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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When recording home movies and satellite movies, which pioneer unit will give me the best recorded quality ? Also is it a big visual difference or hardly noticable?


Thanks :Dwain
 

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Since I don't have both to compare I'll jump in with my assumptions. The 533 has a new MPEG encoder that allows up to 10 hours of content to fit on a DVD and it also has XP+ mode which is a very high resolution that only is playable from the hard drive. So my sense is that you'll have a better picture quality with the 533 at XP+ mode and at the lower bit rates. But at the 1-hour to 2 hour 20 minute settings that the 520 encodes at 720x480 resolution, my sense is the difference won't be noticeable.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwain
When recording home movies and satellite movies, which pioneer unit will give me the best recorded quality ? Also is it a big visual difference or hardly noticable?


Thanks :Dwain
I don't know if the new models produce a better picture at the same REC Mode as the older models, but it does have a better encoding system. In the old models, even at SP I noticed, for sports or fast action scenes, you get macroblocks. In the new models, it's non-existent. The older models, at the 2:20 mark which is the longest you can go with 720x480, the picture would heavily pixelate during fast sequences, whereas the new models don't have this at all. I was very surprised. You do see some hazing or greyish colors around the dark colors though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dollarbill
I don't know if the new models produce a better picture at the same REC Mode as the older models, but it does have a better encoding system. In the old models, even at SP I noticed, for sports or fast action scenes, you get macroblocks. In the new models, it's non-existent. The older models, at the 2:20 mark which is the longest you can go with 720x480, the picture would heavily pixelate during fast sequences, whereas the new models don't have this at all. I was very surprised. You do see some hazing or greyish colors around the dark colors though.
Agreed, the new recorders do much better at recording performance than I ever seen from another. This wasn't a mild difference but a major difference. The DVR-531H records better in SP than my DVR-420 records in Fine/XP!

See my thread here about the quality.


Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If I ge tthe pioneer 531 without the dv input how will I go about recording from my camcorder? will I have to record from the camcorder onto VHS then onto a disc ?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwain
If I ge tthe pioneer 531 without the dv input how will I go about recording from my camcorder? will I have to record from the camcorder onto VHS then onto a disc ?


Just record using your Camcorder's S-Video output to the DVD Recorder's S-Video input. Many have said this is the preferred method as you can get the correct black level and custom picture adjustments this way.


DV has a black level of 0 IRE and will record as such unless you can change the DV output to the standard 7.5 IRE level. If you can't, you'll have washed out pictures. Also, you can't use any picture adjustments on the DV input so what you have is what you'll have to record with. Don't think this is the highest performance either, the DV signal still has to be encoded to MPEG2 just like your analog signal. Also, I don't know about this recorder, but some recorders create new chapters when a change in contrast is detected and when the camcorder was put in pause. This was a frustration of others last year in the posts.


So many found the ideal way of recording camcorder videos was through the S-Video. Maybe some will disagree or agree and chime in.


BTW, Onecall.com is selling the DVR-533H for $369 which comes out to be the same as Walmarts price since no shipping or tax is charged from onecall. However you have to give a signature to receive and for me, this is a major pain as my UPS shippers won't deliver when I'm home, or even schedule a drop off when I'm home. That's why I try to avoid online shopping when possible. Besides, I bought with my Visa and that doubles the manufacturers warranty to 2 years PLUS Walmart has a 90 day return policy if something is wrong with it. I really like that as I've used that 90 days quite a bit.


So it's up to you whether you want the DV input, or the better return policy and ease of buying.


Onecall's return policy is definitely not the best as seen here ,
Quote:
Return Of Defective Items

OneCall allows you to return defective merchandise within 30 days of your purchase date. You may choose a full-credit product exchange or a full credit by the same means payment was made. Please include a detailed written description of the defect and how to replicate the problem. Merchandise found to be non-defective will be subject to a 15% restocking fee. Additional fees may be assessed for missing hardware.
So if they can't or won't find your problem, you'll pay ~$54 to return it. That says nothing about design bugs so you'll likely pay the $54 if your not happy with it's design. With Walmart, you have 90 days to use all of the recorders functions to make sure they are all properly operating without defects or design bugs.


Have a good one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Up
BTW, Onecall.com is selling the DVR-533H for $369 which comes out to be the same as Walmarts price since no shipping or tax is charged from onecall.
Mike Up, I am not finding the Pioneer DRV-533H for sale on Walmarts online site. Are you, or anyone else, still seeing it there?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvder
Mike Up, I am not finding the Pioneer DRV-533H for sale on Walmarts online site. Are you, or anyone else, still seeing it there?


I think what he's saying is that you can get the 533 from OneCall for the same or less than you'd pay for a 531 from Walmart.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dvder
Mike Up, I am not finding the Pioneer DRV-533H for sale on Walmarts online site. Are you, or anyone else, still seeing it there?
The DVR-531H is the only Pioneer HDD DVD Recorder at Walmart. They don't list the DVR-531H or the none HDD DVR-233 model on their website, as they look like they want to clearance the DVR-220s out first. They do however sell both at the walk in stores.


The DVR-533H that I was referring to is sold at onecall for $359, Walmart doesn't sell this model.


Onecall's 533 is the same total price as Walmart's 531 model based on a Walmart purchase of 6% sales tax and a onecall purchase with no sales tax or shipping costs. Since I don't need or plan to use a DV input, it's a better value for me to go with the Walmart model. The exchange/return deadline is much longer and there are no restocking fees if Walmart can't or won't find a defect or if I find a design problem with it that I'm not comfortable with. With Walmart you pay for the convenience of walking out with it when you buy it, and the better return policy. With onecall, you give up convenience and a better return policy to have the DV input.


