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Discussion Starter #1
Since the owners thread is getting lengthy and in the interest in assisting newbies find the answers to some of the questions that they may have regarding the Panasonic plasma line, I am starting this thread.


I am by no means an expect, since I have only had my TH58PZ700U for two weeks, but welcome more experienced owners imput in helping answer the newer owners questions. If noone likes it, it can always be deleted.


1. What are the complete dimensions of my TV (including the stand and without it)?


Here are the approximate dimensions that you are looking for:

TH-42PZ700U

42.5" x 27.2" x 5.5" without stand

42.5" x 29.8" x 14.6" with stand (stand is 27.2" x 14.6")

TH-50PZ700uU750U

49.9" x 31.6" x 5.5" without stand

49.9" x 33.5" x 14.6" with stand (stand is 28.8" x 14.6")

TH-58PZ700uU750U

57.3" x 36.2" x 5.7" without stand

42.5" x 38.2" x 16.5" with stand (stand is 35.4" x 16.5")

2. Do I have to use a Panasonic wall bracket, or can I use other 3rd party wall mounts?


We (Panasonic) recommend you use the optional mounting brackets manufactured by Panasonic. However, if you choose to use another brand of wall bracket, please be sure it will accommodate the position of the mounting bolt holes on the Panasonic Plasma TV (660mm x 320mm for models up to 58", 1075.2mm x 330mm for 65" models), the thread of the screws (M8 type), and support the weight of the display (consult the Operating Instruction manual for your model).

3. Can I mount the TV over my fireplace?


As long as the plasma TV will not be exposed to smoke or excessive heat, it should be fine. First, take a thermometer and tape it to the area directly above your fireplace -- where the plasma will be. Then build a nice fire and monitor the thermometer for the next hour or so. If the temperature is above 104 degrees F, then the area is too hot for your plasma to be operating. Of course, you could choose to keep your plasma turned off while a fire is burning. In the end, please use common sense. If the area above your fireplace is too warm or exposed to smoke, you probably want to put your plasma TV somewhere else.

4. What is the "break-in" period and what should I do during the break-in period to minimize any risk of image retention?


When your plasma TV is initially installed, the first 100 hours of use is known as the "break-in period." During this time, to minimize any risk of image retention, you should:
  • Make sure the plasma TV is in a viewing mode (aspect ratio) that completely fills the screen. The panel is shipped in this condition, in what is called the "Just" mode.
  • Turn down the Picture setting (in the Picture menu) to +0.
  • Briefly engage the 4:3 mode and confirm the side bars are set to "Mid", or "Bright". This can be adjusted in the Set Up menu.
  • Always return the display mode that fills the screen (such as Just, Zoom, Full, or H-FILL).
  • Try not to view channels with stationary backgrounds or logos for extended periods of time.
  • Avoid extended display of static images (video games, computer images, DVD title screens, etc.).

5. I've heard that plasma TVs can "burn-in" over time. What is "burn-in" exactly, and is it really a concern?

"Burn-in," or image retention, is an uneven aging of the phosphors in a display device, can occur on any display that uses phosphors to generate an image, including tube TVs, projection TVs that use CRTs, and plasma TVs. Such uneven aging happens when bright, static images are left onscreen for an extended period of time, which can leave a visible "shadow" effect.


Improvements in panel service life to the new 1/2 life of 100,000 hours (or about 40 years at 7 hours/day) have minimized the risk of image retention. In addition, screen savers, pixel shifting, and brightness level adjustments can dramatically reduce any chance of image retention. Use common sense when it comes to your plasma TV; don't pause video games or watch TV stations with station logos onscreen for long periods of time, and use one of the many display calibration DVDs available today for properly setting brightness and contrast.


The rule of thumb: if you don't worry about your traditional tube TV, you don't have to worry about a Panasonic plasma TV.

6. How long can I expect my plasma TV to last?


All displays (TVs, computer monitors, LCD, plasma) lose brightness over time. Believe it or not, that old tube TV you have in the den isn't as bright as it was when you bought it 10 years ago. And displays dim faster if you set the brightness and contrast very high.


