AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,632 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe we can get the opinion of every avsforum member on this device. See what the true opinion on this hot dvd recorder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,632 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Come on people. Some seem to enjoy it while others bash it. Here is a poll where you can express if it was owrth the money or it wasnt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
It depends how much money you have to burn. it was worth it for me just to hear from my friends how great the DVD I burned for them at XP mode looked :)


These things probably won't be $1000 in a years time and somebody is bound to come out with a more fully featured unit. But for right now, it's the bees knees. (I also know that you can get them for a lot less than $1000... but best buy has interest free financing until 2004)


After using the HDD on it for a while it is definitely worth the $300 premium over the E30.


Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
You know when something is good if you use it in a seamless manor and don't even think about it being there. The HS2 Does it all, it works flawless, it makes recordings that look 98% as good as my C-Band best stations. The inputs are just right for almost every kind of hookup, and best off all the unit is setup in an intuitive manor that is simple to use. I have yet to make a coaster and have had no lockups or problems.

I give it a 9 out 10 with a loss of one point for the awful user manual, of course most of us men will like trying to figure it out ourselves and wont normally read the manual, and for this unit it is so well layed out that the manual is not neccassary for 80% of the operations but in this case I have one major gripe in that I still cannot figure out what good play-list are and how to get them on the DVD-R, and the manual is no use in this regard.


YOU WILL LOVE IT!!!


(No I don't sell them and my name is not Joe Panasonic :) )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
590 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by jgarth
The HS2 Does it all, it works flawless, it makes recordings that look 98% as good as my C-Band best stations.
jgarth, I have the same C-band-to-HS2 setup as you and I am as thrilled as you seem to be about this little miracle machine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,632 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am sorry if i sound like a dummy but what is c-band?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Quote:
I have one major gripe in that I still cannot figure out what good play-list are and how to get them on the DVD-R, and the manual is no use in this regard.
jgarth -


I did a timed XP recording last night off a digital cable video channel last night. It recorded for 3 hours. I went into the playlist area and set up a playlist item for this recording. Within one playlist I created about 35 scenes, each one a different video, and cutting out the commercials. When I was finished I titled that one playlist as "Music Videos". Now, when I want to watch some of those videos, I jump into the playlist section, select that playlist and hit play. It runs for 2 hours straight without all the commercials. If I want to put it on DVD-R, I go into the dubbing area, go into the content area, and then select the tab at the top for playlist items, then select that playlist.


I always use playlists when I dub DVD-R's. In the above scenerio, I wouldn't create a single playlist with multiple scenes. I would go through the tedious process of creating a playlist for every music video, complete with the title (song name and artist). I would end up with 5 menu pages on the DVD-R with every song listed. That way I can jump to any song I want.


Tux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Going into the fourth month and I still love the HS-2. It is a dream come true for people looking to archive their favorite movies and videos. I find recording directly from my DTV/Tivo receiver onto the HDD at XP and then dumping the edited final onto DVD-R using FR mode is perfect for my archiving needs. Smooth as pie!



Jgarth: Playlists are also handy if you need to add video black to the beginning or ending of an edited movie or TV show.


Happy Recording!

Peter M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,566 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by TuxOmatic


I always use playlists when I dub DVD-R's. In the above scenerio, I wouldn't create a single playlist with multiple scenes. I would go through the tedious process of creating a playlist for every music video, complete with the title (song name and artist). I would end up with 5 menu pages on the DVD-R with every song listed. That way I can jump to any song I want.
One thing I'm confused about from this description..


Is it possible to do BOTH of these?


That is, could I have one menu item that played the _entire_ thing with no breaks, and also have menus for each individual video?


One of the things I'd convert when I get one of these machines is a whole bunch of videotapes with music performances from talk shows and so on I've recorded over the years. I'd like to be able to play it as one long recording (i.e. as background music), or pick specific songs.


If not, I'd just pick one of the choices.. (I'd probably end up ripping the music to my iPod for 'background music' listening anyway.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
mattack -


Yes, you can do both.


