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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys and gals,


it may not be as Aesthetically pleasing as a NAD or Krell, but what do you think of this for over-the-top overbuilt heavy-duty industrial CD Transport?


I welcome any comments.


JPG photo attached.


-kspaz
 

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I own a NAD/Linn system, and would happily add that transport to it
 

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Only 14kg? How are you going to fit that 8kg platter and 5kg stablizer clamp on that? And the 10k motor required to spin that thing. And the Sony transport doesn't support a stable platter since the laser reads from the bottom. I don't see the space for a laboratory grade laser for the ST output.


Firewire has been deemed inadequate for high bit transport.


Is the remote control's cable made out of Siltech's reference cable?


What about some digital display for track number/time.


And finally, make those label stickers non-permanant so that whomever brings this unit back home, they could re-straighten them out.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by dr1394
By who and for what reason?


Ron
That is if the transport would also do multi-channel hi-rez audio.
 

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Meridian thinks the firewire bandwidth is not high enough for uncompressed DVD-A, thereby they have their higher bandwidth proprietary stuff.
 

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The maximum rate of 1394 is 400 Mbps, of which 320 Mbps

is available for bitstream transfer. The maximum

rate of 6-channel uncompressed DVD-A is 13.824 Mbps.

The 1394 audio protocol adds 14 bytes of overhead for

every 18 bytes of audio samples, bringing the actual

1394 rate to 24.576 Mbps.


A 320 Mbps 1394 bus is more than adequate for a

24.576 Mbps DVD-A bitstream.


Ron
 

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It is the jitter inherited in the 1394 interface. In order to re-clock the signals, you have to extract the multiple signals from the buffer, and reclock them at the same time maintaining proper timing between the signals.
 

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Quote:
It is the jitter inherited in the 1394 interface.
1394 interface jitter can easily be eliminated with a

rate controlled smoothing buffer at the receiver. A rate

control protocol described in a 1394 AV/C standard called

"AV/C Command Set for Rate Control of Isochronous Data Flow

1.0" is used.


The rate control protocol is a message from the receiver

that tells the source to either hold, speed up or slow down

the transmission rate of audio packets based on whether the

receivers smoothing buffer is slowly under or over-flowing.


This insures that the smoothing buffer never under

or over-flows and no audio samples are lost.


Of course, any buffering will delay the presentation

of the audio. So for audio only sources it's not an issue,

but for A/V sources (like DVD-V), it's a potential lip-sync

issue (depends on how much buffering is required).


The receiver can also recover the sampling clock from

the 1394 timestamps added to the stream without using

the rate control protocol. In which case, it needs a

VCXO to control the sampling rate of it's own DAC's

or converters based on the recovered sampling rate

from the stream.


The only downside to using a rate control protocol is

that a source can only be controlled by one receiver at

a time. Since most folks don't usually connect sources

to multiple receivers, it's not a big issue.

Quote:
In order to re-clock the signals, you have to

extract the multiple signals from the buffer, and reclock

them at the same time maintaining proper timing between

the signals.
You mean the individual channels? Isn't that an issue

that's independent of 1394? That is, even an analog output

player must seperate the channels from the disk bitstream

and clock each DAC properly.


Ron
 
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