AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a Panasonic 42" high definition set for our master bedroom. Prior to that I had a special ceiling lift designed where the screen pivots down from the ceiling past 90 degrees to about 110 degrees to allow viewing from our bed.


Of course, this means that when the lift is closed, the unit is on its back recessed in the ceiling.


Well, I am now being told that the plasma set can not be stored like this and that I will damage the screen...and further, that having the unit pivot down will damage the unit.


Two questions:


1. Is this a "real" concern or only a theoretical one? In other words, do I really need to worry about this?


and


2. If it is real, what can I do now?????


I would really appreciate some help here.


Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
I think its a real concern,plasmas can't lay on their backs or their fronts for an extended peroid of time.It puts too much stress on the glass.They weren't designed for an application like that.Thats why they're shipped upright strapped to a pallet.Loose the ceiling mount and mount the panny to the wall.The wife might not be happy at first but its your best choice.bm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Batman.


Only problem with the obvious solution of abandoning the mount is that there is not wall space opposite the bed. Its cabinets...which is why we had to use a ceiling mount.


I guess we could keep the unit in its open position, most of the time, but the wife and decorator will jail me!


What is an "extended" period of time in your understanding??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
More then 20 minutes.The screen was not designed to absorb this kind of stress.I also think the open and closing will put way too much stress on the screen.Everyday up and down.....no way.It cant handle it. The only other suggestion I have is to return the plasma(no) or move it to another room(yes) and enjoy it for years to come.bm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Batman,


Is the concern electronic or physical? Is it that the glass might crack from the stress?


If I could ge the unit to be at a 45 degree angle while in the up position, would that help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
Its the glass thats the problem.Its very delicate and can only take minimum stress.Your problem sounds like an accident waiting to happen. bm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Actually, IMHO, it may be more strain on all the itty bitty electrodes that are sandwiched in the glass, than the glass itself, at least that's what I would worry about.


RSquared - is there any way to modify the mount to maintain a vertical position up in the ceiling? This obviously may take up more height than you have room for. But if there is room I would be thinking about a spring controlled articulated system. (Think of a standard Plasma articulated mount turned on it's side (90 degrees) with springs attached like a drop down attic stairway.


Otherwise you may have to replace with a simple vertical lift (could be of the scissors type variety).

Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
We put these things on business jets and they handle the environment just fine. No special mods for the perceived problem above. There are "invisible" supports within the plasma (100 microns distance between front and rear glass).


The real problem is shipping them flat. That is why we only ship on a pallet which forces the shipment to be vertical so it does not get "dropped" in the horizontal plane and really stress the glass(s).

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Babula,


Are you saying I needn't worry about this under my circumstances????


If so, you've made me very happy!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
The glass pane will probably not break on its own without a sizeable shock. A simple example would be a framed print under glass. Shake it while holding it horizontally, the main risk will be the frame coming apart from the weight it was not designed to take in that position, the glass won't crack unless it was deeply scratched like with a glass cutter. Thus your main concern (electronics aside, don't know about their behaviour in such a position) will be how well fastened the bezel is which holds in the glass pane, after all, you'll be lying under it. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
RSquared,


I can guarantee nothing, but If I had the described installation, I would not worry about it, unless there is potential for "shock" in the movement path. We have put these things on the a test jig to check "rapid deceleration" (uses a centifuge type device driven by an old v8 chevy engine). Most products that are certified for a/c use must go through these tests. This test proves that the insides of the plasma will not break the safety glass and come flying through th cabin.


We do 9g in horizontal, 12 in vertical etc. These Panasonic plasmas are really tough. But if you ship it in a horizonal position and it is suddenly dropped flat on the side, watch out!


Because of the glass size, the FAA has issued a special test requirement that tests the "load" capabilities of the safety glass. The unit is layed flat on a fixture and five spots are marked in as many positions on the glass. Then a forklift slowly lowers a 300 pound weight (cylinder) onto each position and it stays there for 15 seconds each. Another special test involves standing the display vertically and using a tethered steel ball, it is dropped and swings into the safety glass and the glass must not break in either case.


The rest of the tests are environmental hot/cold, EMI, etc. I just ordered the new HD 42" and expect it next week. I am so very impressed with the Panasonic. Of course, it is very smart of them to perhaps not intentionally build a unit that will withstand this abuse, but put the care into it that allows these tests to be passed. They really don't have to worry about supporting the warranty etc as they are made so well.


By the way, the picture quality is not too shoddy either.

Bill

It is amzing to see this thing go round and round and then suddenly stop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,301 Posts
Whoa- That's truely impressive - Thanks for that feedback Babula.


Have you been involved with similar test for other manufactures units and how did they fair?


Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Bruce,

No, we have not been involved with other makers products. There are a couple of other companies in the market, but I don't know what brand they start with.


The biggest thing that must be overcome is that the FAA wants to impose very tight control over the source vendor's product that we use and Panasonic can't be bothered and I don't blame them. The sales are not that great from their perspective. Configuration control, producability, traceability and et al to ensure that the product you sell after certification by them is the same you sell for any other sales.


You might imagine that the product that is sold to the owner of and airplane whether private or an airline is very pricey based upon the non-recurring engineering and tests.


Bill
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,492 Posts
Bill


very interesting



could you describe EMI tests- is it radiated and susceptibility?


Mil Std 461? these things must radiate like crazy


Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Mark,

EMI tests indicate only area of concern is Radiated Emissions in the HF range (2 - 30 Mhz). The plasma does not pass the test directly from the factory. Our ability to resolve that situation gives us a competitive edge, so I can't address that. Testing is as per RTCA DO160D spec as a point of interest.


By the way, the so called industrial grade Panasonics for 2001 are FCC Class A whilst the consumer grade is Class B. B is better for not radiating stuff. I guess no one cares about the industrial area. Also it is less expensive.


Bill
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top