Panasonic plasma TVs have a projected life of 60,000 hours before they're only half as bright as when they were new. That's 20+ years at 7 hours a day (which is the average daily viewing time per U.S. household).

7. I need help to get the best picture. Which connection should I use? Panasonic plasma TVs allow a wide selection of video inputs to achieve the best picture quality possible from your video source.[/b]


The best connection from your cable/satellite box, home theater system, or DVD player is HDMI (flat multi-pin connector). If your video source doesn't have HDMI, the next best choice is component (color-coded red, green, and blue jacks), followed by S-Video (round 4-pin jack), then composite (yellow jack).


8. Why does my picture look different than it did in the retail store?


Many retailers use high-definition signals that are designed to optimize the capabilities of the displays. And to get the best picture, you'll want to take advantage of stunning HD programming, as well. So, be sure to upgrade to HD programming. Here's how:


If you're like most people, and already have cable or satellite TV, the easiest thing to do is call your cable or satellite company. They'll hook you up with everything you need to get eye-popping HD programming.


Most Panasonic plasma TVs also have built-in HDTV tuners. So, if you live close to a TV station broadcasting HDTV, you might be able to receive free over-the-air HDTV broadcasts with an antenna.


In order to help you get the best possible picture quality, you also need to make sure all of the components are connected properly. Take a look at our HD Programming set up guide. (Attached)

9. What is HDMI? Is it compatible with DVI?

HDMI, which stands for "High-Definition Multimedia Interface", is the consumer electronic industry's first connection capable of transmitting uncompressed digital audio/video signals. Components featuring HDMI can transmit both digital audio and video over one convenient cable, replacing the tangled mess that resides behind many home theater components. HDMI also offers improved quality over traditional analog connections thanks to all-digital transmission. Digital sources like DVDs and HDTV programming can now be transferred digitally from source to display without analog conversions that can degrade the original signal.


Unlike the HDMI interface, DVI only handles digital video. Through the use of an adapter, a DVI device can be connected to an HDMI device, but only video content can be transmitted. The audio signal would have to be transmitted through other methods such as analog RCA outputs or an optical digital output.

10. I need help with HDMI setup procedures for best picture.


Please connect HDMI cable and set up the "HDMI In" in the "Audio" MENU as follows. (See first attachment)


Select "Audio" after pressing the "MENU" button.
(See audio setup 1 attachment)


Select "Other Adjust" in the "Audio" MENU.
(See audio setup 2 attachment)


Select "Auto" in the "HDMI In" MENU

Note* If connecting to an equipment that has only a DVI output terminal, connect HDMI-DVI Conversion Cable and an audio cable as shown in the drawing above. Selecting "Analog" in the "HDMI In" MENU may be necessary depending on the equipment you use.

11. I have noticed over-emphasized green tones in the picture. Can it be turned off?


Panasonic plasma TVs have a special circuitry called Color Management. This feature automatically enhances green and blue to achieve a more vivid color reproduction, especially for outdoor scenes. This feature is set On by default, however, it can easily be turned Off from the Picture menu.

12. Can I connect my PC to the TV?


Specific Panasonic plasma TV models (such as TH-42PZ700U, TH-50PZ700U/750U, and TH-58PZ700U/750U) have a dedicated PC input, so you can connect your PC directly to your plasma TV. Please be sure to refer to the Operating Instructions for your particular model to obtain specific details regarding the compatible input signal types. For further information or assistance, please call us at 1-888-843-9788.

13. What does the Aspect button control?


The Aspect button allows you to change the shape of the television image depending on the format of the received signal, and your viewing performance.


For example, standard analog (4:3) images with black side bars can be stretched to fill your TV's wide (16:9) aspect. However, high definition signals (720P/1080i) which originated as 4:3 images with side bars and are up-converted by broadcaster to 16:9 can not be changed on some models.


