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If a speaker has ports, is it OK to plug in the ports (or altleast one port) to make the bass tighter?


I am aware that it would be harder (i.e. require more power) for the woofer cones to move, but if I stayed within the rated power for the speakers and kept the volumes reasonable, would I be doing something wrong?


I know this is done in the subwoofer world, but has anyone done this for regular speakers?


Thanks.
 

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Ah, arbitrary physics.


Don't do it. If the speaker was designed with a port, don't screw with the design. Plugging the port changes the Q of the system, and the response curve will be less accurate. The bass driver's compliance was selected for a ported design, and is not the higher compliance needed for a sealed system. The enclosure may be too flimsy for a sealed system. And on and on...


God, I could go on for pages, but just don't do it. There are way, way, WAY too many laws of physics involved here that are interdependent.


SEATON! JUMP IN HERE!!
 

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Here's another short and (not so) sweet answer. Plugging your port will pretty much guarantee 2 things - you will kill your low end response, and you will gain a giant midbass hump around 100 - 300HZ, depending on the woofer used. I'd recommend against it too... ;)
 

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Paul I agree with most of your posts, but I think you take this subject a bit too seriously. Its a speaker not an Formula race car. As a teenager I used to take speakers out of some cheap ported stereo cabinets, and put it in an enclosed wood cabinets, and they always sounded MUCH better.


Warnings about "compliance" and response curves and whether the cone can handle the pressure ... in the end, if it sounds better to you with a plug in the port, go for it.


That said, i probably wouldnt do it to expensive speakers... :)
 

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petiteface-


It is generally not recommended by the 'designer' of YOUR speakers.


A search on google groups rec.audio.high-end will net his comments.


enter 'Richard D Pierce port plug'


BTW, his comments 'more or less' backs up Paul's comments above.
 

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To expand on the above posted link (from rexxe), stuffing a port with pillow type material really is just turning your box into an aperiodic enclosure (lossy sealed box). Depending on room response, or re-inforcement of the bottom end, this could actually provide an improvement. However, there's no specific science that's handy to guide you - it'll be all trial and error, and you'll probably just end up pulling all the stuffing back out.
 

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Quote:
Paul I agree with most of your posts, but I think you take this subject a bit too seriously. Its a speaker not an Formula race car. As a teenager I used to take speakers out of some cheap ported stereo cabinets, and put it in an enclosed wood cabinets, and they always sounded MUCH better.
Well, there you have it. Proof positive. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D


If you plug the port of a properly designed ported loudspeaker, you will foul up the bass response. The fact that you may like the sound better does not change the absolutes of physics.


Oh, and I don't take anything seriously. ;)
 

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Don't a lot of ported speakers come supplied from the manufacturer with foam plugs (bungs) to put in the ports? I know that B&W does this with several of their lines. FWIW, I never liked the sound with the plugs in - too much mid-bass.
 
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