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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought the Panasonic TH-50pz80u.


It does not have a PC input port so I looked into a VGA to HDMI converter. Got one today and hooked it up.


The only two resolutions that worked was 640x480 and 1024x768. The 1024 showed a wiggle line down the middle.


The resolution I was hoping for was 800x600. Is that possible with this and if so what would I need to get a sharper image (other than SVHS)?


Any help is appreciated!

John
 

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Sounds like a limitation on your PC's video card and/or the VGA converter.


For better resolution selections you need a video card with a DVI output and the ability to select a variety of resolutions, then a simple DVI to HDMI cable can be used.

I have an ATI video card that supports 1360x768 and higher and has the option for either VGA or DVI type output.

ATI also can adjust position and size of the image.

With the 50PZ80U you can use HDsize=2 for zero overscan, perfect for a DVI->HDMI connection from a good PC video card.
 

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In the Panasonic 50PZ80U owner's manual they list the supported resolution signal formats supported on the HDMI inputs:

480i @60Hz (720x480)

480p @60Hz (720x480)

720p @60Hz (1280x720)

1080i @60Hz (1920x1080)

1080p @60Hz (1920x1080)

1080p @24Hz (1920x1080)


Many ATI PC video cards support both 1280x720 (720p) and 1920x1080 (1080i) at 60Hz progressive that should be compatible with a DVI->HDMI cable.


1024x768 is not a supported HDMI format so that would explain problems with that.

640x480 was probably working as 480i or 480p mode.


The separate VGA input on the PZ85U plasma models supports more standard PC resolutions but not the highest native 1920x1080 resolution. So it would be better for a direct VGA input, unless you have a video card with DVI output that can handle 1280x720 or better 1920x1080 directly.
 

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If you do get an DVI to HDMI cable, use 1920x1080, progressive. That's a common resolution which shouldn't be difficult for any semi-modern computer.
 
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