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I am getting my Mits D-VHS tomorrow. I have heard about several ways to use less espensive tapes. One says drill some holes in the tape. Another says hold the Digital Record button for 20 seconds (or something like that. )

Would someone please clear this up. Thanks.
 

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FBlack:


Both methods are available and work. You can override the tape sense via the button method. However, I have been drilling holes in my tapes so that the VCR will sense it as D-VHS. This circumvents the problem of me forgetting to override the tape sense before recording.


For the hole drilling method, flip the tape over. With the tape louver at the top, you will notice a 9/64" hole on the left-hand edge about 3/4" up from the bottom. Simply drill a matching hole on the right-side of the tape in the same location and your VCR will now sense the tape as D-VHS.
 

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Just put the tape in and then hit the DVHS button. Everytime that DVHS light goes out you MUSDT hit that button again. Annoying! To make it go to DVHS automatically, just drill the hole. Use a DVHS tape as a template to see where the new holes should go. I believe there are 2 but I know one is necessary and I'm not sure what the other does but I drill it as well since it is there and not much bother once I'm set up to drill. I made a jig for my drill press that makes the process fast and easy.
 

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A regular VHS tape has no holes. As purchased, a tape with one hole is a S-VHS tape. A tape purchased with two holes is a D-VHS tape. I always drill the extra hole for the above mentioned reasons plus the 30k is faster on playback to sense it as a D0-VHS tape.
 

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Can the tape sense be overridden by the button method for timed recordings or must you be physically present at the start of the recording for the override to work?
 

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With the dtc100, once you set the mode for the tape, as long you dont tape the tape out, I think it stays so the timer recording works fine.


dave
 

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There's a small plastic post that sticks up thru the transport chassis from the main board. It actuates a switch on the main board that tells the recorder that the tape is VHS. Snip the post off and, from that point on, the JVC will think all cassettes are DVHS.


Replacement switches cost $10. I accept no responsibility for botched snip jobs.:D
 

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As testified to in other threads, there are those who have found that the D-VHS tapes are of better quality and worth the few extra dollars. I know I had problems with S-VHS tapes on my old Hughes D-VHS VCR. I haven't tried anything but D-VHS tapes on the 30K except for SD recordings where S-VHS works fine.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mikey mo
As testified to in other threads, there are those who have found that the D-VHS tapes are of better quality and worth the few extra dollars. I know I had problems with S-VHS tapes on my old Hughes D-VHS VCR. I haven't tried anything but D-VHS tapes on the 30K except for SD recordings where S-VHS works fine.
Just an FYI, SD and HS modes put the same amount of data on the tape. SD simply puts 1 track and HS puts 2 tracks during a rotation of the heads but the tape runs twice as fast in HS. The space between the tracks is the same for both. So a tape that is prone to drop outs in HS will also drop out in SD.


Personally I had very good luck with 120 minute SVHS tapes (JVC, FUJI) and sometimes even better luck with those than the DVHS tapes. Most likely the reason being that the 120 minute tapes are the thickest of the bunch and thus are the most robust, even more than the DVHS tapes, which have to be thinner due to their extended time of 150 minutes.
 

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Most likely the reason being that the 120 minute tapes are the thickest of the bunch and thus are the most robust, even more than the DVHS tapes, which have to be thinner due to their extended time of 150 minutes.
I believe this may have been true several years ago but today many of the manufacturers have adopted same thickness tape for a given grade and just wind different lengths on the spool from 120 to 150 to 180. Less than 120 lengths are also done this way and in some cases use large hubs on T60 and less. I think your supposition was more common about 10 years ago but may still be practiced by some. Also most tape, today is made by just a few manufacturers and labeled for each name brand and all tape is basically the thin variety, thin enough to get 180 minutes on a standard spool.

Look for this in a standard grade by the same manufacturer, such as Fuji:

Look at the wind of a T120, T160 and T180 or just weigh it. If you find the wind or weight greater than a T160 then it may be of thicker tape. It is not what I have noticed here in the past 10 years though.
 
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