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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a guy come out today to install a tv antenna. I wanted the wiring to follow existing coax wiring for my cable modem into my media closet. He had no idea how someone was able to pull the wiring through the walls into the media closet (like my former installer did - who is no longer in business :cry:) In the media closet is a Tivo Roamio I'm currently using with cable, and want to use only with antenna.

One option would be to move my cable modem to the point where the cable enters the house, and repurpose my coax line to the media closet for the antenna.

The issue is everything is in the media closet, and I need direct ethernet connections for them (so need a router in the media closet).

I've been reading a bit about Moca, but am very confused. Is there a solution where I could have the cable modem in one room, and then run the antenna and internet (from the moca adapter) on the same coax to the media closet? Then can I use another moca adapter to connect to my router in the media closet? And I think I also need a splitter in the media closet, one end going into the Tivo, the other into the moca adapter?

I used Moca many years ago with another Tivo, and don't remember being this complicated. Any help or other ideas is appreciated.

Thanks
 

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I've been reading a bit about Moca, but am very confused. Is there a solution where I could have the cable modem in one room, and then run the antenna and internet (from the moca adapter) on the same coax to the media closet?

I used Moca many years ago with another Tivo, and don't remember being this complicated. Any help or other ideas is appreciated.
Hello, bellbm

Nobody has answered you yet, so I'll try with what little I know.

Over 6 years ago I helped mulliganman with an antenna problem and he was using a TiVo and MOCA for distriubution. I know more about antennas than about MOCA, but he posted a diagram that you might find interesting.

mulliganman's Tivo Diag.png


This was his long thread:
question regarding overamplification - TV Fool

He posted the diagram as an attachment to post #7 and I repeated it in post #61 on page 4.
 

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What seems missing from the Mulliganman diagram is the modem's ISP connection (and the modem's connection to the router).
 

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who is no longer in business :cry:
Chuckle. (Re; the reaction, not the fact.)

I used Moca many years ago with another Tivo, and don't remember being this complicated. Any help or other ideas is appreciated.
Well, the complication springs not so much from MoCA but from having just a single coax line to a location where you need both OTA and cable signals.

One option would be to move my cable modem to the point where the cable enters the house, and repurpose my coax line to the media closet for the antenna.
Separate from your immediate concerns (i.e. moving the modem to the point-of-entry and isolating the cable signals from the OTA antenna signals, and, necessarily, from the MoCA signals)... though not required at the advent of MoCA, isolating the cable Internet signals from MoCA would also be beneficial for future-proofing your setup, to isolate the DOCSIS 3.1 and later signals from MoCA, given the DOCSIS and MoCA specs have overlapping frequency ranges starting with DOCSIS 3.1. (info)


But a question... What WAN throughput (between modem and router) do you need supported? (Wanting to determine if the 100-150 Mbps of MoCA 1.1 would suffice, or if you'd need to bump-up to MoCA 2.x.)
 

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Is there a solution where I could have the cable modem in one room, and then run the antenna and internet (from the moca adapter) on the same coax to the media closet? Then can I use another moca adapter to connect to my router in the media closet?
Limited to a single coax line to the media closet, you have 2 main options that I can think of...
  1. move just the modem to the cable point-of-entry, and run OTA + MoCA WAN over the coax to the media closet;
  2. move the modem and router to the cable point-of-entry, and run OTA + MoCA LAN over the coax to the media closet, using a GigE switch and/or wireless access point in the media closet to network LAN devices;
Option 1 could work just as you've described, similar to a FiOS fiber setup, with a MoCA adapter connected to the modem's Ethernet WAN port and another MoCA adapter connecting to the router's Ethernet WAN port. The caveat to doing so with retail MoCA adapters is that it would prohibit or complicate operating a MoCA LAN.

Option 2 would similarly require 2 MoCA adapters, but one adapter would now be connected to a LAN port on the router, and the other to a Gigabit switch (w/ optional wireless access point or mesh node built-in or attached) in the media closet.

If you have zero need for a MoCA LAN, either solution will work.
 

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Option 1 could work just as you've described, similar to a FiOS fiber setup, with a MoCA adapter connected to the modem's Ethernet WAN port and another MoCA adapter connecting to the router's Ethernet WAN port. ...
As simple examples, merging the OTA & MoCA signals using the built-in diplexers of a pair of MoCA adapters, or using a pair of antenna/satellite diplexers (e.g.)...

w diplexers.png w built-in diplexers.png
- - - - -
edit: p.s. Should you revert to cable for TV, the built-in diplexer approach should still work, depending on the specs of the MoCA adapters chosen, but, given their specs, standalone diplexers would potentially cut off some portion of the cable TV signals, depending on the frequencies used by the provider.

w built-in diplexers - reverted to catv.png
 

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Option 2 would similarly require 2 MoCA adapters, but one adapter would now be connected to a LAN port on the router, and the other to a Gigabit switch (w/ optional wireless access point or mesh node built-in or attached) in the media closet.
Examples for Option 2, moving both the modem and router ... which has the benefit of affording the MoCA LAN full access to the entire MoCA Extended Band D frequency range, and so maximum throughput for whatever MoCA spec you choose. (Up to 2000 Mbps shared bandwidth in a 3+ node MoCA 2.5 setup, 2500 Mbps in a 2-node-only setup.) The primary benefit of Option 2 (also moving the router), though, comes if you need/want to expand wired networking via MoCA beyond the two locations.

MoCA LAN w built-in diplexers.png MoCA LAN expanded.png
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you. I was going to use option 1, with moca 2.0. But then realized I had another coax jack not being used in another room. And decided to run the antenna into that. This room has a rug I can run the coax along the edge (against the wall) and get it into my media closet. Cheaper and easier solution. As long I don’t ever need to move the rug!
 
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