The models, including TH-42PZ700U, TH-50PZ700U/750U, and TH-58PZ700U/750U employ a new "H-FILL" mode which allows you to change the aspect on high definition signals (720P/1080i). (see aspect controls attachment)


14. For additional information not answered here, use the [Search this Thread] feature (located just under the page number listings in the upper right side of the screen) under Panasonic 42pz700, 50pz700u, 50pz750u, 58pz700u and 58pz750u Owners Thread! or all forums, and enter the appropriate key word(s) you want to search for. You must be logged on, in order to use this feature.


Well this is a start, and I welcome questions from newbies and imput from more experienced owners.


Thanks



 

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I'll sort of get this rolling with some links to other useful threads.

OWNER'S THREAD: Here's the link the the VERY well-developed (read: very long) "Owner's Thread" in which pretty much every concievable question you could have has been asked and answered no fewer than 74 times: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...43093&page=264

SETTINGS THREAD: Here's a link to give you an answer when you start playing with the TV's settings and begin to wonder to yourself, "I wonder what other people have this set at": http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=978568


Good luck and enjoy the set!


--Mav


P.S. Good idea DSSKid!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Viewing distance according to SMPTE (thanks to sauereald for the info)


"SMPTE (Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers) has a document entitled Recommended Practice 166 "Critical Viewing Conditions for Evaluation of Color Television Pictures" in which they provide their practice for evaluation of TVs. In summary - they state that the distance from the screen should be 4-6 picture heights, and the observer should view the monitor screen at a preferred angle in both the Horizontal and Vertical places of 0degrees - +/-5 degrees, but no greater than +/-15 degrees.


If you are really interested, you can purchase the SMPTE specs at their website - www.smpte.org. "
 

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Discussion Starter #4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverickster2 /forum/post/12916432


I'll sort of get this rolling with some links to other usefull threads.

OWNER'S THREAD: Here's the link the the VERY well-developed "Owner's Thread" in which pretty much every concievable question you could have has been asked and answered no fewer than 74 times: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...43093&page=264

SETTINGS THREAD: Here's a link to give you an answer when you start playing with the TV's settings and begin to wonder to yourself, "I wonder what other people have this set at": http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=978568


Good luck and enjoy the set!


--Mav

Thanks for your imput Mav.
 

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Thanks so much for this thread. It contained EVERYTHING I was looking for. I have already adjusted my settings for the break in period ( I had no idea). I can't wait to try all the various settings to see which one I like best.


Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The PZ700U accepts the 1080p/24 signal and converts it to 1080p/60
 

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Discussion Starter #7
From Maverickster2:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverickster2 /forum/post/12906530


Changes to Cinema, Standard, and Vivid are universal; changes to "Custom" are input-specific.


--Mav
 

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Discussion Starter #8
From Cnet:


cnet editors' rating 8.0 out of 10.0 Excellent


Reviewed by: David Katzmaier


Reviewed on 6/14/07 The Panasonic TH-42PZ700U is one of the most expensive 42-inch plasmas on the market, but it's also the best-performing flat panel of its size we've ever tested. The high price can be blamed squarely on its native resolution--it's the first and only 42-inch 1080p plasma--but the picture quality has little to do with all those pixels. Instead, we noted its deep black levels and realistic shadow detail along with a commendably clean image. Of course, we could complain about other aspects of its performance, namely its color accuracy, but that's not enough to spoil an excellent picture. If you have the cash to burn but don't have the space to go bigger, the Panasonic TH-42PZ700U fits the bill perfectly.

Design

Basic, glossy black defines the style of the Panasonic TH-42PX700U and its larger cousins in the TH-PZ700U series of 1080p plasmas. The 42-inch screen is surrounded by a rather thick black frame, with the top edge angled back slightly from the main front plane. Its sides are augmented by a pair of inch-wide speakers with tiny perforations for better blend-in, and its bottom edge is raked back to match the top. A central flip-up door hides inputs and controls, while a smaller door to the right conceals the memory card slot. Panasonic includes a matching pedestal stand.


