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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Hi all, I just bought a used Onkyo TX-SR601 on ebay. I didn't see very many reviews. I know this is an older model. Does anybody here own this receiver? If so, what has your experience been with it? I plan to use this to drive a pair of bookshelf speakers in my bedroom mainly to play the sound from my laptop (my wife and I watch movies on the laptop, so the hope is to have the sound from the laptop go digitally into the receiver so that the receiver's DAC can be used for better sound quality). 

 

Thanks.
 

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Well - let us know if its any good. You might have been better off asking first...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Originally Posted by Knucklehead90  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24018382


Well - let us know if its any good. You might have been better off asking first...
 

Yea I know but I just saw it on ebay and there were 3 mins remaining and I pulled the trigger on impulse after a quick look up on google. 
 

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You'd probably be better off using a nice stereo receiver if you're just doing music listening/2-channel -- that's what I did with my dedicated music listening room, where I got a beautiful Onkyo TX-8555 stereo receiver at 100 watts x 2 (this unit has since been discontinued and was the last of Onkyo's "all business" stereo receivers that acted more like integrated amps). If you can, try to track down someone selling an 8555 or similar stereo model...


FWIW, I had the predecessor to the 601, the TX-SR600, in my very first surround system and I still have it, powering a small system in my house's workout room with two Polk R15s...the receiver is still kicking all these years later even surviving a cross-country move, EXTREMELY hot weather conditions in storage and sustaining a nasty dent in its side...


So, I suppose, now that I'm thinking about it, that you can use the 601 for straight two channel music playback (well, of course you CAN use it for that) as I'm doing with my 600 running it in stereo, but I just thought it may have been better for you to hunt down a specifically tailored for music stereo receiver...


Good luck, at any rate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Originally Posted by afrogt  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24018817


What kind of digital audio output does your laptop have? Optical? Digital coax?

Not sure, tbh. What do most laptopscome with these days? I have a 2013 Thinkpad X230. Will look it up wheni get home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by IntelliVolume  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24018849


You'd probably be better off using a nice stereo receiver if you're just doing music listening/2-channel -- that's what I did with my dedicated music listening room, where I got a beautiful Onkyo TX-8555 stereo receiver at 100 watts x 2 (this unit has since been discontinued and was the last of Onkyo's "all business" stereo receivers that acted more like integrated amps). If you can, try to track down someone selling an 8555 or similar stereo model...


FWIW, I had the predecessor to the 601, the TX-SR600, in my very first surround system and I still have it, powering a small system in my house's workout room with two Polk R15s...the receiver is still kicking all these years later even surviving a cross-country move, EXTREMELY hot weather conditions in storage and sustaining a nasty dent in its side...


So, I suppose, now that I'm thinking about it, that you can use the 601 for straight two channel music playback (well, of course you CAN use it for that) as I'm doing with my 600 running it in stereo, but I just thought it may have been better for you to hunt down a specifically tailored for music stereo receiver...


Good luck, at any rate!

Thanks. I asked the seller if he would let me cancel my bid. I think it would be better for me to get a newer model, maybe the Sony str dh840. I only paid 66 for the onkyo, so I wouldn't be too disappointed of he doesn't let me cancel my bid.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VS85  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24018945


Thanks. I asked the seller if he would let me cancel my bid. I think it would be better for me to get a newer model, maybe the Sony str dh840. I only paid 66 for the onkyo, so I wouldn't be too disappointed of he doesn't let me cancel my bid.

Do yourself a favor and STAY AWAY from Sony receivers -- their video products (TVs) and portable devices are another thing, but don't buy their receivers. The stereo models are made especially cheap and you'd be better off with either keeping the Onkyo or looking for the model I recommended, the awesome TX-8555 stereo receiver (you'd have to find this used though; Onkyo just recently discontinued it but it's great with tons of power and a nice, professional looking aluminum front).

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by IntelliVolume  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24018967



Do yourself a favor and STAY AWAY from Sony receivers -- their video products (TVs) and portable devices are another thing, but don't buy their receivers. The stereo models are made especially cheap and you'd be better off with either keeping the Onkyo or looking for the model I recommended, the awesome TX-8555 stereo receiver (you'd have to find this used though; Onkyo just recently discontinued it but it's great with tons of power and a nice, professional looking aluminum front).

 

 

A poster in this very thread advised me not to buy an Onkyo product at any cost (he said that in the other Onkyo 601 thread). Now you've said the same thing about Sony but you say that Onkyo is fine. I'm sure there are people here who hate Denon or Harmon Kardon. 