Let's say you record 5 episodes of "Friends" during the week. You have 5 separate "programs", complete with commercials. You go into the playlist area and create a playlist for each episode. Since each episode has lots of commercials, you create multiple "scenes" within each playlist by flagging the beginning and ending points for each scene, cutting out the commercials. You end up with 5 playlists, each one consisting of at least 4 scenes. Only the playlist items will be selectable from the menu, not the individual scenes. In the example from the previous post, I mentioned having a separate playlist item for each music video, but each playlist would only have one scene.


Keep in mind that when you put in your finished DVD-R and display your menu, it doesn't make any difference if you have just one playlist item that runs 2 hours or 12 playlists that run 10 minutes each. When you press play on the remote, the disk will play from beginning to end. If you select the 4th item on the menu, it will play the 4th playlist item and then continue to play until it reaches the end of the disk, or until you press the menu button to return to the menu.


The chapter jumps are kinda different. When you chapter jump ahead, it will only jump about 5 minutes further in the video, or to the next playlist item, whichever is first. If you chapter jump towards the beginning, when you reach the beginning of a playlist item, the next jump is to the beginning of the previous playlist item, ignoring the 5 minute rule. Very weird.


And finally, when you use playlists, and the disk is playing from beginning to end, everytime it reaches a spot where you have a new playlist, there is a noticable pause for a second. As an example, let's say you recorded a movie and you wanted to setup multiple playlists to resemble the scene selection feature of a factory DVD. Everytime the movie reaches the beginning of one of those playlists, the movie pauses. Playlists work much better if you have fade-ins and fade-outs for each playlist item, like separate episodes, family events, music videos, etc.


Hope that helps.


Tux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
Tux, in your last paragraph you answered my question, so it seems that playlists are not a solution to the problem I had with pausing... I recorded my first DVD-R a little different though:


I recorded a 6-hour marathon, 6 hour-long shows all at once. In order to achieve the same effect I first edited out the commercials using the shorten program feature. Then I divided the program into 6 parts, with the division point being at the front of the show. What are the differences between your method and mine?


Both sustain a noticeable pause when the disk is playing straight through. One difference is that I would end up with 6 distinct, edited programs right on my HDD, and it gets kind of cluttered. You would end up with one 6-hour program unedited on the HDD, and 6 playlists. Also, you can always go back and change edit points, whereas my method is permanent and non-reversible. Any other differences that you can see?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Felgar -


Yes, you are right about the extra hard drive space I’m wasting. In the example I used about making playlists with the Friends episodes, since each episode was a separate recorded program, using the program editing features would be better if you plan on keeping them on the hard drive for a while. (Which is usually the case if you are gradually recording multiple episodes of the same show.) The commercials would be permanently erased. Otherwise, the end result would be the same if you create playlists or program edit. I guess I’m in a rut. I always use playlists, even if it’s not required. Actually, I was not aware that you would get the brief pauses when editing a program in the program editor. Bummer.


For those of you that I might have confused, playlists work much better in these situations (IMO):


1. If you copy a VHS or DV tape unattended with multiple events on it (or a 6 hour marathon of Dukes of Hazard – hehehehe), and you want each event to have it’s own menu item. Create a playlist for each event and give it a title for the menu.


2. If you copy a long event from VHS or DV, and you want to create several DVD-R’s from that event, but you want each DVD-R to be unique. You flag the parts that would interest Aunt Martha for one playlist, the parts would interest Grandpa Joe for another, etc. Actually, this would also apply to example #1. If you have several different events on a single recorded program, you can dub unique DVD-R’s, using whichever events that may be of interest to the recipient.


3. Chapter jumps work in playlists with multiple scenes on the hard drive. I mentioned in my previous post that I have a 3 hour recording on my hard drive of music videos, complete with commercials. I created a single playlist with about 35 scenes in it, each one a separate music video, ending up with 2 hours of videos. As pointed out, by doing this I waste 1 hour of XP hard drive space. On the plus side, when I go into the playlist to play these videos I can use the chapter skip feature to jump from one video to the beginning of the next video. I’m not going to keep these videos on my hard drive for very long. It’s just a temporary entertainment thing, but if you want to record something on your hard drive for playback only, and you want the ability to jump to specific points, then creating a playlist with multiple scenes will do the job.


