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Discussion Starter #1
My contractor recently installed a panel for cat5 and coax connections in my office closet and I noticed there is an outlet within the panel itself. There is also an outlet a couple of feet below the panel which I requested. He stated that there is room to put a DSL modem in the panel itself, but I am unaware of a small UPS which can fit in there. What do people normally do in this situation? I plan on having the router and switch sitting on a bench right below connected to the outlet outside the panel. Of course I'll have to leave the panel open, but if I could fit something in that panel it would be nice. Thanks for any info.


I also noticed none of the cables are labeled, should the contractor label the cables normally? Thanks.

 

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In my opinion, a pro would always label everything. That being said, I can't count how many times I've walked in to a job where a contractor has not labeled anything.


I would definitely ask for them to be labeled - it will save you tons of grief and aggravation down the road.
 

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1) He should label, although you should be able to figure it out relatively quickly if he refuses.


2) As for a UPS, why would you bother for a DSL router? If your power goes out, you're not going to be computing for long anyway and you don't need the dsl router to shut down or save information. Arguably your switch and internal network router could go on a UPS especially if you use your network for file sharing, but even that seems like only someone in a mission critical kind of environment would really need it.


FWIW, for surge suppression I love my APC P1T . That should fit in that outlet and help suppress surges.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdrew /forum/post/14235282


2) As for a UPS, why would you bother for a DSL router? If your power goes out, you're not going to be computing for long anyway and you don't need the dsl router to shut down or save information.

Well, I'd like to still continue using the internet for short downtimes. I also imagine I might have to physically recycle the modem if it did go down, so a UPS seems like an important component for the DSL modem, in addition to the switch and router.


I guess I must be in the minority here but I'm going to use a UPS for it even though that means that outlet in the panel becomes absolutely useless. Thanks for your feedback.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug33 /forum/post/14235903


Well, I'd like to still continue using the internet for short downtimes. I also imagine I might have to physically recycle the modem if it did go down, so a UPS seems like an important component for the DSL modem, in addition to the switch and router.


I guess I must be in the minority here but I'm going to use a UPS for it even though that means that outlet in the panel becomes absolutely useless. Thanks for your feedback.

Surge suppression, for sure, but UPS on the router/modem/switch is a bit of overkill.


Even if you wanted to "continue to use the internet for short downtimes," a non-commercial (and thus, non-ginormous) UPS might give you what? 15 minutes of extra time? That's not going to keep you from having to power cycle your equipment (though such a need is _extremely_ unlikely).


My $.o2...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug33 /forum/post/14235903


Well, I'd like to still continue using the internet for short downtimes. I also imagine I might have to physically recycle the modem if it did go down, so a UPS seems like an important component for the DSL modem, in addition to the switch and router.

I turn my DSL modem off whenever I'm not using the computer. I just apply power and it boots up in less time than it takes to boot my computer. Don't see that you would have to physically recycle it if the power went off.


Do you have a lot of outages where you are?
 

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Quote:
I guess I must be in the minority here but I'm going to use a UPS for it even though that means that outlet in the panel becomes absolutely useless. Thanks for your feedback.

I'll back you on that. My automation system sends me notifications of things that might occur along with a power outage. That 15-30 mins of runtime a UPS will give my router & switches is well worth the low cost of a UPS to me.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stickyfingers /forum/post/14236216



Even if you wanted to "continue to use the internet for short downtimes," a non-commercial (and thus, non-ginormous) UPS might give you what? 15 minutes of extra time? That's not going to keep you from having to power cycle your equipment (though such a need is _extremely_ unlikely).


.

I suppose that with a battery-powered laptop even a small UPS could power a switch and router for a decent amount of time. The power draw on those is pretty low.


That said, if you want the UPS just plug it in below or hang it on the wall and use the in-box plug (I haven't seen any small enough to fit in there). You just won't be able to close the door. (Personally I wouldn't worry about having the box open--my entire rack of stuff is just hung on the wall.)
 

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My 0.2.

-If you decide to ditch the UPS some manufacturers make power strips that fit into there panels.

-If you must have 1 and want to mount it below the box on a shelf or something, you may want to try and make another knock out in the bottom of the box or something and run your cable from the ups through a split plate in the wall and up into your panel through the knock out you made. Just a suggestion. Atleast then you could close the door.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the suggestions everyone. Since I still need the router which won't fit anyway, and there is already an outlet a couple of feet below the panel, I'm just going to use a larger UPS and store everything on a shelf below, leaving the door open. Won't be a pretty site, but since it's a closet it doesn't really matter. Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_cable_guy /forum/post/14239925


My 0.2.

-If you decide to ditch the UPS some manufacturers make power strips that fit into there panels.

-If you must have 1 and want to mount it below the box on a shelf or something, you may want to try and make another knock out in the bottom of the box or something and run your cable from the ups through a split plate in the wall and up into your panel through the knock out you made. Just a suggestion. Atleast then you could close the door.

Keep in mind, running standard power cords behind dry wall is against code.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug33 /forum/post/14240145


Thanks for the suggestions everyone. Since I still need the router which won't fit anyway, and there is already an outlet a couple of feet below the panel, I'm just going to use a larger UPS and store everything on a shelf below, leaving the door open. Won't be a pretty site, but since it's a closet it doesn't really matter. Thanks.

For what it's worth, I also run all my network gear on a UPS. Actually it's a fairly sizeable UPS being it's a 900VA unit. Along with the ability to keep my network up and running for a decent time (if I shut off the other stuff that doesn't provide bare minimal internet connectivity) for a laptop to maintain net access, I like having stable power going to my network gear (and my servers) as I have a substantial investment in the gear.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WonHung /forum/post/14240785


Keep in mind, running standard power cords behind dry wall is against code.

True but it's not like he is an installer doing the work for someone else and has to worry about an inspection.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_cable_guy /forum/post/14246591


True but it's not like he is an installer doing the work for someone else and has to worry about an inspection.

And if both the plug and the equipment are exposed, it's pretty unlikely to be a hazard. Part of the code concern is having the plug/receptacle be inaccessible.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdrew /forum/post/14235282


2) As for a UPS, why would you bother for a DSL router? If your power goes out, you're not going to be computing for long anyway and you don't need the dsl router to shut down or save information. Arguably your switch and internal network router could go on a UPS especially if you use your network for file sharing, but even that seems like only someone in a mission critical kind of environment would really need it.

I have my DSL modem and wireless router on a small UPS. These small devices draw a fraction of the power of, say, a PC (I am thinking 10 watts or so). So I figure it will keep my net connection alive for a long time without power.. That would allow me to continue to use my laptop until ITS battery died.


Plus, I get frequent power "blinks" in my area and I prefer to not have the router and modem reboot and get re-sync'd every time.


Oh, I also have my cordless phones' base station plugged into it so all 4 cordless phones in the house continue to function in a power outage.
 

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I also use a UPS for my DSL modem and router. I figure it can't hurt and there have been several times when the power went out and I was able to go online and check weather radar, etc to see what was going on.


Also, I have a powered satellite multiswitch and it is in teh can and hooked to the switch so for a short outage, I do not get screwed up DVR recordings. This is mostly for blips or very brief outages. The UPSs that the DVRs are on will not last more than say 30 minutes anyway.
 
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