 

If I had the extra money, I would buy the Harmon Kardon HK 3490 stereo receiver. I'm looking for something under $200. Two models that caught my attention were the Denon AVR 200 and the Sony STR-DH840 (both $199). I compared features and thought that Sony had everything that I want in a receiver for my bedroom. Most reviews are overwhelmingly positive:

 

1)  http://www.amazon.com/Sony-STR-DH540-Channel-Receiver-Black/dp/B00BHC7ZT4/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1385947352&sr=1-1&keywords=sony+str+840

 

2)  http://www.crutchfield.com/S-sD3JCk8hdSz/p_158STDH540/Sony-STR-DH540.html

 

The closest model I could find to your recommendation is:  http://www.accessories4less.com/make-a-store/item/ONKTX8255/Onkyo-TX-8255-50-watts-2-channel-Stereo-Receiver/1.html?gclid=CLPsicKwkLsCFUiDfgodKxgA6w  

 

Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VS85  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24019441



A poster in this very thread advised me not to buy an Onkyo product at any cost (he said that in the other Onkyo 601 thread). Now you've said the same thing about Sony but you say that Onkyo is fine. I'm sure there are people here who hate Denon or Harmon Kardon.

Point taken -- but let me tell you this, from experience: Denon and Harmon Kardon aren't Sony when it comes to receivers, believe me. Stick to the Onkyo I told you about or look into their latest networking stereo models like the 8050:




Or their new 8020:




Or their older but still worthwhile 8255 which retains the company's classic faceplate look and gold badging (unlike the above models that keep in line with their "new" styling design) as well as a family resemblance to my 8555, but with less power:



Quote:
If I had the extra money, I would buy the Harmon Kardon HK 3490 stereo receiver. I'm looking for something under $200. Two models that caught my attention were the Denon AVR 200 and the Sony STR-DH840 (both $199). I compared features and thought that Sony had everything that I want in a receiver for my bedroom. Most reviews are overwhelmingly positive:


1)  http://www.amazon.com/Sony-STR-DH540-Channel-Receiver-Black/dp/B00BHC7ZT4/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1385947352&sr=1-1&keywords=sony+str+840


2)  http://www.crutchfield.com/S-sD3JCk8hdSz/p_158STDH540/Sony-STR-DH540.html

Well, if you wanna go by some Crutchfield and Amazon "reviews" (
) be my guest...but I would highly advise against a Sony receiver even if you have a limited budget; you'd be better off with the Harmon Kardon (I personally don't like the look of the company's stuff with all the plastic on the components and such) as I have heard they're pretty powerful or trying to track down a used Outlaw stereo receiver model (I think their stereo receiver is out of your budget)...

Yes -- the 8255 is one of the models I outlined above for you to consider...this is probably your best bet, as this unit is built solidly, boasts an anti-resonant aluminum faceplate and most likely all the power you're going to need. The 8255 is pretty much the same thing as my 8555, only mine boosts power to 100 watts per channel and boasts a heavy, smooth roator volume control knob that's solid aluminum compared to the 8255's more traditional "level pointing" knob...
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Thanks.

No problem.
 

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You will hear good and bad about every brand depending on the person's experience. Through the years I have owned Sony, Onkyo, Denon and Marantz. I like the Denon and the Marantz the best, but all of them worked well for me. I really liked my Onkyo 809 as well but my friend had to have his Onkyo 606 repaired twice. So you just never know. On another note, my dad has two Yamahas and he really likes them. 

 

The bottom line is electronics can be fickle and sometimes you get a bad unit and when that happens it can leave a bad taste in your mouth. That's usually when you will find people telling you to avoid the brand that they had trouble with. 

 

Personally I really like Marantz and Denon with the Audyssey room calibration. Onkyo also has the Audyssey system and like I said, my Onkyo worked fine but my friend's did not. Also I would not buy a stereo receiver because I have learned through time that if I limit myself today with something then I can almost guarantee you that tomorrow I will wish I hadn't. I would buy a 5.1 channel capable AVR simply because in a few years you may find yourself wishing you could use the receiver to set up a secondary HT or something (happened to me). But that's me, your milage may vary. 
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopinater  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24019695


You will hear good and bad about every brand depending on the person's experience. Through the years I have owned Sony, Onkyo, Denon and Marantz. I like the Denon and the Marantz the best, but all of them worked well for me. I really liked my Onkyo 809 as well but my friend had to have his Onkyo 606 repaired twice. So you just never know.

