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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever finished their own speakers in a piano black lacquer? How about refinishing a natural wood veneer in piano black? The reason I ask this is I am looking at purchasing some demo speakers in a black ash oak finish for about a third of the price that new ones would cost in my desired finish. I am a fairly capable wood worker (built my own entertainment center) and am wondering how logical this task might be. The reason for going piano black is my sub and surrounds have that finish already.

Does anyone have any info or could point me in the right direction?

Reality checks?
 

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Make sure you fill all the pores with paste wood filler of some sort. That should leave the surface smooth. Then apply the many coats of laquer. I refinished a paino, and it is very time consuming to get excellent results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, any resources I could read up on to get acquainted with the exact process? I have some spare oak wood that I was going to try to work my magic on before going big time.
 

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See my DIY inwall speaker thread nearby in this forum for hints. I used an automotive basecoat/clearcoat urethane for my project - gives a stunning mirror like finish when done (after a billion hours of sanding, prepping, polishing and so on :D ).
 

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Search on computer Case modding forums/ sites. They have a good walkthrough for you. Simply enough- sand smooth with 400 grit paper, then 800, 1000, 1500, 2000, and finally 3m polishing comound.
 

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You may be disappointed if your first attempt is on oak. It is an open grained wood that has lots of surface variation. Just a suggestion, but I would start using something like MDF or a flat metal surface.


The quality of the surface below telgraphs through the finish, so the rougher it is to start, the more prep work, filling, sanding you'll have to do. To get the best results, you'll want the smoothest starting surface. You'll still have to do lots of prep work as it is, as Mike has already mentioned.


Good luck.
 

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The one thing about piano black finished speakers that really sucks is how dusty they get. I had a pair of yamaha piano black finished floor speakers (I got them for very cheap) Anyway, they get very dusty and need to be dusted with canned air or microfiber clothes to avoid scratching the finish. It looks nice but it needs up keep.
 

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you could also get good results by BRUSHING on a latex polyurathane over black. New ploly's are very hard and durable, and with about 8 coats(which won't take that long cause latex dries fast) you could have a surface that you could wet sand perfectly flat with 600 or greater. The key to getting that piano finish is using a minwax or equivalent paste wax. Put on a couple coats of that and you won't beleive the depth. I wouldn't worry about the oak being to porus because I used the same method of clear over my walnut coffee table. For everyone that doesn't believe me you'll just have to give it a try!


-Trent-
 

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TnErT,

I'm currently building a set of large corner horns for a 2-channel system. I've veneered about a dozen speakers but never done any kind of black finish. Did you sand or wet sand between each layer of latex poly? Also, did you use 600 grit or greater on each coat or did you work up to that?
 

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Jeff, as long as you don't have much dust specs on each coat, it's not necessary to sand between each coat. Also, poly finishes aren't suitable for wetsanding - just use a fine grit like 400 or 600 to smooth off objectional dust specs between coats, if needed. It's the final coat that needs to be ultra fine block sanded with 600 grit, followed by the key to making a mirror shine with poly finishes, which is the paste wax TnErT was referring to. I use a fine steel wool to actually APPLY the paste wax, which allows me to skip the sanding step, followed by buffing with a soft cloth. But if you want to insure a truly flat surface, block sand, then apply wax with cloth, then buff. After this, use pledge with wax (or equivalent) for a final sheen polishing and you'll have a very, very shiny and super smooth finish.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by M NEWMAN
Jeff, as long as you don't have much dust specs on each coat, it's not necessary to sand between each coat. Also, poly finishes aren't suitable for wetsanding - just use a fine grit like 400 or 600 to smooth off objectional dust specs between coats, if needed. It's the final coat that needs to be ultra fine block sanded with 600 grit, followed by the key to making a mirror shine with poly finishes, which is the paste wax TnErT was referring to. I use a fine steel wool to actually APPLY the paste wax, which allows me to skip the sanding step, followed by buffing with a soft cloth. But if you want to insure a truly flat surface, block sand, then apply wax with cloth, then buff. After this, use pledge with wax (or equivalent) for a final sheen polishing and you'll have a very, very shiny and super smooth finish.
Mike is right, as long as your in a farely dust free enviroment sanding inbetween is not necessary and should be done ONLY to knock off the highs. Rememeber your trying to build up your finish to add depth and allow you to block sand perfectly flat your final coat. On my coffee table I knocked down dust particles if it was bad with 220 grit dry lightly as 220 doesn't get build up on the surface to gouge the finish. After you have your coats of poly applied I used 600 wet dry with a hard rubber (auto) sanding block. I DID sand the finish wet allowing a day of curing before. It sands just like auto clear. Wipe off water to see where your lows are(they will be shiny) Keep sanding until you have a perfectly flat surface. There is no need for steel wool this way and you can just apply paste wax directly with a cotton shirt on the surface. Put on two to three coats and you won't beleive your eyes!


-Trent-
 
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