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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello..newbie here and looking for some help.


I purchased a house and was thrilled to find out that there was a On Q box and all bedrooms/family room having an ethernet port.

Now the question is that how can I get the ethernet ports in each room to work?! Unfortunately I have no clue where to start from and it might be easier to get someone to do it for me but I am really keen to learn and do it myself.


The tech from the cable company said that the signal from the service provider comes into the attic and from there he bypassed the OnQ setup and used a separate coxial cable for the internet which then connects to the modem in my office. The ethernet port is not being used. He said I could just plug the ethernet cable from the modem into the wall and it should make all other ports in the house 'live' but that did not work.


I took some pictures of the On Q box. Can someone help me figure out what I need to do to get to use the outputs. I am assuming I need to hook up my modem here but not sure where exactly. I have done a lot of google searches to no avail and hoping some experts can chime in and help out.


Thanks in advance!




 

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Assuming your modem is also a "router" (does it provide WiFi wireless and/or have more the one Ethernet output?), you can patch one line from your study back to the OnQ enclosure. Add any simple Ethernet switch there, and patch the rest of the house (any of the rooms shown on the yellow wires attached to the RJ45 block) using short patch cables from the switch.


5-port 10/100 Ethernet switches are $10 from Newegg. Upgrade to Gigabit (mostly for future use) for an additional $10...


If your modem is not a router, there will be a little more work involved, and geez I wish the cable guys would just wire these correctly when the house has the structured wiring in place instead of bypassing it so it's like every other pre-2000 house...


Jeff
 

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normally you would put the modem in that central location and then route the signal to the rooms, but he was saying that you could use the run going to your office to route the signal back to the central location and then to the other rooms. you would plug the ethernet cable from the modem into the wall jack in the office. Then back at the central location you can find the line coming from the office on the black patch panel (with the yellow cables). you would plug a short one from there into a router or switch, probably an 8 port switch because then you don't really have to worry which one is which. but if you wanted to plug it into a wireless router you would have to make sure that the line from the office port of the black patch panel goes into the Modem port of the router.


if you have power near that enclosure, you could order a little cisco 8-port soho switch and 7 patch cables 1' long and plug every port of the black patch panel into the switch.



edit: what he said ^^
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys..it makes so much sense now!


The router is not wireless and there is a power outlet in the laundry room where the ON Q box is. I am wondering if it wil be a cleaner set up if I move the router to the laundry room and reroute the coaxial wire from office to laundry room and attach it to the modem. Then from modem as you mentioned attach the Ethernet cable to the ON Q switch. I am assuming this way I would not need to get another switch or patch wires?
 

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If your modem is truly a router and has multiple Ethernet jacks, then, yes, that would be the "correct" way to wire it in the first place...


You'll still need some short patch cables to connect between the RJ45 patch panel and the modem. Monoprice is your friend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23204518


If your modem is truly a router and has multiple Ethernet jacks, then, yes, that would be the "correct" way to wire it in the first place...


You'll still need some short patch cables to connect between the RJ45 patch panel and the modem. Monoprice is your friend.

Unfortunately there is only one Ethernet jack in the modem so I will buy the switch. Thinking of this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=33-704-042&IsVirtualParent=1

Was checking out monoprice and there prices are unreal so will def get the cables from them.


Hopefully this week I should have something positive to report back on.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalodada  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23204544


Unfortunately there is only one Ethernet jack in the modem so I will buy the switch. Thinking of this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=33-704-042&IsVirtualParent=1

Was checking out monoprice and there prices are unreal so will def get the cables from them.


Hopefully this week I should have something positive to report back on.
One Ethernet port on the cable modem, says it's a cable modem only. To connect multiple devices, you would need a router connected to it. Whether you want wireless or not determines where that router would be located. If you want wireless capabilities in your home, connect a wireless router to your cable modem, with one of the LAN ports going to your computer and another of the LAN ports plugging into the wall outlet to go back to the OnQ panel, where you will have a switch for distribution to all of the other outlets in the house.


