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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to make some DVD from my DirecTV DVR.. S-Video I guess..
Which is better?? And why?? Quality, ease of use and reliability..
I have an EZ485V but need another one.. I have some JVC Combo's
that are easy to use, the quality of the 485V seems to be better..
Thx. W.G.
Question: why is there not an Open/ Close button for the Disc Tray
on the 485V Remote or am I over looking it??
 

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S-video should provide better picture quality than composite, I use S-video whenever possible.
Panasonics have the advantage of full resolution recording through LP or 4hrs/SL DVD. Pretty much all other mfgs. cut resolution in half(half D-1) or worse on slower speeds. I like to use FR set to around 2.7 hrs/DVD for good resolution and also good bitrate. For anything I really care about I don't like to go over 3hrs/DVD although I also use LP for things I mainly record and delete or aren't so critical for picture quality, I never really go worse than LP.
Panasonic has never had a OPEN/CLOSE button on their DVDR remotes, well at least not in the last decade and a half. People that really like that feature purposely look for an older(pre '04 I believe) Panasonic remote which has that button. Panasonic DVDR remote codes are the same for all years, Panasonic DVD players have the eject on the remote but lack other recorder specific buttons like REC and others.
Honestly the EZS-48v is one of Panasonic's most quirky models, count yourself lucky if yours is working good, I tried several and returned them all within the return period a decade ago, I do have a couple EZ-28(VHSless) models that have been working good for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Addition

Is there an stand alone DVD Writer that would be better than these
Panasonics mentioned above that I could use??
Thx. W.G.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
S-video should provide better picture quality than composite, I use S-video whenever possible.
Panasonics have the advantage of full resolution recording through LP or 4hrs/SL DVD. Pretty much all other mfgs. cut resolution in half(half D-1) or worse on slower speeds. I like to use FR set to around 2.7 hrs/DVD for good resolution and also good bitrate. For anything I really care about I don't like to go over 3hrs/DVD although I also use LP for things I mainly record and delete or aren't so critical for picture quality, I never really go worse than LP.
Panasonic has never had a OPEN/CLOSE button on their DVDR remotes, well at least not in the last decade and a half. People that really like that feature purposely look for an older(pre '04 I believe) Panasonic remote which has that button. Panasonic DVDR remote codes are the same for all years, Panasonic DVD players have the eject on the remote but lack other recorder specific buttons like REC and others.
Honestly the EZS-48v is one of Panasonic's most quirky models, count yourself lucky if yours is working good, I tried several and returned them all within the return period a decade ago, I do have a couple EZ-28(VHSless) models that have been working good for me.
Hi Mr. Jeff,
Thx. 4 the reply..
I have an EZ-485V, but I have two (2) DVR's.. I would like to connect
an DVD Writer/ Recorder to my other DVR.. It does not have to the
2 Panasonic's that I mentioned above..
W.G.
 

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There is no difference whatsoever between the Panasonic DMR-EZ48v and DMR-485v: they are identical units. The 485 was packaged with a "free" HDMI cable included in the box, upon request from a few retail chains: thats the only reason for the two model numbers.

The 48v/485v, along with the other Panasonics jjeff mentioned, were the last new major-brand dvd recorders introduced in USA/Canada circa 2009. After that, the only new dvd recorders marketed were a single DVD/VHS combo and single DVD/HDD combo, re-packaged with new model numbers year after year by Funai under the Magnavox, Toshiba and Sanyo brand names. The quality control and build quality of the Funais declined over time, until they were finally discontinued in 2017.

No really decent DVD recorder was made after 2009: any Panasonic, Pioneer, JVC LG, or Toshiba you can find will be second-hand and at least nine years old. These units still have a cult following that drives prices to ridiculous heights: don't overpay. Given their age and tendency to break down, no used dvd recorder is truly worth more than $200 today (and thats pushing it). I wouldn't spend more than $100, because when they drop dead suddenly they are un-repairable now (unless you are willing to pay a private "guru" $200 to $300 for their expertise and rare stash of spare parts). If you MUST make backup recordings from your cable/satellite PVR, the only good option left is to use a PC. Thousands of small shoebox-sized PCs running Windows 7, with built-in dvd burners, are available second hand for under $100. Get one of those USB video input adapters, connect the PC to your decoder box, and you're all set: you can keep the recordings as MP4 files, or convert them to DVDs.

You might also reconsider whether it is really worth backing up your PVRs at all. Pretty much everything is available to stream on demand from NetFlix or Amazon nowadays: keeping a personal library has become redundant and passe. If you miss an episode or a movie, it is almost certainly available on demand from your cable/satellite system or streaming service. For better and worse, the era of "physical media" is over: devices like dvd recorders are long gone. Ten years from now, TV as we know it will likely be altogether gone, replaced by ever more streaming variants.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There is no difference whatsoever between the Panasonic DMR-EZ48v and DMR-485v: they are identical units. The 485 was packaged with a "free" HDMI cable included in the box, upon request from a few retail chains: thats the only reason for the two model numbers.

The 48v/485v, along with the other Panasonics jjeff mentioned, were the last new major-brand dvd recorders introduced in USA/Canada circa 2009. After that, the only new dvd recorders marketed were a single DVD/VHS combo and single DVD/HDD combo, re-packaged with new model numbers year after year by Funai under the Magnavox, Toshiba and Sanyo brand names. The quality control and build quality of the Funais declined over time, until they were finally discontinued in 2017.

