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I had some problems with (when i used the video scaler) the 876 that after

1-2 hours it started to put the TV on black for some seconds.

I found that the back part of the case, where the video scaler is, felt very hot.

The 876 was running at 47-48 C.


What i did was that i put 3x 12cm Cooler Master case fans on top and the temp started to drop to 38-39 C !

The 3x 12cm fans fit exact on the opening for hot air outlet on top.

I had the fans running on 3 volt and 4.5 volt so i could (almost) not hear them, 4.5 volt will even go 2 C lower then 3 volts du to the higher fan speed.

And when i cover (yes > COVER > And my problem with the TV going to black is GONE :)


So i can only conclude that the Onkyo is running to hot (maybe only on specific settings) and that the use of computer case fans on top is a solution to get the temp down, far down......


Now i have 3x 12cm Cooler Master running on 4.5 volt, tomorrow i will get 3x 12cm Scythe Slip Stream 120mm -800 RPM -10.7 dB on 12 volt.

Lets see what these very silent fans will du to the temp on 4.5 or 6 volt....
 

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I'm having the same problem, I just received this about 10 days ago. While watching the new Batman movie about 3/4 way through the rec.shut now, was able to turn it back on and it stayed on, top of rec. was so hot you could not leave your hand on it. The next day I found out how to excess the Temp. and it got up to 54C. I'm just useing the pass through for my PS3. I'm interested in how you set these fans up, where are you getting the low voltage from? Would like to see a pic. Thanks.

Catbird
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CATBIRD /forum/post/15413936


I'm having the same problem, I just received this about 10 days ago. While watching the new Batman movie about 3/4 way through the rec.shut now, was able to turn it back on and it stayed on, top of rec. was so hot you could not leave your hand on it. The next day I found out how to excess the Temp. and it got up to 54C. I'm just useing the pass through for my PS3. I'm interested in how you set these fans up, where are you getting the low voltage from? Would like to see a pic. Thanks.

Catbird

You will need a wall wort(power converter) from 110 volts to 12v,9v,6v. They are cheap. Also recommend at least a 120mm fan. Some of these are extra quiet and you won't be ables to hear them depending on makes and models. These are both available from a computer shop near you. Plug the wall wort into the back of the receiver if possible so that it will only come on when the receiver is powered up. Also be sure fan is positioned where it is the hottest part of your receiver and it is pulling hot air from the receiver and not blowing into the receiver. Clean fan as needed due to dust build up.
 

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faulty design if you have to add external fans to it to make it run properly. Especially on something that expensive, imagine the problems down the road. Return that for a Pioneer, it barely gets warm to the touch.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goatse /forum/post/15414235


faulty design if you have to add external fans to it to make it run properly. Especially on something that expensive, imagine the problems down the road. Return that for a Pioneer, it barely gets warm to the touch.

How expensive was your computer? How many fans does it need to keep cool? There is a hell of a lot more processing going into a receiver than your computer. Most receivers that have a lot of power will run hot when pushed, so whats wrong with adding external cooling to help cool the thing off. I would be more concerned with a receiver that did not run warm to hot than one that stays "cool" when pushed. That sounds like a receiver that doesn't come close to the specs as stated for it. The only exception may be the receivers with the ICE amps. So buy the fans and worry about the little crap problably much later.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrted46 /forum/post/15414272


I just ordered one of these guys...I hope I do not run into this problem!


My unit will not be in a cabinet and have plenty of clearance on each side so I hope that helps.

Get the fans and don't worry about it overheating. Its worth the investment.
 

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Go look in the Onkyo 705 thread. The 1st post is a FAQ, including links to fans that 705 and 805 users (including myself) have bought and use.


My 805 barely gets warm anymore, after used a pull fan above the HDMI ports.


Seggers
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 /forum/post/15414322


How expensive was your computer? How many fans does it need to keep cool? There is a hell of a lot more processing going into a receiver than your computer. Most receivers that have a lot of power will run hot when pushed, so whats wrong with adding external cooling to help cool the thing off. I would be more concerned with a receiver that did not run warm to hot than one that stays "cool" when pushed. That sounds like a receiver that doesn't come close to the specs as stated for it. The only exception may be the receivers with the ICE amps. So buy the fans and worry about the little crap problably much later.