Just as asecat described above.
 

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Just FYI you DO NOT need a wireless router (hate that designation) to have wireless access in your home. You can, instead, use wireless access points (WAP or AP). By using separate devices for your router and wireless access points you can place each in the best location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks acesat and egnisn. I have ordered the above mentioned switch...heck ordered 2 so I can hook up my entire entertainment center and got a few cables from mono price.


Fcwilt - I'm new to this networking thing ( as you might have seen). What would I need to set up these access points? Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalodada  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23208080



Fcwilt - I'm new to this networking thing ( as you might have seen). What would I need to set up these access points? Thanks

Uh... An Access Point? Just kidding.


Consider:


Cable-From-Internet-Provider --> Modem --> Router --> Switch --> To-Other-Equipment-In-Your-Home


This is your basic WIRED setup.


Often the internet provider will provide an "All-In-One" device that includes the functions of the Modem, Router, Switch and Wireless Access Point.


I don't care for this approach because I prefer to select separate devices to meet the needs of my installation and provide best-in-class performance, something you are not likely to get from the All-In-One device.


To add WiFi to the basic setup above you would buy and install one or more wireless access points. These WAPs will connect to your Switch via a network cable. You place the WAP where desired to give the best coverage.


In my home the Modem, Router and Switch (actually 2) are located in the basement in a dedicated utility closet. From the switches cables run to different rooms in the home, anywhere I thought I might have a device needing a network connection. I also ran cables to several locations in the house and installed ceiling mounted WAPs that look a bit like smoke detectors.


JFYI in those locations where I thought I might have a TV (and associated equipment) I ran 4 CAT6 cables and 4 RG6 cables. In those locations where I thought I might have a computer workstation I ran 2 CAT6. In other places where I already knew what was being installed (security system, etc) I ran cables suited to the type of equipment.


If you take it step by step it's fairly simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23208154


Uh... An Access Point? Just kidding.


Consider:


Cable-From-Internet-Provider --> Modem --> Router --> Switch --> To-Other-Equipment-In-Your-Home


This is your basic WIRED setup.


Often the internet provider will provide an "All-In-One" device that includes the functions of the Modem, Router, Switch and Wireless Access Point.


I don't care for this approach because I prefer to select separate devices to meet the needs of my installation and provide best-in-class performance, something you are not likely to get from the All-In-One device.


To add WiFi to the basic setup above you would buy and install one or more wireless access points. This WAP will connect to your Switch via a network cable. You place the WAP where desired to give the best coverage.


In my home the Modem, Router and Switch (actually 2) are located in the basement in a dedicated utility closet. From the switches cables run to different rooms in the home, anywhere I thought I might have a device needing a network connection. I also ran cables to several locations in the house and installed ceiling mounted WAP,s that look a bit like smoke detectors.


JFYI in those locations where I thought I might have a TV (and associated equipment) I ran 4 CAT6 cables and 4 RG6 cables. In those locations where I thought I might have a computer workstation I ran 2 CAT6. In other places where I already knew what was being installed (security system, etc) I ran cables suited to the type of equipment.


If you take it step by step it's fairly simple.

Gotcha. I read up on how to set this up and it seems pretty straight forward. Might tackle it once I have the initial setup working.


Thanks for taking the time to help out. I can't wait to get everything sorted this weekend.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23207656


Just FYI you DO NOT need a wireless router (hate that designation) to have wireless access in your home. You can, instead, use wireless access points (WAP or AP). By using separate devices for your router and wireless access points you can place each in the best location.
That is very true. A wireless router is not needed. A regular router with an Access Point would do just fine. However, most wired routers I've seen cost a little more than wireless routers do, then you add the expense of an AP, and you've spent more than if you just got a wireless router in the first place (for actually less capability, since the AP will take up one of your switch ports).


If your cabling is such that you can do so, get a wired router AND a wireless router. Turn off DHCP in the wireless router, and you've got an Access Point with a 4-port switch.


