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I use a 120 mm Yate-Loon L-series from Nexfan for $4+shipping running at 12v or 28dba into a 120->80 mm fan adapter for $5 into my HD1000u air intake port on the R side of the lens (air exhaust is on L side of lens). There are air intake ports on the L and R side panels near the back also. I was able to reduce the exhaust temp. at the grill of HD1000u on low lamp mode from 145'F to 110'F. Not sure if this helps my bulb life but it certainly makes me feel better. I just flip the toggle switch on an AC plug from Home Depot and plug in my Wallyworld 12v AC/DC adapter to turn on the fan and then turn on the HD1000u. I reverse the steps when I'm done.


Some are worry about rapid cooling but fan cooling is not that rapid. Bulb is designed to be cooled with fans at room temperature. I'm just making the air intake more efficient and allow the HD1000u's fan to be more efficient. Heat damages bulb and electronics so I feel this should help. This is especially important for LCD PJ with organic panels (blue polarizer burns sound familiar?)


The Optoma H79 folks have been using this method for 3 years to prevent their premature bulb deaths successfully.


Ceiling mount PJ can affix the fan using clear fishing lines while table/shelf mount PJ is self-explanatory.
 

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Too lazy to take photos but here are the parts:

http://nexfan03.stores.yahoo.net/sil...-d12sl-12.html


http://nexfan03.stores.yahoo.net/80to12fanad.html


http://www.trustyelectronics.com/cat...oducts_id=3483


You splice the red wire on the fan to the positive of the AC/DC adapter (the black wire with white stripe on it). You splice the black wire to the negative wire of the AC/DC adapter (non-striped black wire next to the + wire). Wrap each with black electrical tape. Cut off the other wires at the fan's hub and off the PC plugs as you don't need them.


Screw your 120 mm fan on to the 120-80 mm fan adapter (can spray paint black if you want it black). Tie the fan to the projector air intake port with clear 15# or stronger fishing line by lacing the line through each of the fan's 2 screw holes on the left side of the fan and tie the end of the string around the PJ. Do the same for the right side of the fan.


Plug the AC/DC 12v adapter (if you like less noise you can use 9v AC/DC adapter but it won't lower your temp. like the 12v mode due to less RPM, less noise, and less CFM air movement) into the same surge protecting powerstrip of your PJ. This way when you turn on your PJ by the rocker switch on the powerstrip, it will also turn on the fan (of course you will have to turn the PJ on with your remote control also as merely applying AC power to the PJ just put it on standby and does not activate your PJ's bulb). Some people use the auto-sensing powerstrip to automatically trigger the fan on but it's $30 and I'm too cheap



Don't use the PJ's 12v trigger as it's not enough amperage to power the fan and may damage your PJ.


You can buy more expensive and more efficient (more CFM for same or less noise level) fans for this project.
 

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That is Project Gotham Racing 3. It is about 50/50 sim arcade. Forza motorsport 2 is coming soon which is 100% sim and would rock with this set up. I'm building one! Oh wait ya I'm married.... Oh well I can dream!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey /forum/post/0


Too lazy to take photos but here are the parts:


Don't use the PJ's 12v trigger as it's not enough amperage to power the fan and may damage your PJ.


You can buy more expensive and more efficient (more CFM for same or less noise level) fans for this project.

That fan is spec'ed at 1.8W. At 12V this is 1.8W/12V = 150mA. Isn't the trigger on the HD1000 rated for 250mA. It seems like this would work. The trigger current rating is in the manual.


-Mike
 

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If your projector comes with a 12VDC trigger circuit and you wish to use it with a higher voltage or higher draw fan just get a 12V relay and use that to step up the output to the fan. Doing this you could even get a 120VAC fan or two and have them come on when the projector fires up and go off when you shut down off the trigger.


There is a wide assortment of 120V pancake fans and they are very quiet.
 

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Sorry I don't like PM, never did. If you can't say it here then I don't need or want to here it. Thanks.


The problem of AC fans is that they may introduce more electrical interferece where as these DC fans are designed for PC so less interference. AC fans also tend to be noisier for the same CFM and more expensive.
 

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Quote:
The problem of AC fans is that they may introduce more electrical interferece where as these DC fans are designed for PC so less interference. AC fans also tend to be noisier for the same CFM and more expensive.

these assertions are false except sometimes the expence....

 

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IMO AC vs DC is a null point when it comes to noise, interference, and cost. I'm sure a case could be made in both directions but I wont go into that.


My only point was that using the trigger circuit if unused would be a very convenient way to automate the whole external fan deal.


I have read reports on bulb life with increased cooling and once again IMO there is merit in doing this. We would all hope the projector manufacture would have designed in sufficient cooling to take the bulb life to the point of diminishing returns and in most cases I'm sure they have. The real way these fans should help most is in the case of user induced heat issues and environmental issues. They certainly can't hurt.


I have often felt the outside of the case after the projector has been on several hours and there is some heat build up in the case and around the unit. People at altitude or that have their projectors on book shelves or enclosed spaces at all should think about this. I don't have a trigger circuit on my projector so I'll most likely go manual or maybe a temp switch located next to the exhaust side of the projector.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bud16415 /forum/post/0


I have read reports on bulb life with increased cooling and once again IMO there is merit in doing this. We would all hope the projector manufacture would have designed in sufficient cooling to take the bulb life to the point of diminishing returns and in most cases I'm sure they have. The real way these fans should help most is in the case of user induced heat issues and environmental issues. They certainly can't hurt.

Not if they are hoping to do the same thing as printer makers are doing with cartridges or console makers with games


/shrug


1 bulb every 1.5-2 years though isn't a big deal to me though
 

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Ok AC fan gurus: link me an AC fan with same specs as my 120 mm Yate-Loons L series:


$4/fan, 47 CFM, 28 dba, 1.8 watt


Prove me wrong folks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey /forum/post/0


Ok AC fan gurus: link me an AC fan with same specs as my 120 mm Yate-Loons L series:


$4/fan, 47 CFM, 28 dba, 1.8 watt


Prove me wrong folks

I would PM you the link , But I didn't know if that would be a good idea.



If you are spending between $1000 and $10,000 on a projector and are wishing to safeguard it from premature heat failure. Why would you care if the fan cost $4 or $40 being AC why would you care about current draw in this application.


CFM, noise, and life are about the main factors we need to look at.



Ok did a google search and this is the first one that popped up.


http://pelonis.thomasnet.com/item/ac...-l--7?&seo=110


120VAC , 45-66 CFM , 28.8 dBA , 60 mAMP , ball bearing , 50,000 hr life


Don't know the cost but have used many similar to this at work on all type of machine tool controls etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcd /forum/post/0


So these AC fan's cord just plug right into the projector 12VAC trigger? These pics on the website didn't provided big enough of a pic so I can't tell if the plug will fit or not.

No don't plug into the trigger circuit.



With an AC fan you need AC to power it. What you could do with such a fan would be put some lamp cord and a plug on it and plug it into a wall outlet. With a DC fan you wire it to a small transformer and plug that in. the trigger was first mentioned as a power source for a DC fan and the trigger circuit may or may not be able to carry the current required. That's when I suggested a AC fan and wire a relay into the trigger circuit. The relay could then control the fan and the trigger could control the relay. All this is in an attempt to make it automatic, when you turn the projector on the fan starts etc. A better method might be a thermal switch in both cases it would just turn the fan AC or DC when the temp around the projector reaches some set point.


None of this is plug n play and shouldn't be attempted unless you have a good understanding of electricity and circuits. It requires making terminations of wires with AC voltage.
 
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