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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


I may be purchasing a Pioneer DVR-560H-K soon, and according to it's specsheet the unit can play "DivX compressed movie files" , but makes no mention of the other popular .avi format "Xvid". I'd like copy Xvid files from USB to the HDD.


Can anyone confirm xvid playback is supported?
 

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I have successfully imported Divx/MP3 AVI file into my 660.


Can you provide me a link to a XVID file to test? Preferably a small file.



Be happy to try it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by northrk /forum/post/15478001


I have successfully imported Divx/MP3 AVI file into my 660.


Can you provide me a link to a XVID file to test? Preferably a small file.



Be happy to try it.

I've sent you a PM.


I really appreciate the offer to help.


Quote:
Originally Posted by plplplpl /forum/post/15478193


If it plays DivX, it'll play XviD.

That's what i figured at first, but 100% confirmation would be nice.
 

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Your Xdiv file played on the 660 fine. The audio sync was slightly out of sync. Hardly noticeable.


To me, the video quality was very good on my old Mitsu 55" WS CRT. Letterboxed, of course.


I used a 60gb usb drive to transfer it to the HDD.


Note that if your USB drive has alot of files on it, it may take a little time for the DVDR to recognize it, so don't freak out if the "copy from USB device" option is not available right away. Wait for the usb drive light to stabilize.


Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by northrk /forum/post/15496855


Your Xdiv file played on the 660 fine. The audio sync was slightly out of sync. Hardly noticeable.


To me, the video quality was very good on my old Mitsu 55" WS CRT. Letterboxed, of course.


I used a 60gb usb drive to transfer it to the HDD.


Note that if your USB drive has alot of files on it, it may take a little time for the DVDR to recognize it, so don't freak out if the "copy from USB device" option is not available right away. Wait for the usb drive light to stabilize.


Hope this helps.

I took another look at the xvid file and it seems to be slightly out of sync on my PC as well. Strange. Anyways good info and thanks again. I'll think ill be grabbing the 560 in a couple of days.
 

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Hi everyone.


I have purchased the 560H, and am really frustrated. It only plays about half of my "avi" files. Some play perfectly, others are black and white and scroll horizontally really fast.


I've tried every possible file conversion program and burning program I've been able to find on the net, and not one of them has been able to covert the problem avi files to something that will play on this machine.


I would be VERY grateful if anyone there could provide some assistance.


With thanks, in advance,


zttztt
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zttztt /forum/post/16348192


Hi everyone.


I have purchased the 560H, and am really frustrated. It only plays about half of my "avi" files. Some play perfectly, others are black and white and scroll horizontally really fast.


I've tried every possible file conversion program and burning program I've been able to find on the net, and not one of them has been able to covert the problem avi files to something that will play on this machine.


I would be VERY grateful if anyone there could provide some assistance.


With thanks, in advance,


zttztt

The files you are trying to play are probably in PAL format (25 fps) rather than NTSC (29.97/30 fps). The North American Pioneers do not handle PAL properly.


I've had reasonable luck using the free FAVC software package (favcfavc.googlepages.com) to convert PAL AVI files to NTSC DVD disc images, which I then burn to DVD+R/W discs on my PC using ImgBurn ( www.imgburn.com ). Although the process is time-consuming and the resulting MPEG-2 files are bigger than the original AVIs, the resulting disc can be played on my Pioneer DVD recorder and Sony Blu-ray player without problems.


Tony
 

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Do NOT, under any circumstances, buy any brand of DVD/HDD recorder if your primary goal is to load its hard drive with computer video files and use it as a DiVX/Xvid jukebox. You will be bitterly, bitterly disappointed. This used to be clearly understood by most buyers until a year or so ago, when folks suddenly got it into their head that DVD/HDD recorders would "of course" be perfect for this. Well, no, they aren't: the stupid DiVX/Xvid/pc file trading flavor of the month formats change constantly and a lot of stuff circulates in PAL, which DVD/HDD recorders cannot play unless connected to a PAL capable television or converter box. You want to play heavily with DiVX or Xvid or AVI, connect your PC to your television: you'll avoid a lot of tedious intermediate converting and file transfers and aggravation. Or buy a cheap dedicated DVD player that claims to be fully-compatible with DiVX/Xvid: many players are equipped with PAL>NTSC conversion circuits that are NEVER included in the much more expensive DVD/HDD machines.