Including the stand, the TH-42PX700U measures 42.5 inches wide by 29.8 inches high by 14.6 inches deep, and weighs 99 pounds. Remove the stand and it measures 42.5 inches wide by 27.2 inches high by 5.5 inches deep, and weighs 83.8 pounds.


We really liked Panasonic's remote. Its layout is basically the same as last year's model, but the somewhat larger buttons feel much better. Its keys--of which there are just the right number--are arranged quite logically, and although there's no backlighting, we appreciated the ease with which we were able to locate buttons by feel. The remote can control as many as three other devices. Panasonic's internal menu system is intuitive enough, although we disliked the ease with which you can inadvertently erase your picture settings.

Features

As we've mentioned, the Panasonic TH-42PZ700U's main claim to fame is its pixel count. It has a native resolution of 1,920x1,080 pixels (or, 1080p), the highest available today, and significantly higher than the 1,024x768 resolution commonly available at this screen size. As we found, however, you'll have to sit quite close to the screen to appreciate the benefits of 1080p (see below). All of those pixels allow it to resolve every detail of 1080i and 1080p sources, while all other sources, including 720p HDTV, DVD, and standard-definition television, are scaled to fit the pixels.


Otherwise, the TH-42PZ700U has the feature set of a perfectly normal flat-panel HDTV. It incorporates a good number of picture adjustments, although there is one missing piece--it lacks the ability to fine-tune color temperature beyond the three presets. We did appreciate that the three overall picture presets are adjustable, and there's a fourth adjustable mode labeled "Custom" that's independent per input.


There are a few advanced controls we mostly disabled for critical viewing. The color management control is said to enhance blue and green, but we found that color balance was more accurate when it was turned off. A setting labeled C.A.T.S. supposedly adjusts brightness to optimize contrast on the fly, so we left it off. There are three kinds of noise reduction settings--more on their effects below. In addition to a selector for 3:2 pulldown, you can choose between two HDMI black levels. Light was our preference, as Dark obscured details in shadows.


In addition to the five aspect ratio modes for HD sources, there are four for standard-def. Although the Panasonic lacks a specific mode designed to perfectly match incoming 1080-resolution signals to the 1080p panel with no overscan (a setting known as "dot-by-dot" on some HDTVs), you can achieve the same effect by selecting the Full mode and choosing Size 2 from the HD size selection of the Other adjust section of the Picture menu. We'd prefer the option to be easier to change--you'll want to switch to Size 1 if you notice interference or lines at the extreme edge of the image when in Size 2 mode--but at least it's there.


Convenience junkies will be bummed by the lack of picture-in-picture. Like many HDTV makers this year, Panasonic offers a version of control-over-HDMI, branded EZ-Synch, that allows other so-equipped Panasonic devices to be controlled via the HDMI connection using an on-screen interface and the TV's remote. We were disappointed, however, by the lack of menu item choices to deal with "image retention" or burn-in should it occur--features that can be found on many plasmas, including Panasonic's own professional models. (Update 08-06-2007) While the menu lacks burn-in-related items , this and all other 2007 Panasonic plasmas have an always-on "pixel wobbling" feature that imperceptibly shifts the image one pixel at a time to avoid burn-in. The 4:3 aspect ratio modes also include a screen saver, although it's useless when the TV is set to a widescreen (16:9) mode and you depend on an external souce, such as a cable box, to change aspect ratios.


Somewhat surprisingly for an HDTV in this price range, the TH-42PZ700U's connectivity suite includes not three HDMI inputs--as found on many high-end HDTVs this year--but just two. There's also a VGA-style PC input (1280x1024 maximum resolution), a pair of component-video inputs, two AV inputs with composite- and S-video, an RF-style antenna input, and an optical digital output for the ATSC tuner. A panel on the front flips up to reveal controls and another AV input with composite- and S-video, while a second panel hides a slot for SD, SDHC, and miniSD (adapter required) cards, allowing you to display JPEG digital photos on the big screen.


