AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 120 hz Sharp Aquos HD TV that I bought because I was impressed with how the 120 hz display televisions at Best Buy display blu-rays in what appears to be a higher framerate. I am using a Playstation 3 to play blu-rays on and am having trouble finding the settings to make it look like it does in the store, with that high frame-rate look. Does anyone know any specific settings I need to change to achieve this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,554 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by PartTimeHero28 /forum/post/15458820


I have a 120 hz Sharp Aquos HD TV that I bought because I was impressed with how the 120 hz display televisions at Best Buy display blu-rays in what appears to be a higher framerate. I am using a Playstation 3 to play blu-rays on and am having trouble finding the settings to make it look like it does in the store, with that high frame-rate look. Does anyone know any specific settings I need to change to achieve this?

This might be related to what you are trying to do:


From the PS3 Manual:


BD 1080p 24 Hz Output (HDMI)

Set whether to use 1080p 24 Hz video output mode for output of BD video. Set this option when the system is connected to a TV using an HDMI cable. Adjust the settings as necessary for the TV in use.


[Automatic] Set to automatically switch the video output mode to match the TV that is connected.

[Off] Set to output at the maximum resolution that has been selected in the video output settings of the PS3 system. (The video output will not be displayed at 1080p 24 Hz.)

[On] Set to output BD video that was recorded at 1080p 24 Hz directly at a resolution of 1080p 24 Hz.


Hints

The TV or AV amplifier (receiver) in use must support 1080p 24 Hz video mode. For details, refer to the instructions supplied with the device.

The Blu-ray Disc (BD) that is to be played must also support 1080p 24 Hz video mode. In most cases, video is recorded at 1080p 24 Hz resolution for commercially available BD video software (BD-ROMs) for which "1080p" is displayed as the recording mode.


If the video output settings do not match the TV in use, video may not be displayed on the screen when the resolution changes. However, the setting will automatically reset to the original resolution after a short while. If nothing is displayed on the screen for more than 30 seconds, turn off the system, and then turn it on again.


If video does not display correctly when [Automatic] or [On] is selected, set this option to [Off].
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,103 Posts
I assume that the TV has to have that feature turned on, independent of how the PS3 is set up.


I personally can't stand to watch 120Hz for more than 30 seconds. Makes me feel a little sick, and I think it makes film (which should be 24fps) look like video, like an HD documentary or home movie, rather than a "film" movie. To each his own.


24Hz playback is for displays that support playing it natively (at 24fps, or a multiple, like 48Hz or 72Hz), to maintain the native 24 frames / second without adding any (3:2) to get 30fps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,196 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by PartTimeHero28 /forum/post/15458820


I have a 120 hz Sharp Aquos HD TV that I bought because I was impressed with how the 120 hz display televisions at Best Buy display blu-rays in what appears to be a higher framerate. I am using a Playstation 3 to play blu-rays on and am having trouble finding the settings to make it look like it does in the store, with that high frame-rate look. Does anyone know any specific settings I need to change to achieve this?

Your answer lies in these two links.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=931796

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=650544
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,554 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberbri /forum/post/15459891


I assume that the TV has to have that feature turned on, independent of how the PS3 is set up.


I personally can't stand to watch 120Hz for more than 30 seconds. Makes me feel a little sick, and I think it makes film (which should be 24fps) look like video, like an HD documentary or home movie, rather than a "film" movie. To each his own.


24Hz playback is for displays that support playing it natively (at 24fps, or a multiple, like 48Hz or 72Hz), to maintain the native 24 frames / second without adding any (3:2) to get 30fps.

When you say 120 Hz makes film look like video, is it possible you are confusing 120 Hz with "Auto Motion Plus" (Samsung's term; Sony has a different term for their similar technology)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,103 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by eweiss /forum/post/15460225


When you say 120 Hz makes film look like video, is it possible you are confusing 120 Hz with "Auto Motion Plus" (Samsung's term; Sony has a different term for their similar technology)?

It's possible. I wasn't aware there was a difference between 120Hz and whatever technologies the new TVs have (Samsung's AMP and Sony's whatever), except that the new stuff is just an extension of 120Hz... I just know that I can't stand it.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top