Remember that playlists do not edit the actual recorded program, but they are linked to them. You will loose your playlists if you edit or delete the original recorded program, or if you move it to DVD-RAM.


Hope any of this helps. If I’m wrong about anything I wrote, feel free to let me know. I’m just barely figuring this thing out myself. This machine is sooo cool!


Tux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
OK. I'm lost.


I've been using my HS2 by recording tv programs, such as the U2 special on CBS or Taken on the Sci-fi channel and the editing out the commercials with the "shorten segment" option.


I can watch them on the HDD or burn them to disk, whatever I do it plays just what I want to watch.


If I want two programs, I divide it and title each one separately.


I have yet to use a playlist for anything, but I know that they must have some valid use. So assuming that I do everything that way, what do I stand to gain from using playlists? (Tux - I understand your enthusiasm for playlists - once i've found my 'way' of doing something, I'm happy with it and I'm sure you're the same way... but all you've highlighted is that playlists are an alternative to "editing").


Presumably playlists would be great if I wanted to rejoin two programs, right? suppose I recorded half of an episode of "Taken" and then recorded the other half on the following broadcast. I could merge the two halves together by creating a playlist.


Or if CBS screwed up the broadcast of "U2 live from Slane" and played the songs in the wrong order, I could create a playlist that played the songs 1, 3, 2, 5, 4 instead of 1,2,3,4,5 if I was a chronophile.


Can I create a playlist that plays seemlessly on a DVD but lets me specify markers.


Eg. I have one file called "U2 live at slane" but have chapters within it called "Intro" "Elevation" "Beautiful Day" "Walk On" etc.?


I could do that in programs by creating a separate program, but it wouldn't play seemlessly (at least I don't think it does - never really left a DVD-R I burned playing past the end of a segment to see whether it returns you to the menu.


Somebody sell me on why I need playlists given my current approach. I'm not bashing your approach - just want to know what I'm missing :)


Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,500 Posts
Thanks for the input Tux. I appreciate your insight on where playlists can be used. If DVD-RAM media got a little cheaper, could a guy use playlists in that music video example right on a disc? Then it would be like having thumbnailed chapters on all the dvds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Playlists are non-destructive, if you make an error in setting the start and end points you just do it again. With shorten segment, once you delete a piece it is gone.


Playlists can also be used for simple assemble editing (you can change the order around and combine pieces of multiple recordings, so yes, you could put the two pieces of Taken back together in the right order.)


Shorten segment recovers the deleted space.


A shortened segment can be dubbed at high speed to DVD-RAM. Playlists only dub in real time.


To have access to specific pieces of video, you'd have to create a playlist for each segment. Alternatively you could split the recording, but that cannot be undone and seems to be done only on I-Frames(?) Both of these approaches may result in a slight pause at the end of each segment, although I'm not sure about that.


Yes, you can create playlists on a DVD-RAM disk.


Personally, I use shorten segment most of the time due to the ability to dub to DVD-RAM at high speed. When recording directly to DVD-RAM it makes timing less critical in recording a second one hour program onto one DVD-RAM disk as you have about 1 hour 16 minutes of space left after removing commercials from the first hour.


David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Gee, I guess we went off topic with this playlist stuff. Sorry about that RAVEN56706! I think it was jgarth's fault.


calebu2 –


Yes, once you start doing something a certain way it’s hard to think outside the box later down the road. And yes, you are absolutely right. In most cases, using either method is like two paths to the same destination, especially if the plan is to dub to DVD-R. To be honest, I don’t know which path is easier or quicker since I don’t use the program edit features. I think the reason I use the playlist method is the type of content I record and the finality of the edit. I don’t normally record regular TV programs with the intent of dubbing to DVD-R. I have a list of timed recordings of weekly shows, but those are just for viewing at more convenient times. Most of my recordings that end up on DVD-R are family video projects and full length movies from a DVD source or a pay channel. Like I said in my previous post, if you record TV episodes over a period of time with the intent to dub, then the program edit features are the best way. To me, the reason it’s the best way is because each recording has elements that you obviously want to remove and will never want later (i.e., the commercials). When I record a movie off the pay channel, I might want to remove something offensive, so either path is still OK. But the bulk of my recordings that will end up on DVD-R are my family video projects. This is where I use the strength of the playlist option. The edits are NOT final, so I can create many unique playlists from the same recording. After dubbing a DVD-R, I can go back and move the flags around for a different dub, or change the order of each scene. One playlist can have bits and pieces from several recordings without altering those recordings.


