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Which flat screen TV, the OLED or the 4K gives a better picture quality and better reliability? The OLED is about twice the price of a 4K, does that mean the former will last twice longer? I understand the OLED technology is different, but does that justify the high price? Thank you all for your input.
 

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I don't think anyone could say which TV will last longer - although LCD has proved itself for many many years at this point, so if longevity without issue is your primary concern, a LCD TV would have a lessor chance of issue than an OLED.

The high price of OLED is simply because the technology is new, production costs are much higher with OLED than LCD, and of course, because of OLED's picture quality, it commands a price premium as well there also.

At least years shootout, a 1080p OLED won out over a 4K LCD for image quality. Sometime this year (perhaps more towards the end than the middle), there will be 4K OLED's, which of course will command quite a price premium. It all boils down to how much you are willing to spend and how long you are willing to wait...
 

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I'd like to mention that it's not a cut-and-dry comparison because you can have 4k OLED TVs just like you can have 1080p LCD TVs.

Just know that OLED > LCD and 4k > 1080p.

If you're going to be using actual native 4k content, it's even less clear-cut, especially for the likes of computer monitors and high-end PC gaming.
 

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Which flat screen TV, the OLED or the 4K gives a better picture quality and better reliability?
My opinion is that the future of high quality picture is with HDR, i.e., high dynamic range, TV. So if one of your choices is an HDR set, I'd say get that. Probably any HDR set this year, if you can even find one, is going to be expensive. (I'm holding off until at least a year from now.)
 

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The likes of HDR would depend on his viewing environment however - in a dark environment the higher static contrast of OLED could very well give an HDR-like image.
 

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Just get a 4K OLED TV. :)
 

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Which flat screen TV, the OLED or the 4K gives a better picture quality and better reliability? The OLED is about twice the price of a 4K, does that mean the former will last twice longer? I understand the OLED technology is different, but does that justify the high price? Thank you all for your input.
LCD has always been second best to plasma. Now it's 3rd best to plasma and OLED.

4K itself is entirely underrated. 1080P gives a great picture, so it's not fixing a problem. There's next to not 4k content available. Also, the tradeoffs in getting 4K means an inferior set. In that shootout, the 1080P sets were preferred over the 4K ones for the 4k content itself.

http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/result-201406013793.htm
 

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LCD has always been second best to plasma. Now it's 3rd best to plasma and OLED.

4K itself is entirely underrated. 1080P gives a great picture, so it's not fixing a problem. There's next to not 4k content available. Also, the tradeoffs in getting 4K means an inferior set. In that shootout, the 1080P sets were preferred over the 4K ones for the 4k content itself.

http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/result-201406013793.htm
Not when you get a UHD OLED.
 

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Yeah, the best 1080P plasma or 1080P OLED will look better then the best 4K LCD. There's no such thing as a 4K plasma, but a 4K OLED will look better then everything.
 

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I thought all OLED TV(s) made for 2015 will be UHD (4K) only.

I'm not understanding the "VS" of this thread; unless you want a previous model 1080p set which is no longer being made.
 

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Don't forget that at larger sizes, even with 1080p content, you'll get reduced aliasing on a 4k display.

Also consider that 720p upscaled to 2160p will always look better than 720p upscaled to 1080p (though the difference may be super uber-duper extremely minor at times)
 

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After ten years on this forum I must say that "HDfrickinR" is the most over-hyped feature ever marketed for TV when the FACT is there are ZERO standards for HDR and close to ZERO HDR Content to view on these QDot panels.

You can count on one hand the total HDR source and all manufacturers can promo anything as HDR capable when there aren't any standards to measure them by. This being so, you can view ALL content in one afternoon and then what do you do?

QDot was supposed to be a value proposition and save money yet a Samsung 78" SUHD sells for double what we can buy last years 78" HU9000 and a 65" UPP Price fixed panel is also DOUBLE. Samsung must be insane with this pricing strategy, while the economy is positive the growth in wages has been stagnant - declining for most of US.

My limited viewing of OLED of the 55" is that it's PQ is so damn good that were I in the market for a 55" that TV dominates anything else in the store presenting a close to 4K quality look.

2160P is a reality that is growing through the UHD alliance and Sony Consortium to promo production/camera's and distribution/streaming UHD with ten major partners and so that should be a target of consumers but HDR is about as real as a Vizio Ref series - does any TV carry a Dolby Vision HDR Certification anywhere on the planet? NO!

HDR capable for 2015 means about as much as flying cars were our future fifty years ago. For now, HDR is a good idea but simply that "an IDEA" that has virtually no manifestation of content to sell outside a handful. Would anyone subscribe to a HDR Library with a total of about four items? The "S" stands for Sucker UHD HDR Vaporware. HDR will be excellent but damn why pay that premium for something that's perhaps years away from reality. Silly!

Buy the best UHD that pleases you but choosing because of HDR is insane in 2015 and is throwing your money away for the next few years. We don't even have a UHD channel after a few years and yet now we're talking HDR with no library to speak of? HYPE!

