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This has been discussed in other threads but I decided to start a new one with this title to make it easier for others to find this information with a simple title search.


I own a PRO1000HD and I could not find any documentation with respect to Pioneer's dead pixel policy. So I sent a letter to Amy Friend (Public Relations) at Pioneer a few months ago and didn't receive a response. I then called her directly (310-952-2000) and she was kind enough to direct me to Rocky Clarke in customer service (800-872-4159 or [email protected] ). Rocky sent me the manual for the 5030HD model where it stipulates the following on page E2:


"On a total of nearly 3 million light cells, more than 99.999 percent

of the cells remain active."


Doing some simple math, this would translate to about 26 to 30 dead pixels. Rocky states that this is deemed acceptable by Pioneer. He also states that this policy applies to all Pioneer consumer plasma displays (including the PRO1000HD).


That is the sum of my discussions with Pioneer.


Now moving on to my own experiences with this sort of issue; in my informal discussions with a couple of manufacturers, although they echo similar sentiments, they usually take each incident on a case by case basis. What this means is they will take into account the location of the dead pixels and the size of the cluster. So if you had say 5 bad pixels that were in the center of the display all bunched together, they would most likely consider replacing the display. But if they were dispersed on the fringe border areas, they probably would not.


Personally, even if they were along the most extreme edge of the display, I would not tolerate 26 bad pixels and I would find it hard to believe that Pioneer would enforce that policy in a situation like that.


You can find much more detailed dead pixel policies for laptop LCD displays from companies like Toshiba which spell out in detail things like proximity to each other and relative to the display. But it seems that plasma displays don't enjoy that same level of detail so if you find yourself in a situation with an unwatchable display due to dead pixels, you simply need to work constructively with the manufacturer and hope for the best.


Also keep in mind that as early adopters, we sometimes don't get to enjoy the benefits of improved manufacturing processes. As this technology matures, this issue should become less and less prevalent.


Hope this clears up some things. Not the best news but at least we all know a little more about the issue from an official source.
 

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It may not be quite as bad as it looks.


When they refer to '3,000,000' cells, they are talking about sub-pixels.


3 sub-pixels = 1 pixel


So in the worst case, 10 completely dead (black) pixels would exceed their tolerance.


I would bet that even on screens that people believe are perfect, there may be a few sub-pixels scattered around that are not working.


Only way to spot them easily is to display a pure color mask of red/green/blue in turn and look for any dead sub-pixels, then use a black mask to spot stuck sub-pixels, very hard to spot them just by watching normal material which is a good thing of course.


If you are happy with your screen, don't even think about doing this though as if you do discover a problem human nature is such that you'll focus on it and start to look for it :)


Mark
 

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My own experience of dead pixels is pretty encouraging:


- Panny 42" - None

- Toshiba Laptop LCD 1400 * 1050 - None

- IBM 17 inch LCD 1280 * 1024 - One

- Eizo 20 inch LCD 1600 * 1200 - One
 
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