Panasonic also makes a pair of larger plasmas in its 1080p series: the 50-inch TH-50PZ700U and the 58-inch TH-58PZ700U.

Performance

At the end of our testing we were convinced that the Panasonic TH-42PX700U produced the best picture of any 42-inch flat-panel display, plasma or LCD, that we've reviewed so far. The credit doesn't necessarily go to the set's high resolution--in fact, depending on how close you like to sit, those extra pixels don't matter at all--but rather to its deep blacks, excellent shadow detail, and clean image. We'd definitely like to see more-accurate color, but that's our only real complaint.


Prior to setup we adjusted the Panasonic TH-42PZ700U's picture for optimal quality in our darkened theater. The Cinema preset came quite close to our ideal 40 ftl of brightness, and the Warm preset, the default for Cinema, produced a color temperature that approached the 6,500K standard (see the Geek Box for details), although it was skewed a bit toward green. As a result we didn't have to change the picture settings too much from the Cinema default. Click here for our complete user menu settings, or check out the Tips & Tricks section above. The Panasonic didn't contain user-menu fine controls for color temperature, and we did not perform a service-menu calibration, so there are no "after" numbers listed in the Geek Box below.


Next, we sat back to compare the TH-42PZ700U against some other flat-panel HDTVs. We didn't have another 42-inch plasma on hand for direct comparison, but we did have a couple of LCDs, namely the 46-inch Samsung LN-T4665F and Sony KDL-46S3000, as well as our reference display, the Pioneer PRO-FHD1 50-inch 1080p plasma. For the main section of our evaluation, we chose to watch Ghost Rider on Blu-ray, played from the Samsung BD-P1200 at 1080i resolution.


Black level performance is one of the most important ingredients in picture quality, so we always discuss it first, and by that measure Panasonic TH-42PZ700U got off on the right foot. Its shade of black was among the deepest we've seen, better than either the Sony or the Pioneer. Although the Samsung's image was objectively a bit darker overall, its relative lack of uniformity (the Samsung's sides are slightly brighter then the middle of the screen) made the Panasonic appear slightly darker to the naked eye, especially in the film's numerous nighttime scenes. The Panasonic's deep blacks were evident in the dark letterbox bars above and below the image, in the night sky as Mephistopheles approaches the tent of young Blaze, and in Mephistopheles' dark suit and the shadows of the tent background, for example.


Details in shadows was excellent as well; we could make out the folds in the suit and the depths in Blaze's black hair, and the rise from black up to shadow seemed quite natural. Also, unlike many Panasonic plasmas we've tested, the TH-42PZ700U maintained a constant level of black--black areas did not abruptly become brighter when the rest of the picture brightened--earning it a passing grade in the relevant Geek Box test.


Color accuracy was about average with the Panasonic TH-42PX700U. Like many Panasonic plasmas, its primary color of green measured quite a bit too yellow, while red was also somewhat off. Color decoding was also bit below average--the set's decoder undersaturated green and also introduced a small amount of red push, so we had to back off the color control slightly to achieve the most accurate-looking skin tones. As a result, colors appeared less saturated than we observed on the reference Pioneer, but they were still quite lush. When Roxanne and mature Blaze have it out on the freeway, for example, her face appeared very slightly yellower and less realistic then on the Pioneer, as did the grass in Blaze's cemetery. Overall, the set's deep black levels helped its colors appear rich and well-saturated nonetheless, and we weren't overly distracted by the inaccuracies we mentioned.


We've complained about false contouring on some previous Panasonic plasmas, such as the 42-inch TH-42PX77U, but the TH-42PZ700U handled gradations in brightness quite well. We did see traces of contouring in the most difficult areas, such along the edge of the backlit silhouette of the Caretaker when the picture fades to black, but for the most part the image was smooth. We also noticed less video noise, which appears as roiling motes most visible in very dark areas, than on most plasmas we've reviewed, although the Pioneer was again a bit cleaner overall.