If MOST of your files are playing B/W and scrolling too quickly to see, you have a hell of a lot of file converting ahead of you to make them compatible with your DVD/HDD recorder. Personally I wouldn't bother, there are better things you can do with your time. If you insist on loading them to your recorder hard drive, the simplest solution is to buy a PAL>NTSC converter box to connect between your recorder and your TV: it will unscramble the files and make them playable without you having to change them in the PC beforehand. This is an extra expense, to be sure, but what is your time worth? If you have 50 or 100 or more of these "problem" Xvids, you could be looking at a LOT of file conversion time on the PC. Go with the outboard box that converts on the fly as you watch the TV.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear /forum/post/16350040


This used to be clearly understood by most buyers until a year or so ago, when folks suddenly got it into their head that DVD/HDD recorders would "of course" be perfect for this.

There's a totally different paradigm between computers and most consumer electronics devices. Computers are programmable and are designed to be flexible, general-purpose machines. They can be loaded with new software to process lots of different file formats, and they have tons of memory and processing power which allows room for lots of varied programs which are full of code to handle scores of media formats and all kinds of unusual situations.


Consumer electronic devices (like DVD recorders and players) are almost the exact opposite - they're built using the absolute minimum processing power and memory required to play predefined standard formats and they won't recognize anything that the marketing department didn't specifically tell the designers to include. Once the machine has been manufactured that's it, any changes to disc formats after that are completely beyond it's capabilities.


This is why pressed DVDs and DVD-R discs are the "gold standard" of compatibility - they adhere to a simple file format that's been laid down and implemented by every player manufactured for almost a decade. Go anywhere beyond that and you're treading on thin ice with consumer players.


Blu-ray players are a little bit of a hybrid - it seems that most of them so far have extra power and memory and have been designed to accept firmware upgrades. Part of this has to do with the fact that the Blu-ray standard was still in flux when a lot of these machines were designed, and part of it has to do with increasing expectations of a generation of computer-savvy buyers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear /forum/post/16350040


Do NOT, under any circumstances, buy any brand of DVD/HDD recorder if your primary goal is to load its hard drive with computer video files and use it as a DiVX/Xvid jukebox. You will be bitterly, bitterly disappointed. This used to be clearly understood by most buyers until a year or so ago, when folks suddenly got it into their head that DVD/HDD recorders would "of course" be perfect for this. Well, no, they aren't: the stupid DiVX/Xvid/pc file trading flavor of the month formats change constantly and a lot of stuff circulates in PAL, which DVD/HDD recorders cannot play unless connected to a PAL capable television or converter box. You want to play heavily with DiVX or Xvid or AVI, connect your PC to your television: you'll avoid a lot of tedious intermediate converting and file transfers and aggravation. Or buy a cheap dedicated DVD player that claims to be fully-compatible with DiVX/Xvid: many players are equipped with PAL>NTSC conversion circuits that are NEVER included in the much more expensive DVD/HDD machines.


If MOST of your files are playing B/W and scrolling too quickly to see, you have a hell of a lot of file converting ahead of you to make them compatible with your DVD/HDD recorder. Personally I wouldn't bother, there are better things you can do with your time. If you insist on loading them to your recorder hard drive, the simplest solution is to buy a PAL>NTSC converter box to connect between your recorder and your TV: it will unscramble the files and make them playable without you having to change them in the PC beforehand. This is an extra expense, to be sure, but what is your time worth? If you have 50 or 100 or more of these "problem" Xvids, you could be looking at a LOT of file conversion time on the PC. Go with the outboard box that converts on the fly as you watch the TV.

I hear you. Thanks.
 

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I own a Pioneer DVR 560-H and have it hooked up to my Avid Editing System via RCA and S-video cables. Basically, I play my edited videos in realtime and record them to the HDD of the Pioneer DVR. This works unbelievably great, save for one aspect - my video is recorded in 4:3. Does anyone know if there is a setting in which I can automatically record to DVD or HDD with a letterbox? I've tried both the 16:9 and 4:3 Letterboxed options in the "Playback" settings. If I can figure this one snag out, it will save me hundreds of hours of render time in Avid.


Many thanks!


P.S. I used to have an old Sony DVR that would do this automatically. I would just set my tv setting on the DVR as 4:3 letterboxed. I don't see this option on the Pioneer.
 

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All DVDRs record in 4x3. They record the signal the source sends them. To record an anamorphic picture, which is 16x9 squeezed into 4x3, your source must be able to provide the squeezed signal for your Pio DVDR to record. You will then probably have to manually select "Wide" on your display to unsqueeze the picture.
 
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