I would have fallen into the Marantz camp as well but since going with a few of their audio components that didn't last, it's a brand I wouldn't look to. I owned a CD recorder -- the very first consumer grade model on the market back in like '98 or so -- and a few CD changers all of which gave me problems and crapped out (my current CC4001 in my two channel system doesn't keep its programming which is RIDICULOUSLY annoying when I have five discs programmed in sequence to feed off to my TASCAM CD burning deck...).
Quote:
On another note, my dad has two Yamahas and he really likes them. 

You're lucky to even have your dad -- mine passed away in '05.
Quote:
The bottom line is electronics can be fickle and sometimes you get a bad unit and when that happens it can leave a bad taste in your mouth. That's usually when you will find people telling you to avoid the brand that they had trouble with. 


Personally I really like Marantz and Denon with the Audyssey room calibration. Onkyo also has the Audyssey system and like I said, my Onkyo worked fine but my friend's did not. Also I would not buy a stereo receiver because I have learned through time that if I limit myself today with something then I can almost guarantee you that tomorrow I will wish I hadn't. I would buy a 5.1 channel capable AVR simply because in a few years you may find yourself wishing you could use the receiver to set up a secondary HT or something (happened to me). But that's me, your milage may vary. 

This entire notion of "I'd rather recommend a 5.1+ surround AVR rather than a stereo model" has been argued countless times on infinite amounts of forums, normally revolving around the reasons you mentioned or the fact that they can be bass managed properly and room correction can be added, etc -- from my experience, if a person knows he or she is going to be dedicating a room or setup strictly to music listening, as it was in my case, it is always better to go with some kind of dedicated-to-stereo component like a receiver or integrated amp. There are less "video/surround" circuits to get in the way of more pure musical reproduction (I know you can always turn on a surround AVR's direct or pure mode, but there is still something more "humble" or "dedicated" about a STEREO component built to play out of two channels), there's a distinct lack of setup hassle (just plug in two speakers, some source components and maybe fiddle with the balance knob and that's it) and for those just wanting to play MUSIC, there's no worry of having to channel balance the five or more speakers etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by IntelliVolume  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24020120


This entire notion of "I'd rather recommend a 5.1+ surround AVR rather than a stereo model" has been argued countless times on infinite amounts of forums, normally revolving around the reasons you mentioned or the fact that they can be bass managed properly and room correction can be added, etc -- from my experience, if a person knows he or she is going to be dedicating a room or setup strictly to music listening, as it was in my case, it is always better to go with some kind of dedicated-to-stereo component like a receiver or integrated amp. There are less "video/surround" circuits to get in the way of more pure musical reproduction (I know you can always turn on a surround AVR's direct or pure mode, but there is still something more "humble" or "dedicated" about a STEREO component built to play out of two channels), there's a distinct lack of setup hassle (just plug in two speakers, some source components and maybe fiddle with the balance knob and that's it) and for those just wanting to play MUSIC, there's no worry of having to channel balance the five or more speakers etc.
 

I've read hundreds of posts about this. I was initially wanting to get a stereo receiver and then people gave me the advice above, and I thought it made sense. Now, if I had a perfect acoustically treated room, with high end components for the rest of my set up, may be a dedicated stereo amplifier would make a tiny difference. However, with everything else imperfect, I don't see how a stereo amplified vs an AVR will really change the sound quality. I might be wrong, but that is my newbie intuition. If I'm right, then it probably makes more sense for me to go 5.1 right now. My wife has mentioned getting a TV for the bedroom though that is not in the immediate future. So options like HDMI may be useful (which many stereo receivers don't seem to have). 
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VS85  /t/1502957/onkyo-tx-sr601-any-good#post_24020981

 

 

I've read hundreds of posts about this. I was initially wanting to get a stereo receiver and then people gave me the advice above, and I thought it made sense. Now, if I had a perfect acoustically treated room, with high end components for the rest of my set up, may be a dedicated stereo amplifier would make a tiny difference. However, with everything else imperfect, I don't see how a stereo amplified vs an AVR will really change the sound quality. I might be wrong, but that is my newbie intuition. If I'm right, then it probably makes more sense for me to go 5.1 right now. My wife has mentioned getting a TV for the bedroom though that is not in the immediate future. So options like HDMI may be useful (which many stereo receivers don't seem to have). 
That's my take as well. This goes back to evaluating the equipment you plan on hooking up to the receiver, the quality of the speakers, the room etc. Unless you have very good ears and your source material is of high quality (which means it was not downloaded off iTunes at a lower bit rate) and you plan on setting up the room to be an audiophile haven, then IMO I doubt you would notice the difference between how a stereo receiver and HT receiver played back your music. But as I said earlier, that's just me and how I see it. 
 
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