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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is my question, I know that you can take a satellite signal plus a OTA antenna signal and mix them via a di-plexer or whatever it is called, send the combined signal down one cable, and then it splits out back to two cables, one for sat & one for OTA via a di-plexer (or whatever).



My issue is this, with my little silver sensor antenna I can receive all of the major networks in ATL except NBC. If I turn the antenna 180 degrees, I can then receive NBC, but lose about 3 others. I wanted to know if I purchase another silver sensor and have them back to back (kinda) and run both cables into one of the di-plexer things, but don't split it back out and just run it straight into my HDTV reciever, will that work???? Hope this makes sense.
 

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A diplexer is used to combine or separate a satellite signal and an over-the-air antenna or cable signal. If you want to take the outputs of two antennas, you'd use a combiner (often just any regular splitter used in reverse works, though there are devices specifically intended to combine that might just offer a lower insertion loss). So you'd combine the two antennas, connect the combiner output to the diplexer and then use a diplexer to split the antenna signal and the satellite signal at the receiver.


What you're planning to do, though, probably won't give you the results you expect. Combining two antennas often has other effects on the signal. But if you do this, at least ensure you use the same exact length of coax between the two antennas and the combiner. It's possible you'll get the results you want; it's also possible you won't. There's a myriad of threads around here (but most are in the Local HDTV Info and Reception forum) that discuss issues combining two antennas.
 

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Another option for using two antennas is a good old fashion A/B switch. That way uou don't have to worry about interference between the two antennas. You may even be able to get a remote controlled A/B switch.
 

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An RF splitter/combiner with two antennas might cause multipath problems because each antenna may recieve a different signal delay and you will be combining the two signals out of phase from each other. The A/B switch is better for this purpose as suggested.
 

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Since WXIA-DT is a VHF station, get a VHF-ONLY antenna and point it in the direction of WXIA-DT. Connect the 2 antennas with a VHF/UHF combiner and you should be good to go.


If the signal is strong and you want an indoor VHF-only antenna, go to Homey Despot and get an RCA cheapie rabbit ear antenna ($4.95 + tax). Remove the UHF loop, extend the dipoles ~28" or so and point perpendicular to WXIA-DT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by arxaw
Since WXIA-DT is a VHF station, get a VHF-ONLY antenna and point it in the direction of WXIA-DT. Connect the 2 antennas with a VHF/UHF combiner and you should be good to go.


If the signal is strong and you want an indoor VHF-only antenna, go to Homey Despot and get an RCA cheapie rabbit ear antenna ($4.95 + tax). Remove the UHF loop, extend the dipoles ~28" or so and point perpendicular to WXIA-DT.


Where did you see that NBC WXIA-DT in ATL is on VHF? Where can I find out what bands each station is on?
 

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Using one of those FM dipole antenna wire things will work for picking up the one VHF station. We have same problem in San Francisco Area, the NBC station broadcasts digital on VHF Ch 12, and all the others are UHF. Radio Shack Double Bow-Tie and FM dipole connected to the same antenna lead with no other hardware gets all the stations.
 
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