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I just purchased a Panny 42PHD5. Is there a period of time that the display takes to "break-in'"?
 

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Yes If you are going to get it professionally calibrated. They say a few hundred hourd of use. I did my PRO1000 and Fujitsu at around 200hrs.
 

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Hey, didn't mean to be so short with my earlier reply, but where did anyone get the idea that plasmas have a break in period? After you guys posted, I did a google search and couldn't find anything remotely related. Besides, it doesn't make a lot of sense to me, by that logic, you should have it calibrated EVERY 200-400 hours. On a display that is rated for 30,000 hours to half life (half original brightness) there is no way you should be able to detect a difference in 200-400 hours (except maybe with a burn in issue, which is still inconclusive by most accounts.)


Of course, these are mostly opinions based on conjecture, so please share some links with us, we need to know the truth!
 

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Srgilbert:


I believe ISF calibrators recommend a break in period, as per previous comments, but don’t know what the logic is. I recently calibrated mine after about 360 hours and the difference was very impressive. It’s possible the same thing would have been true if I’d done it when new, of course.


There has been discussion of this topic in other threads, but maybe not recently. Searching may turn up something.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by srgilbert
. . . On a display that is rated for 30,000 hours to half life (half original brightness) there is no way you should be able to detect a difference in 200-400 hours . . . . please share some links with us, we need to know the truth!
This would be correct if the phospher wear were linear - that is, if the briteness loss in the beginning is at the same rate as after thousands of hours of use. However, phosphor wear (and its impact on brightness potential of the pixel) decreases in a logorythmic way over time. If you plot it out, the decline curve is pretty steep in the begininning and gets more and more shallow over time. In other words, the first 30,000 hours you describe cuts the brighness in half, the second 30,000 hours cuts it just a little bit more. And the first 1000 hours may account for well over half of the decline in brightness you mention in your 30,000 life-to-half-briteness scenario.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by trainerdave
This would be correct if the phospher wear were linear - that is, if the briteness loss in the beginning is at the same rate as after thousands of hours of use. However, phosphor wear (and its impact on brightness potential of the pixel) decreases in a logorythmic way over time. If you plot it out, the decline curve is pretty steep in the begininning and gets more and more shallow over time. In other words, the first 30,000 hours you describe cuts the brighness in half, the second 30,000 hours cuts it just a little bit more. And the first 1000 hours may account for well over half of the decline in brightness you mention in your 30,000 life-to-half-briteness scenario.
This from the Plasma TV Buying Guide website:
Quote:
Panasonic: States (not publicly) that the monitor is good for 20,000 to 30,000 hours. They also state that these plasma displays measure 50% brightness (phosphor ignition may be a better term) at 50,000 hours.


Dissipation begins the moment you turn the set on. After 1000 hours of usage a plasma monitor should measure around 94% brightness, which is barely noticeable to the naked eye. At 15,000 to 20,000 hours the monitor should measure around 68% brightness or to say it differently, 68% of the phosphors are being ignited.


How do the manufacturers know how to calculate the figures since plasma monitors have not been out long? The manufacturer facilities in Japan test plasma panels at 100% white image light and measure down from that point with meter readings. It takes hours to find that 50% mark - between 30,000 and 50,000 hours. What a job that would be… - to watch the white light.
 

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This is the reason why I am seeing better blacks on my Pro than the first 200-500 hours of use.


David, it seems to me that since the fuji has a dark picture to start with that you will end up with something too dark after say 10000H-20000H of usage.


Whereas our Pioneers start with a very bright picture and gradually converge to a darker one over time. I am definitely seeing better black levels now, that is for sure.


MAB
 

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Its amazing how some things just come full circle. Almost everything stated here I have posted on this forum numerous times, except I have stated a "break-in" period of 300hrs. One more thing to add is don't forget about the "Electronics"- they need a little time to "Age" as well.


Have a good day.


Dave
 
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