In the OP's scenario, where the cable modem is located in a room other than where the panel is, a wireless router where the cable modem is with one of the LAN ports going to a switch in the panel makes the most sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got my routers and cables delivered today and followed the instructions provided and everything hooked up as expected. The only issue encountered was when I connected the cable from the wireless modem into the wall then the Internet connection dropped altogether. So I used the voyage ethernet outlet, from the vonage device which is connected to the wireless modem, to connect to the outlet in the wall and it worked.


Thanks again to everyone who contributed and helped me set my network! Cheers!!
 

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I'd like to piggy back on koldada's post and issue...


I have a similar layout and I'm a bit confused what I need to do...


I have my cable modem hooked into a wireless router with multiple ethernet "outs". I have taken one of the lines and plugged it into my office ethernet outlet...


Now what?? All of the lines come to the On Q central location, but I don't get a signal through the remaining ethernet ports in the home...Is there something I need to connect within the central location in order to have the signal travel through the remaining lines?
 

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You didn't read very far in the thread...



See post #2. You need an inexpensive Ethernet switch at the OnQ box to connect all of rooms together. It's a "power strip" for Ethernet.
 

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sorry, but, I'm confused on how a switch works there...I have stripped wires connected to the main hub (not your normal ethernet 'plugs') as diagramed in the original post.


I'm a newbie on this, so, how exactly do I get the stripped wires connected to the switch?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyheel  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23687283


sorry, but, I'm confused on how a switch works there...I have stripped wires connected to the main hub (not your normal ethernet 'plugs') as diagramed in the original post.


I'm a newbie on this, so, how exactly do I get the stripped wires connected to the switch?

Get an OnQ "Network Module" which will allow you to punch down the wires onto the module and provide RJ45 jacks. There are a couple of modules, this one is the 5-port version (and is the cheapest of the lot):

http://www.amazon.com/On-Q-Legrand-AC1000-Network-Interface/dp/B000JWQJX6


Then some 1-2' RJ45 patch cables to your switch.


You'll need a punch tool, a cheap one will work for a small job like this.
 

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I guess this is where I am confused...why do I need RJ45 jacks within the module? I have ports throughout the house that I want to use. I don't need any in the closet where the module is located. Is the "network module" used to connect all of the wires together?


I really have no idea what to do with the device you linked me to.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23687559


Get an OnQ "Network Module" which will allow you to punch down the wires onto the module and provide RJ45 jacks. There are a couple of modules, this one is the 5-port version (and is the cheapest of the lot):

http://www.amazon.com/On-Q-Legrand-AC1000-Network-Interface/dp/B000JWQJX6


Then some 1-2' RJ45 patch cables to your switch.


You'll need a punch tool, a cheap one will work for a small job like this.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyheel  /t/1468310/on-q-home-system-totally-confused-and-need-help#post_23688178


I guess this is where I am confused...why do I need RJ45 jacks within the module? I have ports throughout the house that I want to use. I don't need any in the closet where the module is located. Is the "network module" used to connect all of the wires together?


I really have no idea what to do with the device you linked me to.

You need an Ethernet switch to connect multiple devices together to form a network. Ethernet is a point-to-point link. All Ethernet switches have RJ45 jacks to connect devices - for example, 5-port switches are common, which allow you to connect 5 Ethernet devices (including a router) together into a network. When we want to network the whole house, those connections are made through the house wiring and RJ45 jacks in the rooms.


For ease of use and "neatness", we terminate the wiring in the central location in a "patch panel", and use RJ45 patch cables to connect to equipment.


Now, you could simply terminate those cables with RJ45 jacks and plug them into the Ethernet switch. There are slip-through EZ-RJ45 jacks that can make that a bit easier, but you'll still need tools and practice to make those terminations correctly. The issue with doing this on the house wiring is that if you mess it up enough times and have to cut off the connectors - you might come up with a wire that's too short to reach its destination!
 
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