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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was talking with a poster that was nice enough to explain that what some of the members told me to to was pure BS. I am crippled

I need to know exactly how to get te best resolution ona HDTV from a computer.



I was told by a few that a VGA to Component adapter would Not do the trick, It was explained to me that it was BS and to save my money as the adapter wouldn't get me no 1024 X 768 when the manufacturer and this member who owns the same name of the HDTV said differently.



When I looked it up on the higher priced model than I had was the number 640 X 480 at 60Hz. A bit less than the the other posters had given me!


Enough with the games, please if you really don't know the answer don't respond. If you want to help a crippled user, I know if I could I would. It would give me a good feeling that I gave the right information to help, not build up my posts to get more stars by my name.


I can fit up to a 46 inch HDTV in my disabled apartment, name the HDTV. Name what I have to buy what make, model money to send. I will do the rest, I have the money. But not the knowedge at this time. I will learn at age 54 I am a student. I must get the right information before I buy the HDTV. After it's bought, notes are printed.



I can go to a different forum to ask for professional advice on which computer would fit my needs and be compatible with the HDTV.


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Disclaimer: I don't have a HTPC, so I'm not an HTPC authority. I was in the market for a HDTV recently so I've researched the sets quite a bit, that's all.


The Philips 60PP9601/55P9701/60PP9701/64PP9751/64PH9905 accept 480p VGA and 600p SVGA @ 60 Hz with the horizontal resolution being flexible (e.g., some users drive their sets at 1072x600p), and one user reports success at 1600x1200i. Besides the convenient 600p SVGA input with just a straight SVGA cable to any PC, the main advantage of these sets as HTPC monitors is that they do a great job of coming close to displaying 1920x1080i in its full glory, significantly closer than direct views and any other 7" gun RPTV's. They have a RGB VGA HD connector as well as a component HD connector. Something is a bit amiss on at least the cheaper models regarding either the interlaced inputs or the internal line doubler, as the color appears washed out on 480i input, but if you pump 480p/600p/1080i into one of the HD progressive inputs, the color is extremely vibrant; you should be fine if you use it with a HTPC or DVDO iScan Pro. The point is, if you don't plan to ever feed your set 480i, then don't judge these sets by how they look on the showroom floor being fed 480i.


720p is something HTPCers lust after, but it is hard to find and is going out of fashion. The 56" Panasonic is one of the few RPTVs that does it.


The RCA MM36110 direct view set is an inexpensive and compact choice for an aspiring HTPCer. It does 640x480p VGA at 72 Hz (72 Hz is another thing HTPCers lust after), and it does 800x600p SVGA at 60 Hz. Like most direct view sets, its effective resolution is around the DVD level, no where close to 1920x1080i. It lacks a line doubler, but you can use dTV/dScaler. It lacks an anamorphic squeeze, but you can permanently squeeze the set's 1080i mode, and for DVD's and TV, you'll be pumping in 600p nonanamorphic from your HTPC, which is about as good as the 480p anamorphic that competing sets like the Sony 36XBR400 can do.


A lot of HTPCers are happy with the Sampo direct view sets, especially the Sampo SME-34HDWHD5. Like the RCA MM36110, this Sampo set also lacks an internal line doubler. I'm not familiar with the details of this set, but it accepts HDTV, PAL, and NTSC input, and some marketing propaganda claims:
Quote:
Using a multi-scan system and RGB computer connectors, the SME-34WHD5 is capable of displaying VGA (640 x 480), SVGA (800 x 600), and XGA (1024 x 768) resolutions. In addition, the SME-34WHD5 is Windows® Plug and Play compatible, automatically adjusting the computer's output for maximum performance on the SME-34WHD5.
And of course, there are front projectors, many of which also solve your space problems, but I'll let someone else speak up about that. It's hard to find a super high resolution one for a reasonable price, even used, especially if you rule out LCD models, but it still might make sense to get an expensive used one, which you could later resell for a decent price, unlike an RPTV, which depreciates rapidly.


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Abdul

Click to subscribe to Philips_HDTV discussion group



[This message has been edited by Abdul Jalib (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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Lassy,


Just remember that there are manufacturers that make connecting a computer very simple, and others who have made it difficult to discourage the use of your HDTV as a PC monitor.


The sets that are PC compatible are often built with a VGA input. They should specify the resolution (i.e. 640x480 or 800x600, and almost never 1024x768 unless they scale to this resolution or if it's LCD/DLP with higher native rate).


If the set has component inputs, then it is most limited and varies from set to set, but most likely able to 640x480 or 960x540. The magic number here is the second, the vertical resolution, which is the limiting factor. The only set that can handle higher is the 720p capable Panasonic. These sets WILL need the converter, but keep in mind that the limit on the resolution is not the PC or the converter, but rather the TV set. It is best to refer to other's experience, as not all sets work in the same way when it comes to transcoder/VGA>Component converters.


