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I am planning to buy a receiver.


Initially I thinking of buying a Yamaha HTR 5560, then Yamaha 1400, but now a Pioneer 912K. Specially that's within my price range and it has all the features I am looking for in the Yamaha 1400. What do you think about my final decision?


Where can I find a good/but not very expensive (under 130) Sub. I bought speakers from Fluance (AV-HTB).


And still I don't have a DVD player (now I use my PS2 to watch movies), any good players (for under US$130)
 

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Well the 912 is a lot less than the Yamaha from a authorized dealer and has similar features so not a bad choice especially if you need/want to spend less money. For a DVD player spend a little more (~$170) to get the Pioneer 563A (I think that is the right number), not quite the level of a Panny XP30 or Denon 1600 but not too far off either and less plus has DVD-A and SACD to boot.


Edit: Oops forgot to give the sub question an answer. For that little money I would look into one from Parts Express (Dayton) or used to get any decent sound. I have heard good things about this one for the money.
 

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I just picked up a 912 a few weeks ago, and am very pleased with it. It has plenty of power for my awkward shaped room (450 sqft. and 20' ceilings). The MCACC is very convenient, and actually works great. I'm using a Pioneer 563a for DVD's, cd's, dvda and sacd (around $150 or so online) and a Sony WM500 subwoofer stuffed with polyfill ($130 online). I've also heard excellent things about the Dayton sub that Grasschopper mentioned. This setup serves my needs perfectly at a great price. One of the reviews that helped me decide on the 912 was from the website homecinemachoice.com. Click on "hardware reviews" and search for the 912.


How do you like the Fluance AV?
 

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If you are looking for a powerhouse amp to blow your windows out, the 912K isn't it, but for normal use it's fine. My 912K is great for music and I have a pair of the Dayton 10" powered subwoofers as well. I probably could gotten just one Dayton since the MCAAC had me turn them down to half volume.


The 912K has a long list of setting and tweaks than can keep you playing for weeks if you want to. I'm still dialing it in with my hodge-podge of Polk Audio speakers, but so far no problems. Using the AVIA test disc I found my speakers could be a lot better.


The sound of the 912K is much more pleasant to listen to than my 10-year old Yamaha which I found to be more harsh sounding. I like the new Yamahas, but I think I would want to listen to one before I bought it. I bought the 912K because it seemed to have the most features for the money.


I played Greatful Dead American Beauty and the Doors LA Woman on DVD-Audio last night at modest volumes and it sounded great. The mix on LA Woman really takes good advantage of the surround sound capabilities.
 

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Funny you should ask....


...because Cnet just today posted their review of the RXV-1400....

http://reviews.cnet.com/Yamaha_RX_V1...?tag=cnetfd.sd


The Pioneer doesn't have the active speaker frequency response equalization, the on-screen displays, nor the component-video upconversion.


Yes, The Pioneer is cheaper, and seems to be a good value at the price.


I bought the Yamaha, primarily for the 3 features listed above.
 

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If the extra money isn't a problem I would definitely go with the RX-V1400. The Pioneer weighs in at a little over 20 lbs whereas the Yamaha weighs in at over 34 lbs.


The Yamaha has a boatload of extra features as compared to the Pioneer including the following:


1) On screen display

2) Component Video Upconversion

3) HD Component switching @ 60 Mhz (Pioneer is between 28 Mhz and 40)

4) 8 digital inputs (3 coaxial and 5 optical) Pioneer only has 5

5) DPLIIx

6) 7 channels of amplification vs 6 on the Pioneer

7) Yamaha proprietary DSP modes (at least a few of which are excellent)

8) THX Certification and Post Processing

9) Zone 2 and Zone 3 audio

10) Assignable Inputs and Outputs

11) Custom labels for inputs

12) Adjustable Crossover - 9 points 40,60,80,90,100,110,120,160,200 (fixed 100 Hz for Pioneer)

13) Presence Channels (used for front height effects)

14) Silent Cinema (headphone DSP that simulates 5.1)

15) YPAO (significantly better than the MCACC on the 912k) and in the opinion of most users better than MCACC offered on the Pioneer Elite models.


