AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a smooth (two of them actually) MDF board from Home Depot, Behr primer, Behr eggshell white paint, and the thinnest nap roller I could find (3/16 nap).


The first board got one coat of primer and 2 coats of white paint. Texture showed up on the coat of primer. I was hoping the additional coats of paint would smooth it all out, but it didn't. I turned the smooth MDF board into a slightly textured board. Since I'm not a painter or the carpenter-type, I decided to try again and hopefully get it right.


I painted the second board with a liberal coat of primer, a different brand that I bought at the open all night Walmart down the road from me.


Texture from the roler did happen, but I was happy with the fact that there weren't streaks like there were the first time I did it.


After drying, I applied the Behr eggshell paint. I was very carefull but I still get texture.


Am I doing something wrong? Can you get a mirror smooth paint job with the roller I used? If you can, please give me some advice. I'm no handy-man, but I do learn pretty quickly.


Or is this a job for a paint gun? If it is, I'd have to rething the DIY route since I'd also have to buy a compressor as well. Now we're at about $300 and that's not including paint.


Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
It's probably easier to use a paint gun but the techinque I've heard works the best is using a thicker napped roller than normal, loading it completely with paint and make sure you prime really well and change directions of your rolling (diagonal, horizontal, vertical). If you are having trouble with lines at the rollers edge try using a paint additive like flowtroll which slows the drying time and gives you time to correct your mistakes. By far though the most important thing you can do is keep your roller fully loaded with paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My second attempt was far better than my first one, but there was no way I could avoid texture. I decided to do a fine sanding after the two coats dried, but that didn't do much. The texture is not coming out unless I sand every layer of paint out.


I'll do one more layer of paint and see how it works, then I'll see if I can find that Plastex stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
You may also want to consider putting on like 2 or 3 coats of primer, then lightly sanding it with a fine grit sandpaper to smooth it out...VERY FINE SANDPAPER so you don't get scratch lines from the sanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On my second board, I used almost the full quart of primer on the 8 x 4 (actually it was less than 4 feet tall), which was way more than I needed according to the directions. It looked pretty good but was still textured. At least you couldn't see streaking like you could on my first one.


How the heck does one get these painted perfectly flat like the board comes? Maybe you squeegee it or something.


Do commercial screens have any visible weave texture to them at all? The only experience I have is with movie theater screens and they have tiny pinholes but look perfectly flat to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
You may want to try a latex paint additive called "Floetrol" available at Home Depot, Lowes, or your local paint shop. It is used to primarily to allow you to spray latex, but has the added benefit of levelling brush/roller marks (according to the product literature). At the end of the day, I think the bottom line is you won't be able to get a perfectly smooth surface without spraying and practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,769 Posts
Why are you against texture?


a little texture will likely help the picture more than hurt it. A perfectly smooth board will likely hotspot.


If you want perfectly smooth just use a rattle can of flat white spray paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The texture will help?


The screen we put up to test the projector (Electrohome 8500 CRT) was a primered artist canvass that was recommended to me by Tim, a fellow member of this forum.


It actually worked pretty well, but it was just a quick solution. When you get close to the screen, you see the weave of the material. I felt that this hampered the picture quality. It almost looked like it caused a screen door effect.


Now my painted board looks somewhat like the painted drywall of my house, though not as textured as that. I was hoping for an extremely flat surface with a white semigloss or matte finish with a gain of about 1.0 or slightly greater. I can control the light in my room and I only sit about 10 feet from the screen so I don't feel I need more gain than that.


How will the texture give a better picture than smooth and flat, assuming no hot spotting, which I don't have at the moment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,769 Posts
texture may reduce hotspotting and aid in diffusion of the light.


why do you care if you can see the texture from a few feet? Do you view movies from this location?


I would stop making assumptions. Do whatever gives you the best picture from your normal viewing positions. If texture looks good, then texture is good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
My DIY screen is painted MDF that I look from 11' away. Yes, there is texture, which is visible from 7' or so. It is absolutely not an issue. Put your screen up and enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
FWIW, I've had great results recently on MDF just skipping the primer and going with 2 coats of Behr Ultra White Flat, put on with a 3/16" roller. This gave me a really smooth surface.


Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Have you tried a paint additive called Flowtrol? It will greatly reduce texture as it slows down the drying process and allows the paint to flow better. Search this site for the name.


W-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
If you're looking for perfectly smooth, you might try a coat of urathane on the MDF, then sand before you paint. The texture is probably from moisture absorption from the paint/primer. (Take a piece of scrap particle board or MDF and leave a wet rag on it for half an hour and see what happens). The trick is to waterproof it with something you can sand.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top