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I know this is the gaming forum and not the TV forum, but it seems more appropriate to ask here. Are plasma TVs considered OK for Xbox gaming? Im looking at a 50" 3D Panny plasma and just wanted to know if there are any issues with plasmas that I should take into account. Should I worry about lag or image retention? I respect the intelligence of the board and would be greatful for any input. Thanks.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vedder /forum/post/0


I know this is the gaming forum and not the TV forum, but it seems more appropriate to ask here. Are plasma TVs considered OK for Xbox gaming? Im looking at a 50" 3D Panny plasma and just wanted to know if there are any issues with plasmas that I should take into account. Should I worry about lag or image retention? I respect the intelligence of the board and would be greatful for any input. Thanks.

I game on a Panny 50" G10. It works great. The lag measured in Guitar Hero/Rock Band is very low, and I've had zero concern about that. Image retention happens, but it's not a big deal. I think this set is really great for gaming.
 

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Yes.


Not only is it OK, big screen plasmas dont have the motion problems big screen LCD's do. Plasma is my preferred and recommended choice for big flat screen viewing.
 

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I have a Plasma and Led. Both game good. The Plasma has better color but the Led is a little sharper. I like the Plasma better. Just make sure you break in in the first 100-200 hrs with you contrast and light low. Research that part. But when I game I use game mor and keep my setting 50%. Movies my tv is caliberated and runs higher
 

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Yes, plasma is just fine for console use. As with any new display, after you take it out of the box, take a few minutes to properly adjust the settings. At the most basic, throw in a copy of THX Optimizer that you have sitting on one of the DVDs you already own. With plasma, the most useful thing to pay attention to for the well-being of the display is how bright you set white (contrast). On your contrast test-pattern, just make white as bright as you would ever want the brightest of whites to be. Too bright and it's frankly painful to look at the display, especially in dim environment lighting. For example, Contrast on my 50" Panasonic plasma is set to ~60/100.


As a side note, the lower the contrast and brightness on your plasma, the lower the power draw, and the lower the heat production.
 

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+1 to what IreonMike said. I have a 50" panny g10 and use it for gaming all the time. Very little input lag (almost as low as you can get on a flat screen tv now).


Just use it with contrast and brightness set to about 50 whether watching tv with static images (like scoreboards) or playing games for the first 2 or 3 hundred hours and then set it to whatever you like. I have mine set to about 75 now and see a little image retention now and then, but it's nothing permanent and goes away within a few seconds of viewing different material.
 

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They are fine, and better then LCD in some cases. Don't forget, LCD's are still doing 120 Hz and some are up to 240 Hz now. Why do they do that, because of lag on the screen (on older LCDs you can actually see the lag of like fast moving action) Plasmas are 600 Hz, they have never had this problem and never will.


Newer and better model Plasma sets no longer have image retention problems. I have a last generation Pioneer Kuro, and I have gamed on the TV, the same game, with a bright HUD bar, Red health Bar, Blue mana bar, on the screen all the time in the same spot and I have gamed for 8 hours straight, same game, same bright huds, no image retention. The Pioneer have a pixel shift technology (called the orbiter) that was built specifically to take care of image retention, works, amazing.
 

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Short answer: Yes.


Long answer: Definitely Yes.
 

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Wait! Stop gaming on your plasma immediately! Ignore the noobs who replied to your query. Gaming on plasmas is widely known to cause ED and the condition known as hot dog fingers.


Just kidding. Gaming on plasmas is awesome!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironmike86
Why?
Um, because he's wrong. First of all Plasmas don't behave like LCD's, so comparing a 600hz "sub field drive" (which is just a BS marketing term anyhow) to an LCD panel that has 120hz or 240hz refresh.....is comparing Apples to Fried Shrimp. They are two different technologies.


Gaming on any LCD with 120 or 240hz modes turned on is an instant trip to Frustrationville, not only does the TV try to make pictures where no data exists, but it can cause nasty lag in your control times. You can also get some truly ugly visuals with lots of artifacts from the 120hz or 240hz process.


And plasmas can still get image retention.....orbiter or pixel shifting doesn't solve that problem it just helps to reduce it, but setting your TV up correctly also goes towards that same end.
 

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"Why?"


Exhibit A) "Don't forget, LCD's are still doing 120 Hz and some are up to 240 Hz now. Why do they do that, because of lag on the screen (on older LCDs you can actually see the lag of like fast moving action)"


He is confusing pixel response time with screen refresh time. These are two very different concepts. Screen refresh is simply how many times per second you are trying to update the image on the LCD. Slow pixel response, which causes smearing and ghosting on even the best of LCDs, is a matter of how long it takes for an individual cell to change to it's new color once it has been instructed to shift.


One can have a 240hz refresh rate tied to 50ms response times and end up with a terribly smeared image, and one can also have a 60hz refresh tied to theoretical 2ms response times and end up with a crisp, smooth image in fast motion.


Exhibit B) "Plasmas are 600 Hz, they have never had this problem and never will."


First, 600hz means nothing. Anyone telling you otherwise is lying to you and it is best to discard everything they have to say about any topic that ever comes up.


