AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,883 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read that the new T2 will require a 3.06Ghz processor to playback the HD version...

The cost of a 3.06G processor is 380$ (pricewatch)

The cost of a 2.53G processor is 178$.

I have read you can overclock a 2.53Ghz processor using 1066MHz RDRAM to 2.73GHz (ABIT TH7II-RAID was used in: this article ).

My question is really just HTPC related:

- have you noticed any damage to the video performance by overclocking?

- is this going to be enough to play the T2 or other wmp9 HD files while we wait for HD hardware acceleration video cards?

- how noisy is it when you overclock it? I am planning to use a Zalman 7000AlCu to keep that baby cool... so there it goes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by gnollo
- how noisy is it when you overclock it? I am planning to use a Zalman 7000AlCu to keep that baby cool...
I have ordered the 7000Cu for my P4 2.53, so I should be able to give you a few pointers on this sometime next week. I know that the 7000 comes with a fanmate and you can change the speed to as low as 1350RPM while it produces 20dB worth of noise. I'm hoping this will be enough for the default clocked P4 2.53.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
gnollo,

Amirm has stated on the T2 thread that one will need a 2.6 ghz not a 3ghz+. So there should be no problem getting the 2.53ghz chip and probably running it at stock. Any slight overclocking that you might do would not make you need a faster or louder cooling solution.


hgodwin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,040 Posts
Hi,


Get a P4 2.4G and up the bus clock from 133 to 166. The CPU will be at 3G and the CPU bus will be at 666M which is the next best thing than the current 800M setup. Btw, with good quality DDR333 ram, everything is in-sync, for CHEAP!


It works on my Asus P4PE. Stock CPU fan/heatsink. All BIOS setting at default besides the CPU overclock.


regards,


Li On


PS: my dream setup is a 2.66G overclock to 3.3G (133->166 bus overclock), though I doubt if such extreme overclock works without heavy cooling...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,088 Posts
I've had a P4 1.8 at 2.4 since day 1, never a CPU issue.


Running the 1.8 at 2.4 takes the FSB from 100 to 133.

Since 133 is a standard, everything else is at spec speeds.


With my MB, I can run it higher, tried up to 140FSB but then the PCI and AGP is out of spec. I decided that was not worth it.


I think some MBs allow you to run the FSB over 133 and lock the PCI And AGP at 33/66.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,883 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
LiOn, how can the FSB be at 166.and the PCI and AGP bus be in spec?

Or you meant that it hasn't affected the overall perceived stability of your HTPC (you can see from my question that I am not a seasoned overclocker ;))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,040 Posts
Hi gnollo,


The PCI/AGP is in spec. The motherboard locks PCI/AGP clock independent of CPU/memory clock. I guess most recent motherboard has this feature.


regards,


Li On
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
Quote:
It works on my Asus P4PE. Stock CPU fan/heatsink. All BIOS setting at default besides the CPU overclock.
I have my Asus p4pe 2ghz p4 clocked to 2.8ghz. No issues what so ever. I do notice that the cpu and board run a few degress higher but it is not a problem at all.

FREAK!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,883 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow... so really now that the PCI/AGP clocks are independent of CPU/memory clock the only downside to overclocking is that it shortens the life spans of CPU and mboard... and WHO CARES, as I have been upgrading every 3 or so years my CPU?

This is great news... I missed that bit of news, I must say that it was the one thing that always made me hold back from overclocking....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by gnollo
... the only downside to overclocking is that it shortens the life spans of CPU and mboard...



Good, another one falls into the manufacturer supported/created thought that overclocking is bad for the components. Just buy the more expensive faster CPU...


Or, follow anectdotal evidence that current overclocking that doesn't involve increasing voltage to the Vcore, and runs at specified speed points, i.e. PCI 33MHz, AGP 66/133MHz, memory 133/166/200MHz is an inexpensive way to get the performance out of a "slower" system by leveraging the fact that one CPU line creates all different speeds, and they get stamped based on speed needs in the sales channel, and rarely based on a a maximum clock rating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I dont think that only the Clock is the reason. On the INTEL Site you can see that the 3GHz P4 uses Hypertreading which brings more performance boost than the clock increase. (compare with 2,53 and 2,8 GHz


Digital Video Performance Results

Pentium® 4 processor XMPEG* 4.5 with DivX* 5.02

(Frames per second)

2A GHz 53.8

2.53 GHz 67.9

2.80 GHz 73.7

3.06 GHz 101

3 GHz 110


So, Idont think that you really save something with buying a P4 2,53 GHz and overclock it!


Thomas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by tkukl
I dont think that only the Clock is the reason. On the INTEL Site you can see that the 3GHz P4 uses Hypertreading which brings more performance boost than the clock increase. (compare with 2,53 and 2,8 GHz


Digital Video Performance Results

Pentium® 4 processor XMPEG* 4.5 with DivX* 5.02

(Frames per second)

2A GHz 53.8

2.53 GHz 67.9

2.80 GHz 73.7

3.06 GHz 101

3 GHz 110


So, Idont think that you really save something with buying a P4 2,53 GHz and overclock it!


Thomas
CNet with partial quote below...


"... But does it work?

OK, but does Hyper-Threading actually work? After spending way too many hours in CNET Labs these last few weeks with a Hyper-Threading-enabled system, a myriad of test scripts, a stopwatch in each hand (one of the stopwatches was unceremoniously sacrificed in a moment of benchmarking frustration), and a dwindling prescription for Zoloft, I can report that Hyper-Threading works--but only with the right combination of applications. Just because a system supports Hyper-Threading doesn't necessarily mean that you will automatically see performance gains.



Just because a system supports Hyper-Threading doesn't necessarily mean that you will automatically see performance gains.


Hyper-Threading boosts the performance of applications that are either multithreaded or multitasking. Very few of today's mainstream apps are multithreaded, so the best chance you have of seeing performance benefits from a Hyper-Threading-enabled system is with multitasking applications. And by multitasking, I don't mean surfing the Web while your e-mail program checks for new messages every 15 minutes. I mean playing a hard-core 3D game while you're ripping music from a CD or capturing a fresh stream of video from your DV camcorder while also encoding a timeline at a high data rate from the movie you just edited.


If our tests showed anything, it's that you can't predict which combination of applications will offer significant performance boosts. We even discovered a couple of circumstances where a few applications actually performed slower under Hyper-Threading. News.com recently reported that several manufacturers, such as Dell and HP, have been shipping their Xeon-based workstations with Hyper-Threading disabled because there aren't enough applications on the market to take advantage of the technology. This makes industry wonks wonder if system vendors will ship their 3GHz P4 desktops to customers with Hyper-Threading disabled as well. (Editor's note: Dell has just announced that customers can specify if they want HT turned off or on at time of purchase. Users can also turn it on or off in the BIOS setup of the PC.) ..."
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top