Thats kind of a bad example. Computers come built with all the cooling fans as needed, you don't have to add additional ugly fans outside. Besides, maybe amp section on the onkyo is designed to run on the heat, but secondary chips like DSPs and video processors are clearly not. If you know anything about electronics, they do not like heat.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by CATBIRD

I'm having the same problem, I just received this about 10 days ago. While watching the new Batman movie about 3/4 way through the rec.shut now, was able to turn it back on and it stayed on, top of rec. was so hot you could not leave your hand on it. The next day I found out how to excess the Temp. and it got up to 54C. I'm just useing the pass through for my PS3. I'm interested in how you set these fans up, where are you getting the low voltage from? Would like to see a pic. Thanks.

Catbird



Thanks Phantom52 for the input and everyone else as well. My unit is not even a cabinet, sits on the top shelf. I'm going to try the fan, will pick up one tomorrow and take for a test ride over the holidays and I'll let you know. This rec.just replaced my Harmon Kardon AVR-8000 it also ran very hot but never shut down on me.

Catbird
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goatse /forum/post/15415000


Thats kind of a bad example. Computers come built with all the cooling fans as needed, you don't have to add additional ugly fans outside. Besides, maybe amp section on the onkyo is designed to run on the heat, but secondary chips like DSPs and video processors are clearly not. If you know anything about electronics, they do not like heat.

How is it a bad example. Not all computers are built equally. If so why are there so many additional units for processors,video cards, and other peripherials for a PC, much less a HTPC. Yes I know they don't like heat but a good receiver as well as a good computer can always use additional cooling and I don't feel it has anything to do with build quality. Beside the amp section of a good receiver the hottest section of the receiver will be the HDMI section of it. A good 120mm fan is a cheap cure for receivers that do run overly hot.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 /forum/post/15414222


You will need a wall wort(power converter) from 110 volts to 12v,9v,6v. They are cheap. Also recommend at least a 120mm fan. Some of these are extra quiet and you won't be ables to hear them depending on makes and models. These are both available from a computer shop near you. Plug the wall wort into the back of the receiver if possible so that it will only come on when the receiver is powered up. Also be sure fan is positioned where it is the hottest part of your receiver and it is pulling hot air from the receiver and not blowing into the receiver. Clean fan as needed due to dust build up.

Do you open the unit and place the fan inside the chasis or do you mount/place it outside the unit?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 /forum/post/15415839


How is it a bad example. Not all computers are built equally. If so why are there so many additional units for processors,video cards, and other peripherials for a PC, much less a HTPC. Yes I know they don't like heat but a good receiver as well as a good computer can always use additional cooling and I don't feel it has anything to do with build quality. Beside the amp section of a good receiver the hottest section of the receiver will be the HDMI section of it. A good 120mm fan is a cheap cure for receivers that do run overly hot.

why are you comparing custom home built computer to a mass market electronics?? Its pretty much a fact that Onkyos are not reliable, just on first page alone there are a few threads about Onkyo design problems.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goatse /forum/post/15416114


why are you comparing custom home built computer to a mass market electronics?? Its pretty much a fact that Onkyos are not reliable, just on first page alone there are a few threads about Onkyo design problems.

What exactly are the design problems? The biggest problem I see is user error. While there have been some faulty units for sure (as with all brands) even with seasoned members, most issues I see are from noobs. People come to these boards for the first time when they have a problem.


Even if you could have 100 instances of issues here, that would be a drop in the bucket compared to how many of these units are out there working perfectly. Onkyo was really the first lineup of units with onboard decoders, and they did at least an ok job for being the first. Look at some of the other higher end brands, and you'll see HDMI headaches as well.


Heat is only an issue if you can't give them ventilation. Large AB amps simply make a lot of heat.