As expected, the Panasonic delivered superb detail, from the amazing sculptured CGI chrome and flames on skull-head Blaze's bike, to the texture of the cement on the gravestones. When we checked the set's resolution we found that it fully resolved every line of the 1080i test pattern from our Sencore HDTV signal generator, and handled 1080p/60 and signals as well (it could not display 1080p/24 from the Sencore, and the Samsung BD-P1200 would not allow us to select its 1080p/24 mode, so we assume the Panasonic cannot handle 1080p/24--not a big loss in our book anyway). It's worth noting, as always, that on a smaller screen the benefits of 1080p native resolution are less obvious than on a larger screen. For example, to be able to discern between the vanishingly thin one-pixel-wide lines of the Sencore's pattern, we had to sit about four feet from the screen. Any further back and they blended together, losing the benefits of 1080p.


In our 1080i de-interlacing test, courtesy of the HQV disc on HD DVD and Blu-ray, the Panasonic TH-42PZ700U performed about the same as most other displays we've tested. It passed the test for video resolution, preserving every line of detail, and failed the test for film resolution. As usual, we looked for evidence of the failure in real program material, and in this case we actually found some. As the camera rises over the freeway after Blaze and Roxanne's post-helicopter-jump kiss, the RV in the foreground evinced moiré artifacts that looked like artificial diagonal lines across the horizontal grille, on all of the displays except the Pioneer (which aces the film resolution test). When we switched to 1080p resolution, letting the Blu-ray player handle the processing, there was no moiré (except on the Sony, which has its own issues with 1080-resolution sources). Long story short, we recommend using a 1080p source, if possible, with the Panasonic, but its lack of proper 1080i de-interlacing isn't a major issue.


We were also anxious to check out the Panasonic's glare-reducing screen, and in general it performed about as well as that of the Samsung HP-T5064. In other words, while it attenuated some of the light that hit the screen, the glare-reducing coating wasn't nearly as effective as that found on the screen of Panasonic's TH-PX77U plasmas or standard matte-screen LCDs, like the Sony.


Next we observed standard-def sources delivered at 480i over component-video from the HQV test disc, and the Panasonic TH-42PZ700U turned in an above-average performance. The color bars pattern revealed that the plasma resolved every detail of the DVD format on the vertical axis but not the horizontal, which might contribute to the slightly softer details we saw in the stone bridge and grass from HQV's detail test. The Panasonic did a fine job removing jagged edges from diagonal lines, however, and it smoothed out the stripes in a waving American flag quite well. The set's various noise reduction settings cleaned up the snowy-looking skies and sunsets nicely without causing undue softness. The Panasonic also passed the 2:3 pulldown detection test, although it was slower to engage film mode than many HDTV we've tested.


As a PC monitor connected via the VGA-style input, we found the TH-42PZ700U's performance a bit disappointing compared to most flat-panel LCDs. It cannot handle 1,920x1,080 resolution signals via VGA; when we fed it that signal, the desktop was overscanned significantly (it didn't fit on the screen, so we had to scroll to see the edges of the desktop). The highest signal it scaled properly was just 1,280x1,024, and due to the scaling the edges of text appeared soft and the entire desktop was stretched quite a bit (the manual indicated that the set will also handle 1,366x768, a wide-screen resolution that should look better, but the TV would not allow us to select that option with the video cards we used). We had much better luck connecting our PC's DVI output to the TH-42PX700U's HDMI input. In this configuration the plasma displayed every detail of a 1,920x1,080 resolution source, text looked quite sharp, and overscan was nonexistent. In other words, if you plan on connecting a PC to this display, you'll have better luck going digital and monopolizing an HDMI input.



