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I painted my grills for my in wall speakers but a lot of the holes are clogged now..


The paint is already dried is there anything I can do?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by precator /forum/post/14169301


There are well over 2k holes probably on each grill. I dont have that much time..

Order new ones and the next time use spay paint instead of a roller on the grills.


I would not advise using just any thinner, but check what's recommended for the paint you used - keep in mind, that the stronger stuff may also destroy the grills as well.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinipux77 /forum/post/14171333


Order new ones and the next time use spay paint instead of a roller on the grills.

That would be funny using a roller on speaker grills...I did that once on an old car of mine...


The key is either using spray paint and applying it very sparingly or using a barely damp paint brush. The paint won't close up holes after it's applied, so just keep an eye on it while you're working.


Jason
 

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You have access to air-compressor? That will blow them out. Everytime I have to paint inwall speakers I use an air-less or one of those spray kits that allow you to use your paint.
 

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If the grills are plastic solvents may destroy them. But then if he doesn't want to get the paintt out of them manually they are a loss anyway. Try using a stiff nylon brush with a very gentle solvent. Denatured alcohol would be my first choice, then move on to goof off or lacquer thinner.

Good luck
 

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I refer to this malady as..."The Krylon Nightmare!!"


]


The problem is, when you paint a metal grill, it has been painted once already, and you wind up making the holes or slits smaller. (ugly, and poorer sound.) It's nearly impossible to do a good job. Expanded metal grills (Triad) are even harder to paint. Because of this, we offer our grills primed but unpainted, or with any of our speakers, free color matching is included in the price. I have sat for three hours with a fnorkin' grill and a box of toothpicks, and it is maddening.


Some installers have had fair results by thinning the paint and brushing it, and immediately blowing it dry, or spraying with thinned paint. Still, you don't know what paint formulation was used originally, and if the new paint will stick. We use water-based paints, but almost everyone else uses solvent-based. It's a crap shoot.
 

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I've painted mine with success in the past. I've used latex paint and thinned it down a bit with Wagner's paint conditioner (available at Wal-Mart and Lowes). I then lightly brush the mixture of the thinned paint over the grills. I've achieved a good finish with two coats of paint doing it this way. The holes don't get clogged due to the thinner paint - and two coats seems about right for an even color, since the paint has been thinned.
 

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All of these suggestions, and no one has bothered to ask, "What kind of paint did you use; latex or enamel?". If it was latex, the answer is very easy, soak them in warm water until the paint softens then gently scrub them with an old toothbrush. If you used enamel and your grills are plastic, try using lacquer thinner. A word of caution though, put a little of the thinner on a Q-Tip and dab it on the backside of the grill first to see if the thinner will damage your grill. If it doesn't great, use rubber gloves and some old rags and clean away. If the thinner just messes up the surface of the grill, use it anyway because you're going to paint the grills, but be gentle and take your time. But, if the thinner softens or melts the plastic, just contact the speaker mfg and order new grills.


Good luck!
 
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