It's simple, base your purchasing vendor upon your needs and you'll be a winner.


Have a good one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Up
Just record using your Camcorder's S-Video output to the DVD Recorder's S-Video input. Many have said this is the preferred method as you can get the correct black level and custom picture adjustments this way.


DV has a black level of 0 IRE and will record as such unless you can change the DV output to the standard 7.5 IRE level. If you can't, you'll have washed out pictures. Also, you can't use any picture adjustments on the DV input so what you have is what you'll have to record with. Don't think this is the highest performance either, the DV signal still has to be encoded to MPEG2 just like your analog signal. Also, I don't know about this recorder, but some recorders create new chapters when a change in contrast is detected and when the camcorder was put in pause. This was a frustration of others last year in the posts.


So many found the ideal way of recording camcorder videos was through the S-Video. Maybe some will disagree or agree and chime in.


BTW, Onecall.com is selling the DVR-533H for $369 which comes out to be the same as Walmarts price since no shipping or tax is charged from onecall. However you have to give a signature to receive and for me, this is a major pain as my UPS shippers won't deliver when I'm home, or even schedule a drop off when I'm home. That's why I try to avoid online shopping when possible. Besides, I bought with my Visa and that doubles the manufacturers warranty to 2 years PLUS Walmart has a 90 day return policy if something is wrong with it. I really like that as I've used that 90 days quite a bit.


So it's up to you whether you want the DV input, or the better return policy and ease of buying.


Onecall's return policy is definitely not the best as seen here ,



So if they can't or won't find your problem, you'll pay ~$54 to return it. That says nothing about design bugs so you'll likely pay the $54 if your not happy with it's design. With Walmart, you have 90 days to use all of the recorders functions to make sure they are all properly operating without defects or design bugs.


Have a good one.
Mike, while it's true that the DV input recordings are brighter than from S-Video, the results are more realistic to my eye. When I connect my Sony camcorder to my Sony TV with DV input, the results are too dark for my tastes. So this is definitely a case of YMMV. The good part about not needing the analog circuitry for S-Video is also eliminating the noise that it would introduce. My DV input copies are as clean as the originals, to my eye. So far, these are the best recordings I've make on the 533HS from any source. The only difference I see is just an ever so slight softening of the image, but it's hardly noticeable even on a 60" TV. The S-Video copies are not as good.


If someone has a camcorder with DV out, I recommend they buy a DVR with DV input, and decide for themselves if they prefer S-Video recordings. In my case, it would have been a mistake not to have a DV input on the DVR.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwain
Thanks Again for all the info mike up and like always ...Thanks for your time !


Dwain
No problem.;)


Have a good one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Up
DV has a black level of 0 IRE and will record as such unless you can change the DV output to the standard 7.5 IRE level. If you can't, you'll have washed out pictures.
I had that backwards, the picture will record to dark at the 0 IRE setting instead of the 7.5 IRE standard.


From my readings, the S-Video output of the same DV camcorder will also output a 0 IRE, but some camcorders allow the S-video output to be changed to the standard 7.5 IRE, for proper watching and recording.


Even if the camcorder doesn't allow the S-Video IRE to be changed to 7.5 IRE, the Pioneer can correct that by using the Pioneer's input black level setting of 0 IRE, instead of the default standard 7.5 IRE. This is for the input, not playback, as it will permanently record the video at the correct IRE level.


Sony TVs most likely take into account the black level shift for the DV input and why the quality most likely is better. Since the S-Video output may have the IRE level option, the darker quality of the S-Video was most likely because the IRE was set to 0 IRE for that S-Video output.


It surely doesn't hurt to try both ways of recording, but sometimes you have to make a hard choice and you may have to decide on not having that feature.


Good luck in whatever you decide and have a good one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by probepro
Mike, while it's true that the DVI recordings are brighter than from S-Video, the results are more realistic to my eye. When I connect my Sony camcorder to my Sony TV with DV input, the results are too dark for my tastes. So this is definitely a case of YMMV. The good part about not needing the analog circuitry for S-Video is also eliminating the noise that it would introduce. My DVI copies are as clean as the originals, to my eye. The only difference I see is just an ever so slight softening of the image, but it's hardly noticeable even on a 60" TV. The S-Video copies are not as good.


If someone has a camcorder with DV out, I recommend they buy a DVR with DVI, and decide for themselves if they prefer S-Video recordings. In my case, it would have been a mistake not to get DVI.
BTW, I'm talking about the DV input/output(firewire), not DVI.


Have a good one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Up
The DVR-533H that I was referring to is sold at onecall for $359, Walmart doesn't sell this model.


Onecall's 533 is the same total price as Walmart's 531 model ........
OneCall's price is $399, not $359!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Ontario
OneCall's price is $399, not $359!
10% off when added to the cart = 359


but they are out of stock now
 

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As a forum lurker last year, I was very close to buying the 520, but the black-out bug and macro-blcking issue scared me off, especially because I have a lot of old sporting events on VHS to convert. It sounds like the 533 is a very worthy successor and I'm glad I waited. Just for clarification, the 531 and 533 are the same machine, but the 533 has the DV input? And the 633, just has bigger HD? Do any of the major B & M stores have the 533 in? (BB, CC, Tweeter, etc?) I'd like to see it first.
 
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