Geek box

TEST RESULT SCORE

Before color temp (20/80) 6,200/5,795K Average

After color temp N/A

Before grayscale variation +/- 492K Good

After grayscale variation N/A

Color of red (x/y) 0.658/0.332 Average

Color of green 0.267/0.661 Poor

Color of blue 0.148/0.063 Good

Overscan 0 percent Good

Black-level retention All patterns stable Good

Defeatable edge enhancement Yes Good

480i 2:3 pull-down, 24 fps Yes Good

1080i video resolution Pass Good

1080i film resolution Fail Poor




Juice box

Panasonic TH-42PZ700U

Picture settings Default Calibrated Power Save

Picture on (watts) 464.07 318.00 N/A

Picture on (watts/sq. inch) 0.62 0.42 N/A

Standby (watts) 0.58 0.58 N/A

Cost per year $141.28 $96.92 N/A


Score (considering size) Poor

Score (overall) Poor
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsskid /forum/post/12917952


The PZ700U accepts the 1080p/24 signal and converts it to 1080p/60

No it doesn't.
 

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Question 1:


At 10-11 feet for viewing, what's better a 50" Panny 720 or 1080?


Question 2:


If the answer is 1080, what's better that or a 58" 720?


Those are my 3 choices, don't want to go more than the cost of the 58" 720.


Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cart_man /forum/post/12949020


Question 1: At 10-11 feet for viewing, what's better a 50" Panny 720 or 1080?

That will completely depend on if you can see the SDE on the 720p set at your 10-11 foot viewing distance. I clearly see the SDE on all the 50" 720p sets at that distance, but i'm in the minority and the majority of people will either see no difference, or a slight enough difference that the extra cost of the 1080p set is not worth that difference. But another thing is that the processing is better on the 1080p set and it has more colors so aside from the SDE thing, you still might see an improvement with the 1080p model. You have to go to stores or friends houses and look at both models and see if you can see the SDE at 10-11 feet. Chances are that you will not see it. Also compare the processing on the store's HD loop. When i was shopping this past summer and compared these in various stores and i saw a distinct difference between the PX75U and PZ700U's processing in fast-motion sports scenes and when the spectators took flash pictures during night time sports. The PX75U displayed macroblocking while the PZ700 remained considerably smoother and handled the scenes better.

Quote:
Question 2: If the answer is 1080, what's better that or a 58" 720?

Well if the answer is 1080p, then obviously the 50" 720p set is unacceptable so the even bigger 58" 720p set will be even more unacceptable. But you may find that both the 50" and 58" 720p sets look fine at your viewing distance - it depends on your particular eyesight and also your source for TV broadcasts as well as the content you watch.


I do think the 1080p models outperform their 720p counterparts overall.
 

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Hello,


I have been reading the postings here for several weeks and have been paying attention to the break-in posts as my new TH-42PZ700U will be arriving tomorrow (very excited!). The break-in suggestions that have been offered in several locations and the new "newbie thread" have been very helpful. However, I decided to download the owners manual for the 42PZ700u to get ready for the break in. Now, in spite of my reading the "manual" and your generous suggestions, I am having difficulty translating them into actions! It seems like the terms in the manual don't quite correspond those being used in this forum.


I appreciate the newbie suggestions very much but, although I understand the concepts, I can't see quite how to translate them into menu actions. For example, I cannot find " Engage the 4:3 mode" in the manual. Could someone please actually translate these suggestions into menu steps or hints for me?


(Paraphrased suggestions from the newbie help thread 1-13)


-- When your plasma TV is initially installed, you should:


1. Make sure the plasma TV is in the "Just" mode?


2. Turn down the Picture setting (in the Picture menu) to +0?


3. Briefly engage the 4:3 mode and confirm the side bars are set to "Mid", or "Bright"?


4. Always return the display mode that fills the screen (such as Just, Zoom, Full, or H-FILL)?


Thank you all very much,


Ron
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAMcKinnon /forum/post/12952610


....in spite of my reading the "manual" and your generous suggestions, I am having difficulty translating them into actions! It seems like the terms in the manual don't quite correspond those being used in this forum.


...I can't see quite how to translate them into menu actions. For example, I cannot find " Engage the 4:3 mode" in the manual. Could someone please actually translate these suggestions into menu steps or hints for me?