Among and within my stuff are 5x class D amps, 2 large AB mch amps, an class A integrated. Would you tell someone with a $6,000 Pass Labs class A amp that their unit has bad design because it runs hot?


Onkyo has recently provided perhaps the most power for the buck in receivers, in recent memory. It doesn't surprise me at all that the 806 is a large downgrade in amplifier section from the 805. Why? Because people rather have a cooler unit than a stronger amplifier section.


You couldn't pay me to trade your Pioneer for my Onkyo 805 that I got for $600. The Audyssey MultEQ XT is something that I would not let go of, and I don't care how cool your unit runs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jostenmeat /forum/post/15416238


What exactly are the design problems? The biggest problem I see is user error. While there have been some faulty units for sure (as with all brands) even with seasoned members, most issues I see are from noobs. People come to these boards for the first time when they have a problem.

lol, just 10 minutes later, here's a first timer with an Onkyo issue. Bad design Goatse?

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1102175
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goatse /forum/post/15416114


why are you comparing custom home built computer to a mass market electronics?? Its pretty much a fact that Onkyos are not reliable, just on first page alone there are a few threads about Onkyo design problems.

Because I used a "hot" Onkyo 696 when they came out and it is still in use today for another setup and is still running just fine after 6+ years. I now have a Yamaha 2600 and have threads where it also tends to run hot. What good receiver that puts out anywhere close to what it is suppose to do does not run hot. And when I say what its supposed to do I'm not talking about a claim of 140W/channel and actually doing apprx. 77 watts with only 2 channels driven. H/K is one of the very few whose amps do deliver, but I would not have one because of their other problems. Denon, please give me a break. Pioneer maybe with their ICE amps, haven't read enough professional reviews. I am not claiming I have the best on the market(2600) but I will tell you it was the only one I could find at the time that even came close to its claims. 130x7 (122 watts/2 ch driven) and preout vrms of 4.55. So you tell me what I should buy today that comes close and does not cost $5000+. You will only see people on these threads(for the most part) who are experiencing problems with their equipment and seeking help. You are also seeing a very small portions of them and not the thousands that are actually using these with no problems at all. Also, not all HTPC's are custom built. you can actually buy them from any computer maker out there. BUT, I also assure you most of them will also add more cooling and other add-ons.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phantom52 /forum/post/15414322


How expensive was your computer? How many fans does it need to keep cool? There is a hell of a lot more processing going into a receiver than your computer. Most receivers that have a lot of power will run hot when pushed, so whats wrong with adding external cooling to help cool the thing off. I would be more concerned with a receiver that did not run warm to hot than one that stays "cool" when pushed. That sounds like a receiver that doesn't come close to the specs as stated for it. The only exception may be the receivers with the ICE amps. So buy the fans and worry about the little crap problably much later.

ummm, I would have to disagree with the amount of processing going on compared to a current model computer. That is actually quite a stretch. There is probably more processing power in a mid-level video card alone while not even taking into account the cpu.


It is hard to believe that Onkyo didn't put at least a heatsink on the Reon processor considering how hot it gets. It seems like a bad idea considering how cheap a small heatsink would be. Obviously they feel that it isn't an issue, but maybe the OP's issue would have never occurred if a $5 heatsink was thrown on there.


BTW, my computer has zero fans. It uses a specially designed enclosure where the entire case acts like one giant heatsink. It isn't much different than some amps that use a similar approach.
 

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Here's another noob who sent his Onkyo back. It arrived with a dead amp but one nice feature that almost saved it was that it was just the right size for a 12" skillet.


This noob grew tired long ago of poorly engineered heat sink and cooling designs after having to constantly re-solder a 12v power rail to the back of my old Gateway plasma and velcro fans to the back because the heat rising from below would actually melt it. Someone actually paid someone money to put a primary heat sink 1" below a plastic molex connecter.


I knew of these problems with the Onkyo but found too good of a price to pass up and took a chance anyway. I am thankful the amp was dead, it gave me a chance to buy a NAD T-775 - which sounds wonderful and I could change a baby on top of it.
 
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