AVS Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what is the peak acoustical power of common musical instruments such as a kick drum ?


somebody must have collected such data.


if we know that and we know that a given speaker has say 1% efficiency then we could roughly calculate the power needed to faithfully reproduce the signal.


we could use decibels to do that but then we would need to account for factors like distance, baffle step, room gain etc.


i just want to compare apples to apples - watts to watts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Hey Vas, that's an interesting question. Acoustic watts....won't be influenced by the environment etc.


However musical instruments are rarely specced in how loud they do, as even for an individual instrument "it depends". Also some instrument have projection abilities that are quite different from others, eg brass vs bass drum. Taking a kick drum for eg (Ricci plays that with ear plugs!), how big is it 16" or 26"? What is the tuning? Which head? How strong is the drummer? One thing's for sure, this thing's loud and is in the 130-140 range peak.

Big Percussive instruments are usually loud, size matters for musical instruments.


I read that a orchestra drum does as much as 25 acoustic watts for the orchestra crashes.

Taking 1% eff which is extremely high in the conventional hifi world, that would be 2500 watts?

But of course you do not listen to that thing up close. In the first row of the hall you get around 110dB peaks. Brass instruments in an orchestra are typically loud. Woodwinds are not that loud, but a piccolo does the high freqs and does project itself very well. Coupled with ear canal resonances, hearing damage in professional playing orchestral members is real esp after a good number of years. But typically orchestra members are more concerned with PROJECTION rather than sheer vol.


Of course everything is relative, we are interested in good reproduction so other than SQ, we would like to take care of the peaks and the SPL figs are high. If you are not exposing yourself to such levels daily and within limits its non-issue. You could get deaf if you open a retail store or HMV playing trance/pop/R&B for 12 hours a day, i figure they some do in the 75-80 region all day long.


Of course then there is our good old metal clan, that's loud with not so big a dynamic range. But that is usually amplified territory. Bro Thylantry likes his huge line array of high-power, high-eff expensive isoplanars and DIY.



Anyway, its like playing at reference. Which guy plays at ref or even +5 all day long. Nope. So the argument is that if you have something that does -10 or -5 it would be cool.

But if we are talking about high-performance, high-fidelity, state-of-the-art etc.... I guess the majority aim for a lower SPL than "live" and have good enough fidelity for their taste it is already quite satisfying. It is not easy to do high SQ and live levels.


"Power required to faithfully calculate to reproduce the signal". I think its not that easy to relate even in acoustic watts even if someone has the figures. We do not listen the same way in say an open or closed-venue live performance setting vs home env even assuming you have a well treated room. I have to say that live music usually are much more dynamic and louder than most people would think (assuming they are not exposed to live music on a regular basis). Last time when i was young and i was checking out different hifi speakers/systems, my ex-GF who plays in the orchestra always tell me that the systems are all too soft.
You can go into the demo area before a concert and check out how loud some of the stuff can do up close, if you are "new" you'd be surprised. I'd say that a lot of instruments are loud enough for you to "feel it"....even a small drum like a goblet drum (used in persian, turkish music)



The dynamic shades do play a big role in conveying the emotions in many genres of music played all over the world.


PS. No "lamers" or such words in this thread, we keep it clean.


Quote:
Originally Posted by vasyachkin /forum/post/17011630


what is the peak acoustical power of common musical instruments such as a kick drum ?


somebody must have collected such data.


if we know that and we know that a given speaker has say 1% efficiency then we could roughly calculate the power needed to faithfully reproduce the signal.


we could use decibels to do that but then we would need to account for factors like distance, baffle step, room gain etc.


i just want to compare apples to apples - watts to watts.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top