(Paraphrased suggestions from the newbie help thread 1-13)


-- When your plasma TV is initially installed, you should:


1. Make sure the plasma TV is in the "Just" mode?


2. Turn down the Picture setting (in the Picture menu) to +0?


3. Briefly engage the 4:3 mode and confirm the side bars are set to "Mid", or "Bright"?


4. Always return the display mode that fills the screen (such as Just, Zoom, Full, or H-FILL)?

Your PZ700U's remote will have a very important key called ASPECT. Repeated pressing of this key cycles through the various stretch modes, one of which is the "4.3" mode which will display side bars to the left and right of the 4:3 image. The TV's settings menu gives you the ability to change the color of these 4:3 side bars so what they're saying is to (A) use the ASPECT key to put the TV into 4:3 mode, then (B) go into the settings menu and change the color of the sidebars to BRIGHT. This is only if you'll be watching the TV in 4:3 mode, but you should really be using the JUST stretch mode for 4:3 programming anyway. They're just making sure that the sidebar setting is on Bright in case you watch 4:3 programming without stretching it.


I'm not so sure if setting the Picture setting to zero will be sufficient to break in the panel - i think it's too dark to do much good and actually prolongs the break in period. On my 42PZ700U i used a high picture setting (about +27) for normal TV watching, then before bedtime i'd reduce the Picture setting to like +15 and let it run full screen on DiscoveryHD overnight during my 150 hour break in period.
 

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Also a new 700U owner here,

Just got off the chat line with Panasonic about the break-in period and they stated that the recommendation was for earlier plasma displays and it was my option to perform the break-in on this new model. Also they suggested a picture setting of 10 to 15 if I were to perform break-in. Sounds like it is a not a complete requirement, chat with them, see if your answer varies from mine.


Jim
 

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Thanks JimMac for the info regarding your chat with Panasonic. There has been so much conflicting info and opinions on breakin for the Panasonics, it's good to hear a Panasonic tech's recommendations. Put's my mind at ease a bit.


Randy, I too think that zero was too dark, but left it there for about 40-50 hrs, and then bumped it up to 10 for another 30-40 hrs. I haven't done a claibration on it yet, but I did bump the setting up to 18 contrast, 10 brightness, which seems to look pretty good.


Also, Randy, thanks for the MountAvision referrel for Mack's extended warranties. Got a great deal on mine there. Saved over $300 from what Circuit City wanted, and got and extra year to boot, since Mack's warranty doesn't kick-in until after the 1 yr manufacturers warranty expires, and C.C's in concurrent.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyWalters /forum/post/12954241


Your PZ700U's remote will have a very important key called ASPECT. Repeated pressing of this key cycles through the various stretch modes, one of which is the "4.3" mode which will display side bars to the left and right of the 4:3 image. The TV's settings menu gives you the ability to change the color of these 4:3 side bars so what they're saying is to (A) use the ASPECT key to put the TV into 4:3 mode, then (B) go into the settings menu and change the color of the sidebars to BRIGHT. This is only if you'll be watching the TV in 4:3 mode, but you should really be using the JUST stretch mode for 4:3 programming anyway. They're just making sure that the sidebar setting is on Bright in case you watch 4:3 programming without stretching it.

Thanks for the advice Randy. Are you suggesting that anytime one watches 4:3 programming unstretched one should have bright sidebars? (Not just during break-in).


I think I am misunderstanding the nature of plasma technology since my intuition would suggest that black is "no signal" and therefore harmless as far as burn-in/IR. Can someone please clarify this for me?


Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #19

Quote:
Originally Posted by RAMcKinnon /forum/post/12976736


Thanks for the advice Randy. Are you suggesting that anytime one watches 4:3 programming unstretched one should have bright sidebars? (Not just during break-in).


I think I am misunderstanding the nature of plasma technology since my intuition would suggest that black is "no signal" and therefore harmless as far as burn-in/IR. Can someone please clarify this for me?


Ron

The problem the black bars create is the uneven wear on the phosphors, which could create image retention, even if it's only for a brief time.
 

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