When you dub to DVD, the HS2 inserts in own markers every 5 minutes. Each menu item will also have it’s own marker. When you asked about seamless playback, are you asking if it plays from beginning to end? As far as I know, the playback is the same whether you use playlists to get your “chapters†or use program edit. It will play from beginning to end, or from whichever “chapter†you select to the end, unless you press the menu button.


From the projects you described, I don’t see how using playlists will give you any advantages. If you don’t want to have 2 items on your menu for “Taken†(like “Part 1†& “Part 2â€), then you can use a single playlist for both halves, like dgb just said.



dgb –


Thanks for your post. I learned a couple of things. I didn’t know you could only get high speed dubs to DVD-RAM using a shortened segment. The only thing I’ve used DVD-RAM for was timed recordings of movies, but I bought some more of them and wanted to try some new things. I also didn’t know you can create playlists on a DVD-RAM disk. Hmmm. I guess I’ll have to spend some more time tonight playing around with the HS2 . . . . yeah, baby!


Tux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I love my HS2. I also got a Sony DRU-500a for my PC and if I had to choose between the two, the HS2 wins hands down as far as ease of operation. The hard drive is a must have as far as stand alone recorders go. Being able to edit sitting on the couch is great and makes for great archives.

Another great thing about the HS2 is that it outputs what ever signal you input to component out. This was handy because I wanted to use only component out to my projector, and the HS2 saved me from having to run S-video also, and to having to unplug one or the other.

Eventually I will archive all my VHS tapes to DVD. My shelves will look nice without all the clutter of tapes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Thanks that clears up part of it.

When you burn this playlist to DVD-R you get the playlist with the 35 scenes available, when I burned my first DVD-RAM I burned it from a playlist with sub items but all I ended up with was one item in my main menu. I theorized after that, that you needed to split the program up physically then burn each part onto the DVD, thats if you wanted to have scene selection like a commercial DVD. After this failure I kind of gave up on playlist, but from reading what you are saying it is that Playlist don't get transfered to DVD-RAM only DRD-R.

This is my first unit for DVD burning so please forgive me if I sound like a dolt. For now because of my "coaster Fear" I have just been burning complete programs. I will give it another try and do the Playlist on DVD-R.



Thanks again for the info



Quote:
Originally posted by TuxOmatic
jgarth -


I did a timed XP recording last night off a digital cable video channel last night. It recorded for 3 hours. I went into the playlist area and set up a playlist item for this recording. Within one playlist I created about 35 scenes, each one a different video, and cutting out the commercials. When I was finished I titled that one playlist as "Music Videos". Now, when I want to watch some of those videos, I jump into the playlist section, select that playlist and hit play. It runs for 2 hours straight without all the commercials. If I want to put it on DVD-R, I go into the dubbing area, go into the content area, and then select the tab at the top for playlist items, then select that playlist.


I always use playlists when I dub DVD-R's. In the above scenerio, I wouldn't create a single playlist with multiple scenes. I would go through the tedious process of creating a playlist for every music video, complete with the title (song name and artist). I would end up with 5 menu pages on the DVD-R with every song listed. That way I can jump to any song I want.


Tux
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Quote:
When you burn this playlist to DVD-R do you get the playlist with the 35 scenes available or do you just get one item and it will run through it from start to finish?
I would only get one item on the menu and it will play from beginning to end. If I make a playlist for each song I would end up with 35 menu items. Splitting it up physically will accomplish the same thing. The only difference is that the playlist method won't alter the original recording.


Tux
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top