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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Onkyo TX-DS939 Receiver and the other day I was trying to hook up my PS3 to our TV, so I was fiddling around behind the entertainment center. One of the ends of the center channel speaker was a bit frayed and when I was moving things around it touched the other terminal of the speaker; i.e. causing a short. The unit was powered on at the time, but it wasn't playing anything.


Now of course all the displays shows is "Protect" and shuts off. I tried resetting it to factory settings using the "Hold CD button and press the Video-1 button" as the service manual said. It did say "Clear" but still shut off after displaying that message.


Now, do you think this issue is user-serviceable like replacing a fuse? Or do you think the problem goes deeper than that and can only be fixed by a technician? If I can't fix it myself, what do you think the cost estimate of repair would be?

I live in the US by the way.


Any sort of assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
 

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It's probably not a fuse as a fuse would most likely be used for the power supply. I doubt the amp has it's own fuse. But I could be wrong. Amps usually use capacitors in parallel to protect against voltage spikes. But a shorting of wires isn't a voltage spike. It's a resistance drop.


Open the sucker up and see if anything looks burnt or any fuses are blown. Maybe there's a circuit breaker that needs to be reset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I can't figure out how to get the faceplate off without damaging anything. To remove the cover on mine, that must also come off to get to the rest of the screws.


I have a feeling this won't be an easy fix though. I'm no electrical engineer. What do you think the cost estimate to fix this would be? Like I said it's a short-out from the center channel speaker.
 

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There must be a way to open the unit without removing the faceplate. Usually the cage around the sides and top has screws on the bottom and/or back holding it in place.


The cost to repair depends on what's broken and how easy it is to identify the problem. If you blew the amp, it's probably not worth repairing.
 
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