolling. Now it's a new accusation of disliking someone, and of having personal dislikes. That's completely unwarranted, false, and unnecessary. I'm sure he's a perfectly nice guy. Why are you continuing this? See my reply to D-Nice above. It's already done. Shut up and stop lying, it's embarrassing. I've asked you to stop doing this, and I'm going to ask again. Stop with the falsehoods.
 

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Just to pile on a little here by going down a rabbit hole:
A profiled colorimeter is fine in this circumstance as long as it's profiled to the display with a spectroradiometer that has been calibrated to a NIST traceable light source. Colorimeters tend to drift more that spectroradiometers over time and have color accuracy issues below 1 or 2 fL (or at least the few I've come across and from the reports of our metrology guy on other brands). Luminance can also be off by a few % points at that level. Spectroradiometers (such as our PR-705s and OL-770s to a lesser degree than the 705) also have this low light performance issue as well but to a much lesser degree since many spectros use thermally regulated detectors and usually have larger aperture options to get a better signal at lower levels. For this reason at work, I usually rely on a photometer (1980A) below 1fL for accurate contrast calculations and verifying gamma curves.

In a nutshell, as long as the calibrator knows where and how far off their colorimeter drifts, it's just as effective as a spectroradiometer in this case. Plus, it would really suck to schlep a dual monochrometer such as an OL-750 around to everyone's house or studio if we took the radical stance of only using reference laboratory devices for TV calibrations.
 

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Two weeks old 65E9. 5% taken with iPhone camera.
I just want to point out that the 5% slide in thi video you have used seems to be brighter than this slide, which also commonly used:

Take a shot with this one too. Has anyone else in the group observed this? Let me know if I'm hallucinating.
 

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Just to pile on a little here by going down a rabbit hole:
A profiled colorimeter is fine in this circumstance as long as it's profiled to the display with a spectroradiometer that has been calibrated to a NIST traceable light source. Colorimeters tend to drift more that spectroradiometers over time and have color accuracy issues below 1 or 2 fL (or at least the few I've come across and from the reports of our metrology guy on other brands). Luminance can also be off by a few % points at that level. Spectroradiometers (such as our PR-705s and OL-770s to a lesser degree than the 705) also have this low light performance issue as well but to a much lesser degree since many spectros use thermally regulated detectors and usually have larger aperture options to get a better signal at lower levels. For this reason at work, I usually rely on a photometer (1980A) below 1fL for accurate contrast calculations and verifying gamma curves.

In a nutshell, as long as the calibrator knows where and how far off their colorimeter drifts, it's just as effective as a spectroradiometer in this case. Plus, it would really suck to schlep a dual monochrometer such as an OL-750 around to everyone's house or studio if we took the radical stance of only using reference laboratory devices for TV calibrations.
We are taking about spectros, not colormeters. The i1pro is a spectro:)
 

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Hi guys

Purchased a B9 about a week ago. It has had around 9 hours so far, so 2 auto cycles. Here are the pics of 3%, 5%, 10% and 100% respectively. Do you think it is a keeper? The camera seems to exaggerate a bit because I don't see any tint on the 100% white in real life. Also the blotches in the near blacks seems to have improved a little after the 2 auto cycles. Those were worse out of the box.

Cheers
Paul
I've seen way worse, but the proof is in the pudding. Do you see any of these panel anomalies in content?

Thanks for posting the pics! Part of what I appreciate about this thread is that it allows me to get a notion of the uniformity of other panels.
 
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