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How much of a factor is bad weather in ota digital reception?

Last week, we had a pretty nasty storm in nyc... during the storm (rain, wind, fog), I couldn't lock into abc-dt (nypdblue) for more than a couple of seconds.

Last night, with no weather problems, I watched the entire academy awards with virtually no disruptions.

Is this par for the course?
 

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Yep it is. While I never have lost reception here in the Bay Area due to the rain we get during the winter months, in spring summer and fall when we get an off shore flow and the temps rise under high pressure, the signals on the DTC-100 will drop 15 to 25 points, till the sun goes down. It is usually late afternoon when the temps are at the highest.

-rick
 

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Long-haul reception of VHF and UHF signals can be affected by a variety of weather factors. Rain and snow can create a "scatter" effect, if the rain is dense enough. This is rare, but it results in multipath from signal reflection and refraction.


The conditions described in the SF Bay area can be a result of tropospheric ducting. Cold air can form upper and lower troposphere boundaries around a warm air layer, much like a heating/cooling duct. Radio signals eneing this duct can be carried many miles away from their normal propagation areas.


Of course, other signals can come in on ducts and create interference to local channels. This phenomenon usually occurs at higher altitudes, though.


The 8VSB standard does not allow for a lot of multipath errors. Heavy fog, snow, rain, and other conditions may introduce just enough multipath problems to freeze up a set-top box.


It would be insightful to watch what happens to UHF analog TV signals when you observe this phenomena on UHF DTV signals!


KC
 
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