To me, OLED w/4K will be the ticket w/xtd wrty to handle life cycle issue's that may occur - prefer 77" but out of present budget until it's under $10K. I likely may get a 75X910C for size/pq value but also buy a 55" OLED for the den/bedroom as I can do both for WAY cheaper than the 78" Samsung SuckerUHD. Interesting all the folks that bought Samsung for One Connect Upgradability, yet you cannot turn the panel magically into a QDot panel anymore than Sony, Sharp, LG can. Didn't do much good when the panel cannot be upgraded. Can't turn an LED into an OLED - so much for the Upgradability and future proofing Samsung promo's.

Not even FALD can touch OLED. ;)
 
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Yeah, the best 1080P plasma or 1080P OLED will look better then the best 4K LCD. There's no such thing as a 4K plasma, but a 4K OLED will look better then everything.
Not necessarily. 4K only makes a difference on a very large screen when you sit close. Most of the content is 1080P if that. TV series have just all changed back to DVD only in most cases for example. Upscaling 1080P to 4K doesn't do anything to improve the image. If it did, companies would be putting out shows in 16x9 pixels and upscaling from there.

That a screen of any technology is 4K doesn't necessarily make that image any better than a native 1080P set.

4K fixes a problem that isn't broken. Go read all of the bluray reviews on this forum. Notice how you don't see people complaining about how the video lacked detail? Yeah, that.

4K is largely marketing fluff from electronics companies struggling to keep the flat screen gravy train going. Now that everyone+dog has a flat screen, their market is completely different. It's helped them by driving the idiots who bought into LCD to trip over themselves to get a 4K LCD to 'upgrade'.
 

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Not necessarily. 4K only makes a difference on a very large screen when you sit close. Most of the content is 1080P if that. TV series have just all changed back to DVD only in most cases for example. Upscaling 1080P to 4K doesn't do anything to improve the image. If it did, companies would be putting out shows in 16x9 pixels and upscaling from there.

That a screen of any technology is 4K doesn't necessarily make that image any better than a native 1080P set.

4K fixes a problem that isn't broken. Go read all of the bluray reviews on this forum. Notice how you don't see people complaining about how the video lacked detail? Yeah, that.

4K is largely marketing fluff from electronics companies struggling to keep the flat screen gravy train going. Now that everyone+dog has a flat screen, their market is completely different. It's helped them by driving the idiots who bought into LCD to trip over themselves to get a 4K LCD to 'upgrade'.
You misunderstood my comment. I said a 4K *OLED* is better then everything else. Hell, a 1080P OLED is better then pretty much anything else too.
 

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Oh boy...

I've spelled out the math before and I'll do it again:
4k really doesn't matter at this point given that you have to have a huge TV and sit really close to notice a difference
Not true, otherwise 27" 5k monitors wouldn't be a thing.

Consider that typical monitor viewing distance is around 2-3 feet, so you would have the same visual resolution with a 54" 5k display at 4-6 feet, or a 40" 4k disply at the same 4-6 feet. That would equal an 80" 4k display at the typical 8-12 feet for TV watching, or a 40" 1080p TV at the same 8-12 feet; therefore a 4k panel on even "just" a 55" TV should give a benefit.

(I just measured my own TV setup, and it's in-line with the math above - a 39" 1080p TV that is viewed from at least 10 feet away)


Besides, the main point for 4k TVs right now is reduced aliasing, not increased detail resolution - the former of which doesn't actually require native 4k content.

Not only that, but with even a decently good upscaler, content does look better upscaled than displayed natively or heck it actually looks a teeny bit better even with basic integer-based nearest neighbor upscaling. For a while I had been thinking about making a thread dedicated to upscaling, and I may just finally bite the bullet and make it.
 

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For a while I had been thinking about making a thread dedicated to upscaling, and I may just finally bite the bullet and make it.
Please include up-HDRing. That's what I'm most curious about.
 

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Please include up-HDRing. That's what I'm most curious about.
I can't because the theoretical thread in question would be about actual existing and testable upscaling algorithms, which means they have to be available for use in software.

The idea wasn't an in-depth analysis and/or review but rather a comparison thread involving much user participation (similar to the OLED photo thread).
 

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Oh boy...

I've spelled out the math before and I'll do it again:



Not only that, but with even a decently good upscaler, content does look better upscaled than displayed natively or heck it actually looks a teeny bit better even with basic integer-based nearest neighbor upscaling. For a while I had been thinking about making a thread dedicated to upscaling, and I may just finally bite the bullet and make it.
Hahaha, sorry that dog won't hunt. If upscaling made content look better, than a DVD would look better than a bluray. YOu'd have people making content at 16x9 pixels and just let the upscaling improve things. You'd also have consoles and PC video gamers playing games at the lowest settings and having them upscaled. Upscalers can do a good job of upscaling without losing detail, but it's not remotely the same thing.
 

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If upscaling made content look better, than a DVD would look better than a bluray.
Oh, that's what you meant? Well yeah, of course upscaling will look worse.

What I meant was that upscaling, say, 1080p to 2160p on a 65" 4k display will look better than natively viewing the same 1080p content on a 65" 1080p display.

Thetwo exceptions to this is if a particularly poor and blurry upscaler is used, or the video content is the likes of a computer GUI where nearest-neighbor can look better more consistantly.
 
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