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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What would be the recommended paint for active 3D? Any cheap and easy solution, or will a mix be necessary?


I'm currently projecting on a grey wall with dents in it which I think looks great for 2D, but I almost only use my PJ (w1080st) for 3D and for that it's just too dark and I'd hope to fix that without wrecking the black level too much.


I've tried it on an Elite pulldown screen before, so I already know how much more vibrant it can look on a brighter surface, but I still want to use the wall.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Fix those dents, prime the wall, and apply RS-MaxxMudd LL via spraying...or roller is your technique is good.


You will keep the contrast that the Gray wall provides, while acquiring the gain a bright white surface brings to and is needed for 3D.


RS-MaxxMudd LL is no cheapo paint...but it's not really all that expensive and basically very easy to mix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice. It all adds up to being a bit pricier than I would prefer but I'll consider the option. I'm pretty sure I'm going to want to stick with a roller method here, is that tougher to accomplish with this mix than with other paints? I'd also be concerned about hotspotting, is that something that gets worse as you get closer to the screen? Because I sit WAY closer than recommended.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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RS-MaxxMudd LL is the one advanced, higher gain / high contrast that can suffer to be rolled. I won't hot spot if rolled correctly, or develop roller marks, but therein lies the uncertainty in rolling any paint. Certainly a Flat White appears to be easy to roll....but as soon as a color is introduced, especially a darker, high contrast one, it becomes harder.


For a effective solution that would work for you, you need a slightly darker than white color that has a bit more gain than 1.0 . So application is everything. Many nail it first time out....some others not so much.


Using the correct Roller pressure....proper Paint loading....always working a wet edge....minimizing back-rolling and excessive "working" of the applied paint...avoiding texture issues.....added all together and basically it's a testimonial to how much easier and assured of success spraying can be.


Finally, when one wants a sizable screen that produces result on par or better than very expensive Mfg High Contrast / High Gain Screens, the expense of spraying (...avg $200.00 incl paint...) is not just reasonable, it's a no brainer. Uncertainty, or even fear retards the ambition of some, but of course that's why some of use are here...to offer encouragement, support, and to continually show the worthiness of ":going there ".


Whichever route is taken, using a slow, cautious approach is always best, and canvassing for help even mo'bedder.


Hot Spotting....that's when a smaller, defined area shows excessive sheen. Focused light returning directly to the eye, often in line with the angle of viewing as relates to the PJ's lamp.


Warm Spotting is a misnomer, because it really defines a much larger surface area that is overall a bit to "******" resulting is a larger centralized area that is obviously brighter toward the center than at the edges.


RS-MM-LL is formulated to prevent both circumstances from manifesting themselves. Rolling can work against that premise if excessive pressure overly flattens out the paint and arranges what metallic particles that are at the surface into a predominantly "Flat" orientation to the PJ's lens. Turning them into little "mirrors" if you will.


As stated above, rolling must be done correctly...almost to perfection to avoid the above listed caveats. But it seems the only real consideration most give Rolling is it's supposedly less expensive. Spraying essentially excludes almost every detrimental aspect of application save the necessity of having to invest in the Spraying apparatus itself.
 
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