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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an outdoor antenna (RS), and RG6 cable with attached grounding wire (molded along side the RG6). Does anyone know if that ground is attached to the cable itself? I mean, does attaching that actually do anything (if it's not connected to the cable).


If it's not actually part of the cable, then is running a ground from the antenna to the outdoor electrical service ground all that is needed, or do I need to also ground the other end of the cable run?


My initial thought was to ground the cable wire (attached ground) on the outside to the electrical service ground, and the other end to the cold water pipe going out the basement. But then I started thinking, could this set up some kind of ground loop? Then I started thinking, is this RG6 ground wire even doing anything? Am I thinking too much? |-]


Thanks,

Shawn
 

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Connect one end to the antenna mast.

Connect the other end to the main electrical power ground.


Your coax should also have a grounding block installed outside. This should also be grounded to the main electrical power ground.
 

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Has anyone ever had a TV fried as the result of an ungrounded antenna?

Living in the NW, electrical storms are almost non-existant, but I personally don't know anyone who has had this occur. Having said that I DO practice safe viewing.

Tom
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by TAB
Has anyone ever had a TV fried as the result of an ungrounded antenna?

Living in the NW, electrical storms are almost non-existant, but I personally don't know anyone who has had this occur. Having said that I DO practice safe viewing.

Tom
Yes!!!!


It only takes one strike even in the NW. Lack of grounding also increases the odds that objects in the vicinity of the STB/TV such as stereos and people will be affected by the strike.


Ernie
 

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I have had both ungrounded and improperly grounded or bonded DirecTV STBs that died unexplainably. I have no proof that lack of proper ground caused these failures. But since grounding all antenna/dish/coax connections per NEC, I haven't had any fail.


Even if you don't have frequent lightning storms in your area, there are other reasons for grounding an antenna system.


One is static buildup. Wind blowing across the antenna can cause a static charge to build up on it. If ungrounded, these charges may discharge into your STB, TV, etc. and eventually fry them.


It's also against code to not properly ground an outdoor antenna.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
arxaw,

AFAIK, the cable comes in on the opposite side of the house, enters the basement, and is grounded to the cold water pipe.

This leads me back to one of my initial concerns, would having 2 separate grounds like this be a problem as far as introducing noise into the HDTV OTA signal?

If so, then I could either a) disconnect the cable ground from the cold water pipe. Or b) run that ground out to the main ground. Would connecting the cold water pipe to the main electrical ground be of any benefit? Would that equalize any differentials, or make them worse?


Thanks,


Shawn
 

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Ideally, it should be grounded to an acceptable ground point that's closest to the antenna/dish.


IF that source is not the main electrical power ground, it should be bonded to the main power ground. Not doing so may result in "ground loop" voltage differences between the two grounds. This can damage your STB, TV, etc.


If you have landline phone and cable TV or cable modem, those lines should also be grounded and bonded to the main power ground, if a separate ground is used for those. Your telco & cable companies are responsible for those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks arxaw,

One point of clarification, by bonded, do you mean "tied in to" / "connected to"?

If I ran a ground from the cold water pipe to the main electrical ground, would that be the same as bonding the cable line (currently on the water pipe) to the main power ground (which the antenna is close to and will be grounded to).

I know the water pipe is not the ideal ground, but it's essentially a metal pipe stuck in the dirt, like the main electrical ground, it's just located at a different spot of the house.


Thanks,


Shawn
 

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It's always best to ground everything to a single point even if it's inconvenient. When lightning strikes anywhere around, current travels radially outward from the strike point until attenuated away. When it flows under your house through the ground, don't give it a low-resistance path through anything in the house by having two metallic grounds.


Grounding techniques and the geometry of the ground points are actually explained quite well by freshman Physics. A lot of people study Physics but most don't ever use the acquired knowledge.


Gary
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by NogodZ
... If I ran a ground from the cold water pipe to the main electrical ground, would that be the same as bonding the cable line (currently on the water pipe) to the main power ground...
Yes.
 
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