No really decent DVD recorder was made after 2009: any Panasonic, Pioneer, JVC LG, or Toshiba you can find will be second-hand and at least nine years old. These units still have a cult following that drives prices to ridiculous heights: don't overpay. Given their age and tendency to break down, no used dvd recorder is truly worth more than $200 today (and thats pushing it). I wouldn't spend more than $100, because when they drop dead suddenly they are un-repairable now (unless you are willing to pay a private "guru" $200 to $300 for their expertise and rare stash of spare parts). If you MUST make backup recordings from your cable/satellite PVR, the only good option left is to use a PC. Thousands of small shoebox-sized PCs running Windows 7, with built-in dvd burners, are available second hand for under $100. Get one of those USB video input adapters, connect the PC to your decoder box, and you're all set: you can keep the recordings as MP4 files, or convert them to DVDs.

You might also reconsider whether it is really worth backing up your PVRs at all. Pretty much everything is available to stream on demand from NetFlix or Amazon nowadays: keeping a personal library has become redundant and passe. If you miss an episode or a movie, it is almost certainly available on demand from your cable/satellite system or streaming service. For better and worse, the era of "physical media" is over: devices like dvd recorders are long gone. Ten years from now, TV as we know it will likely be altogether gone, replaced by ever more streaming variants.
Thx. CitiBear for your reply,
I have always been a Day late and a Dollar short; sometimes I have to be
dragged kicking and screaming into the future (new technology)..
I do have a buddy who is an Certified TV/ VCR/ DVD Repairman..
I think I will try an EZ-28 unless someone tells me different..
 

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I have always been a Day late and a Dollar short; sometimes I have to be
dragged kicking and screaming into the future (new technology)..
You're not alone: I'm still holding onto several classic DVD/HDD recorders myself. Old habits die hard, but I use these units less and less after discovering the download "scene" and other options a few years ago. There's more than one path to a dvd backup: actually dubbing the material from my cable PVR (then tediously cutting out the commercials for archiving) isn't the thrill it used to be.

I do have a buddy who is an Certified TV/ VCR/ DVD Repairman..
It isn't so much having access to a repair tech: the big problem is unavailable or insanely expensive spare parts, primarily burners and their associated circuit boards. Panasonic did make the most durable recorder burners, but if/when they die it is impossible to source replacements now. For all practical purposes, most dvd recorders were disposable: the cost of replacing the burner was typically $250 or more, so most people simply bought a whole new recorder instead (at least until they were all discontinued).

I think I will try an EZ-28 unless someone tells me different..
The EZ-28 is a nice recorder but sorta rare. The most popular EZ series Panasonics (by far) were the DVD/VHS combos. By 2007, the dvd-only models were pretty much "special order" at most dealers, so they don't turn up as often for local sale (tho oddly, eBay seems cluttered with EZ-28s this week). As I suggested earlier, be careful not to overpay or be lured into eBay bidding wars: if you can snag one locally via Craigs List for under $100, fine, but as prices approach or surpass $200+ these second-hand machines are a risky investment.
 

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Its hard to translate the DVD knowledge, into BD knowledge (or) MPEG2 to H.264 and so on. DVD recorders were best for handling original broadcast recordings from the VHS / S-VHS or BetaMax era.. even original LaserDisc. PVR recordings are already digital and don't need the same care an original NTSC broadcast recording needs.

S-Video and Component are rare or rapidly disappearing inputs for any recorder, only a few Game recorders from Hauppauge or AverMedia have them, and their newer models do not. For that reason, sometimes an older DVD recorder is preferable.. for the Inputs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You're not alone: I'm still holding onto several classic DVD/HDD recorders myself. Old habits die hard, but I use these units less and less after discovering the download "scene" and other options a few years ago. There's more than one path to a dvd backup: actually dubbing the material from my cable PVR (then tediously cutting out the commercials for archiving) isn't the thrill it used to be.

It isn't so much having access to a repair tech: the big problem is unavailable or insanely expensive spare parts, primarily burners and their associated circuit boards. Panasonic did make the most durable recorder burners, but if/when they die it is impossible to source replacements now. For all practical purposes, most dvd recorders were disposable: the cost of replacing the burner was typically $250 or more, so most people simply bought a whole new recorder instead (at least until they were all discontinued).

The EZ-28 is a nice recorder but sorta rare. The most popular EZ series Panasonics (by far) were the DVD/VHS combos. By 2007, the dvd-only models were pretty much "special order" at most dealers, so they don't turn up as often for local sale (tho oddly, eBay seems cluttered with EZ-28s this week). As I suggested earlier, be careful not to overpay or be lured into eBay bidding wars: if you can snag one locally via Craigs List for under $100, fine, but as prices approach or surpass $200+ these second-hand machines are a risky investment.
Mrng.
I have bought an EZ 28 on ebay for $83.00 to go along with my EZ 485V..
I have 2 DVR's one which is mine that DirecTV let me keep because it was
not working properly.. I put in an new pipeline 1TB drive (old 1 was 500gb) after
a buddy of mine cloned the software from old 1 to the new 1.. Works good..
Thx. W.G.
 
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