Secondly, plasma phosphor cells have a decay time, indicated by how long it takes for the cell to stop producing light after it has been charged. If the decay time takes longer than 16ms, which happens in specific cases, you get blur during motion. As an example, play Fallout 3 on any Panasonic plasma. The extremely green nature of the game, combined with Panasonic's delayed green decay time, combined with the human eye's hyper-sensitivity specific to green, create a fairly heavily blurry image. NOTE: I am not saying that Panasonics are bad, I love mine. This one specific game just highlights a specific issue extremely well.



So, the end result is that any flat panel that you pick out is going to blur in specific cases. It's just a matter of whether the blur is before the pixel is lit, or afterward. In most cases, you'll never even notice on modern panels, but sometimes motion will be an issue, just as it was with CRTs, and is with DLP. No display technology is immune.


As I said, ignore that first paragraph of his. It is nothing but poorly informed half-truths. That second paragraph isn't much better, but at least there aren't any outright lies in it. Well, aside from that image retention bit. And the implication that the pixel orbiter is some sort of Pioneer exclusive thing... Okay, it's probably best to ignore that second paragraph as well.
 

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Regularly game on my Pio Elite PRO-151FD. No IR problems or anything else.

-Evangelo2


**My max game time in one session is 2 hours usually so I can speak to no IR or issues in those time frames
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by darklordjames /forum/post/19605621


"Why?"


Exhibit A) "Don't forget, LCD's are still doing 120 Hz and some are up to 240 Hz now. Why do they do that, because of lag on the screen (on older LCDs you can actually see the lag of like fast moving action)"


He is confusing pixel response time with screen refresh time. These are two very different concepts. Screen refresh is simply how many times per second you are trying to update the image on the LCD. Slow pixel response, which causes smearing and ghosting on even the best of LCDs, is a matter of how long it takes for an individual cell to change to it's new color once it has been instructed to shift.


One can have a 240hz refresh rate tied to 50ms response times and end up with a terribly smeared image, and one can also have a 60hz refresh tied to theoretical 2ms response times and end up with a crisp, smooth image in fast motion.


Exhibit B) "Plasmas are 600 Hz, they have never had this problem and never will."


First, 600hz means nothing. Anyone telling you otherwise is lying to you and it is best to discard everything they have to say about any topic that ever comes up.


Secondly, plasma phosphor cells have a decay time, indicated by how long it takes for the cell to stop producing light after it has been charged. If the decay time takes longer than 16ms, which happens in specific cases, you get blur during motion. As an example, play Fallout 3 on any Panasonic plasma. The extremely green nature of the game, combined with Panasonic's delayed green decay time, combined with the human eye's hyper-sensitivity specific to green, create a fairly heavily blurry image. NOTE: I am not saying that Panasonics are bad, I love mine. This one specific game just highlights a specific issue extremely well.



So, the end result is that any flat panel that you pick out is going to blur in specific cases. It's just a matter of whether the blur is before the pixel is lit, or afterward. In most cases, you'll never even notice on modern panels, but sometimes motion will be an issue, just as it was with CRTs, and is with DLP. No display technology is immune.


As I said, ignore that first paragraph of his. It is nothing but poorly informed half-truths. That second paragraph isn't much better, but at least there aren't any outright lies in it. Well, aside from that image retention bit. And the implication that the pixel orbiter is some sort of Pioneer exclusive thing... Okay, it's probably best to ignore that second paragraph as well.

In which situations do DLP's have motion "issues"? I've been using my Samsung 55" DLP for about 2.5 years now exclusively for gaming and have never noticed any motion blur or other problems. I use a 61" for the living room (tv and movies) and haven't seen anything there either.


With my experience with them, I'd actually highly recommend a DLP except they're hard to find anymore.
 

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I almost bought the 73" Mits DLP they had on sale a few weeks ago, of course I already have 2 projectors so one might ask WTF but I don't always feel like firing up the PJ's to do some gaming, or watch an xvid or whatever....so I still have my 65" Mits (CRT).....problem is gaming on that is tough in HD because you really do notice the lack of resolution, even over my 720p digital display.....the 7" guns in that 2001 set probably do somewhere aruond 720p-ish but focus, convergence and the amount of dust probably inside the box at this point....well lets just say I'm looking for its replacement.


Then again, I could take that $1000 and just buy a bunch of lamps for my PJ's.....that thought also occurred to me :p
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience /forum/post/19610316


In which situations do DLP's have motion "issues"? I've been using my Samsung 55" DLP for about 2.5 years now exclusively for gaming and have never noticed any motion blur or other problems. I use a 61" for the living room (tv and movies) and haven't seen anything there either.


With my experience with them, I'd actually highly recommend a DLP except they're hard to find anymore.

Some people see a rainbow effect (where a small rainbow like trail follow the object) on moving objects in high contrast situations. It's due to the color wheel not refreshing the screen all at once. I only ever noticed it when the camera would pan quickly with a small white object against a dark background. I saw it much more frequently in movies than games.
 
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