Kei Clark

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Lassy:


Why don't you post the physical width, depth, and height of the HDTV that you could accomodate in you apartment.


Pioneer makes 53" HDTVs. Anything much smaller than 50" will not be much of a size change from what you currently have with your standard television (just a third wider).

www.pioneerelectronics.com/Pioneer/CDA/HomeProducts/HomeProductDetails/0,1422, 548,00.html


The WxHxD is 50x51x25 (inches)

A 53" 16x9 screen is not that big and should fit in most apartments since you could watch it at 7 feet with and HD picture, DVD, etc. However, as Kei said, will only get 640x480 or 960x540 resolution via a computer input (The Pioneer I listed has a VGA HD-15 input so you can directly connect a PC to the TV...you will need to use powerstrip for custom resolutions though). However, you will find the vertical resolution limitation a problem in running PC applications on a RP HDTV.


Have you considered a small front projection system assuming you can control the ambient light in your apartment? You could use a portable screen or a white wall (if smooth) for a display surface. This would allow 800x600 (or higher dependeing on your price point) for PC use and you could make the screen any size you desire.


A front projector is the way to go if you will be using it heavily for PC use. I don't think you would be happy with a RP HDTV if this is your prime concern?


[This message has been edited by Fireball (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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Lassy,


Gee, I guess I misundertood your original question.

Quote:
I need to know exactly how to get te best resolution ona HDTV from a computer.
There are no monitors currently available at exactly 46" at this time. But you can wait for Samsung to introduce their 43" Widescreen LCD, which should fit your bill, albeit, it is still 3" smaller than your exact requirements. It's still not available on the market as yet, but should be shortly. You can find info on this unit at the link Cliff Watson directed you to earlier.


P.S. Please don't call me Mr. Clark. Kei will suffice.


Kei Clark

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lassy,


Panasonic DOES make a 47" Widescreen released a week ago.. the Panasonic PT47WX49 lists at $1999


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Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, Pause and Reflect
 

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lassy,


I don't know why you're even bothering with the forum to shop for an HDTV. Find yourself a decent dealer who can explain what you need to know and set it up for you. Sometimes there is just no substitute for this type of service.


Joh Moschella
 

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Mitsubishi makes a 46-inch 16x9, and they've recently been cut in price. Joe Michaels, DVD File Forum moderator has one of these units, and really likes it (FYI it was the biggest set he could squeeze through the stairwell leading into his basement HT).


RD
 

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Keep in mind that Lassy was also complaining about PC resolution. In a roundabout way, his rants were pointing out that he can't get 1024x768 or anywhere near it most consumer HDTV.


Kei Clark

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
KeiClark is calling a disabled woman by "his rants" snip.

What gave him the right to judge me, I used good netiquette I called Mister, but since he could

not convince me to his thinking he resorts to immature thinking of using a he instead of a she, and uses the word rant, instead of y plea for help. I know what a rant is and I am not guilty of his mans deliberately trying to lower me has lowered him by his use of the word He not she. I registered as lassy a womans name in the scotish Language, not the dog from the early "Lassie Come Home" film starring the late Roddy Mcdowell


I didn't want to have a name that is refered to a dog, instead of the correct term in the Scotish Language. So I put a 'y' on it not 'ie'. I am sorry but today is 2001 Where a man or a woman is to be considered equal to each other.


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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Riverside thanks, I will check it out.


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Lassy:


Please lower the tone a bit. I think minor misunderstandings here are getting blown out of proportion. (But reading your phrases "pure BS" and "Enough with the games" did make me think rant was not too far from accurate.)


I feel your frustration regarding the state of the HDTV world. Today's lower-priced and smaller HDTVs aren't up to the display quality of computer monitors.


Best wishes for your success. I'm sorry I can't help you more.


FYI, Kei Clark is a woman, too. And I've found her to be courteous and pleasant to deal with.


Regards,

yogaman


[This message has been edited by yogaman (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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I just love irony. Lassy, I can understand your frustration when somebody calls you 'he' instead of 'she', but Kei is also a 'she'.


As for an HDTV recommendation, 46" narrows your choices.


Mitsubishi has a 46" RPTV that sells for $2000 now. It's a nice set; I have it's 55" big brother. However, the best desktop resolution you're going to get without overscan is 920x500, so that may not be acceptable if you're wanting 1024x768. That's just not going to happen unless you go to a front-projection setup.


Toshiba has a 40" set, but IMHO it's too small, and again has the 1080i/540p limitation.


I don't know anything about this new Panny 47" set, but if it's just been announced you'll probably have a hard time finding it in stores.


Jeff



[This message has been edited by JKohn (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
John M. are you talking to an 'able to ambulate' or walk into a showroom and ask questions person?


Or since I am a crippled human being, to call a disabled counselor and ask him/her about whats new for the disabled.