There are many others but those are just the advantages that come to mind.


In terms of sound quality there is no comparison, in 2 channel stereo the level of detail provided by the Yamaha can't be rivaled by the 912K and as far as HT goes that's where the Yamaha clearly excels, particularly with DTS you will hear ambient effects with the Yamaha that you otherwise wouldn't hear.


As far as the CNET review posted above there is a much better review of the RX-V2400 (which is essentially the same as the RX-V1400 with a few more bells and whistles and 10 extra wpc) at audioholics.com


I hope that helps.


Don't get me wrong, the Pioneer 912k is a great budget receiver that you can probably buy for about $300 US vs at least $550 for the Yamaha. Nevertheless, the features and sound quality offered on the Yamaha are a raging bargain for between $550 and $600 US.
 

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A couple of minor things in defense of the 912:


3) "(Pioneer is between 28 Mhz and 40)"

Spec state 5 Hz to 40MHz


7) "Yamaha proprietary DSP modes (at least a few of which are excellent)"

912K has 7 (at least a few of which are excellent)


10) Assignable Inputs and Outputs

The 912 allow assignment of 2 component inputs and 2 coax digital inputs and 2 optical digital inputs


12) "(fixed 100 Hz for Pioneer)"

The Pioneer 912K crossover is adjustable to 100, 150 and 200 Hz


14) "Silent Cinema (headphone DSP that simulates 5.1)"

The 912 has simulated surround for headphones calles PHONES SURROUND, but it won't work for 96kHz PCM or DTS 96kHz/24 bit sources.


The Yamaha allows 4 Ohm speakers while the Pioneer is for 8 Ohm speakers.


The Yamaha looks like it has excellent features for $550 though! I would choose the Yamaha if it is in the budget range.
 

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etronics.com has it for about $550.


Poncho, as far as your comments above I have a few responses:


1) For component video bandwidth I was referring to the upper limit of the Pioneer being between 28 Mhz and 40 Mhz, Pioneer does not state clearly what the bandwidth is, I realize that ultimately it is between 5 Mhz and the upper limit as it is on all receivers.


2) Yamaha proprietary DSPs are known to be the best in the business. Pioneer DSP modes even on the Elite line can't touch those on the Yamaha (any Yamaha for that matter). Even Pioneer fans will admit this, they may and usually do question the usefulness of DSP modes as did I before actually buying my Yamaha.


3) As far as the crossover on the Pio 912k my mistake. However, unless your using a small sub/sat system the crossover points beyond 100 Hz are even more useless, it would be nice to see some crossover points below 100 Hz (90,80,60,40).


I do agree that for $300 the 912k is an excellent value. But if the budget allows for it the Yamaha RX-V1400 is an even better one.
 

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EVT, I agree.

Pioneer component bandwidth limits are in the owner's manual and 40MHz is tops and 20 MHz for TV/SAT.

The Pioneer DSP modes appear to only change the level and tone settings. There is nothing like the Yamaha "Jazz club" "concert theater" etc. modes. I assume the Yamaha also changes EQ and adds echo effects.

I agree, a few settings below 100 Hz would be useful.


When I bought my 912 I don't think the 1400 was out yet and at the time it had the most features/$. I just wanted a reasonable priced multi-channel unit to get me started and I found the $300 price point had an excellent WAF*.



*Wife Acceptance Factor

If I was single I'd be spending much much more!
 

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Hi,


I've got a question about the review at audioholics.com

It says that the YPAO checks if the speakers are out of fase and that it's sometimes wrong. De writer says that you should check the wires to be sure and use an Avia disc to confirm the proper fase.

But... if you've checked the wires, what could possibly be wrong resulting in the speakers being out of phase?

To be honest... I'm not even really sure what it means! Can someone please tell me!?
 
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