John you take walking for granted, heaven help you, if you should ever become the other guy to for just 2 seconds. Like Christopher Reeves did in that amount of time. He instead of being able to jump horses and be the 1978 Man of Steel AKA Superman.


Became a paraplegic from the neck down. Like I said you take walking for granted, my conditon also ruined my truck driving career at age 38.


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Lassy,


I'm sure you've heard the old saying, "Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it." This is especially true when asking for advice. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif I assure you that everyone is trying to be helpful, but we all approach this hobby/obsession from different angles.


When it comes to HDTV there are some really interesting things going on and it takes quite a bit of effort to learn enough about the technology to make good buying decisions. For example, to the best of my knowledge there is no RPTV that can fully resolve the 1080i. The electronics support the resolution, but the individual CRT projection tubes cannot produce enough brightness at that resolution to fully resolve all the detail that is present. So, the specs that a manufacture will provide often only cover the electronics of the TV and will not be the best indicator of the actual achievable resolution.


When if comes to RPTV the 9 inch CRT are the big guns. These CRT's come close to providing full resolution at acceptable brightness. I'm not sure which TV's have these guns, but you can be certain the the TV will be on the larger side. 60+ inches. Other technologies like LCD and DILA are beginning to be used in TVs and these devices have hard resolution numbers the are based on pixel addressing rather than scan line addressing. That preciseness is what makes digital devices easier to quantify and understand.


My overall point is that HDTV is an evolving technology and any equipment you buy will have a set of features and tradeoffs that are unique. As such, you can't plug a bunch of numbers into a formula and have a given answer pop out. In a perfect world it would be that simple, but this is not a perfect world.


IMHO, the complexities of HDTV make it more rewarding to be an early adopter. At this point in the game each time a person buys a TV it makes a strong statement to the companies involved. We are in some respects pointing the way for the rest of the population. If we all ran out and purchased 4:3 HDTV compatible TVs you would see the number of 16:9 TVs being offered drop almost over night. What I suggest is to take some time and really do the research. Ask for help when you need, but don't let anyone make the decision for you. There are some on the forum who researched their buying decision for many many months before buying. I personally reserched my projector for about 3 months. Remember, in the end you're the one who has to pay for the equipment and it pays to do the research.


One last point before I wrap up the post. There are some very well educated / self educated / knowledgeable / smart people on this forum. Even with all this knowledge and intelligence there are still technical disagreements from time to time. While it may not be common knowledge, science and engineering can often be just as much a matter of opinion vs. a matter of fact.


[This message has been edited by JoeFloyd (edited 05-12-2001).]
 

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Lassy, I really like my Mits WS55805 for DVDs by way of my computer. I believe the current Mits 46807 at $1,999 is a good option for you. For widescreen movies I use the resolution of 1584 x 540 or 960 x 540. All you need to connect a computer up to the tv is a breakout cable. Really you could go to the HDTV hardware forum and solicit inputs on a tv for your needs as most all can be connected to a computer for DVD viewing.


Good Luck


Rick


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Wezar:


Your points are all good ones. I bought a Mitsubishi 55 inch, 16x9 format, HDTV-ready set for my father (maybe the same model number; I don't recall), and he's quite happy with it. (The reds are more saturated than I prefer, so I have a smaller Toshiba TW40X81.)


However, for Lassy, note that she's not satisfied with 640x480, and even though the set will do 960x540p with the right graphics card in the HTPC, she may not feel that it gives enough resolution for computer graphics display.


JoeFloyd gives great advice. There are lots of opinions here, and it's hard to know from the anonymity of the forum whether the person giving the advice uses the same criteria as you do. When it comes to something as personal as the perception of image quality, it's best to look for yourself.


Lassy, if it's too hard for you to travel to local dealers, is there a more mobile friend or relative you'd trust to make the evaluation for you?


I wish it were simpler, but there will always be tradeoffs.


Best wishes,

-yogaman
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yogaman I have only one parent who is 83 who does not even know what 'stereo' sounds like, the TV speakers are good enough. Does that answer your question? The other sister doesn't even know what a webtv is.


I am alone but I am not afraid either. My other parent died 11 years ago. The parents like all people live their lives, then the next generation and so forth.


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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just one more question and it relates to computers that are hooked up HDTV. Page 56 0f 2002

catalog of mitsubishi. "Displaying stationary images, such as side bars shown on non expanded standard-shaped TV images should be limited to 15% of total viewing per week" I quoted the catalog word for word.



I use webtv about 5 hours a day to a DVD movie of 1.45 hours,if I would be limited to 15%. I wouldn't know what else to do, I don't have commercial filled cable or DSS. I refuse to pay for the service then get only 43.5 minutes of program, to 17.5 minutes of useless annoying commericals.



I read about 1.5 hours per day listen to about 3 C.D. and watch that one DVD movie then go back on the web for 1.5 hours then bed. This is the same program 7 days a week for their are no weekends or holidays, the next day is just the same as the last one. I get out to your world about 7-2 hour days a year!


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