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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a few photos of the roughed in plumbing that were set when the house was built. I'm trying to figure out the reasoning behind each pipe. Obviously the 4" is for the toilet, but why is it so close to the 1.5"?


Is this "setup" for a toilet/sink bathroom? In other words if I want to add a shower, am I going to be digging up some concrete? I can't put a shower over the top of the one closest to the wall can I?




I would really like to have the toilet facing the wall that is shown, the area just to the right of the first photo will be a hallway so I don't want to encroach on that space if possible.
 

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The pipe closest to the 4" is most likely a vent for the drain lines. It almost looks as if the intent was to locate it in a area where a wall might go.
 

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Makes sense to me. The larger pipe center should be 12 inches from the finished face of a wall for a toilet flange. The pipe closest to it is intended to be in the wall and you can hook your vanity sink drain to it going laterally in the wall. The last pipe is for a tub. which almost always requires busting out the concrete and fine tuning the drain and trap to accommodate your tub/shower of choice.


Now what I don't see is provision for the venting. take a picture of the ceiling, let's see if they roughed anything in. If they put in some PVC that goes up to the attic, that is to be used for the vent. You will need to extend through the roof.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is about the best I can get for now at work, I could take more pictures later.


Pipe that angles on the left I'm assuming is the vent, ties into the existing venting of the upper floors. Pipe to the right has a check valve and ties into the main 4" drain that heads to the sewer.


To give you some rough dimensions



I kind of get what you are saying Big, but I want to avoid that direction, I would be height limited due to the ductwork as well as there being a hallway/stairwell near there.


Plus I think adding all three on the same wet wall would be cramped [tub-sink-toilet-]
 

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Its funny, I go down in my basement and try to mentally figure out how the rough in is supposed to be working every so often. I should post mine. I forgot about the vent, I am going to have to go look at it again tonight. I am no plumber.


I am a bit envious that your builder appears to have put the furnace, HW heater, sump, electrical panel, (water softner?) all in one general place - instead of just littering them throughout the basement based on where the utility entered the structure.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by R1Jester /forum/post/15495895



I kind of get what you are saying Big, but I want to avoid that direction, I would be height limited due to the ductwork as well as there being a hallway/stairwell near there.


Plus I think adding all three on the same wet wall would be cramped [tub-sink-toilet-]

My bathroom has all 3 on the same wet wall. Per code about the closest you can cram all 3(tub, toilet, vanity) is 84" (7ft). Mine is 8' 2", its not huge, but not too cramped. My old master was close(right at) that 7' limit.


BTW the math is as follows:


30" for the tub (standard size) + 24" for a small vanity + 30" for the toilet (Plumbing code calls for 15" either way from the center of the flange.


As for height, could you move the duct or soffit it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/15496139


One pipe is confusing, the one off the elbow that heads down at the rear of the sump hatch? where does it go?

Looks like maybe a common dry vent. I'll bet that pipe under the slab and vents the stubbed bath...
 

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Offhand where's the main soil stack for the house? does it come out of the wall or floor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It goes right down into the concrete. I'm guessing it's a vent for the floor drain. You can't tell from the pictures but it's just off to the side. Condensate line runs in there as well as the drain from the water softener.


A different view
 

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Thats likely the vent for that drain. Those stubs have to be vented somewhere or they wouldnt have passed inspection. Regardless if they are not where you need/want them... a jackhammer is the only solution. Are there any neighbors with this model/layout with a finished bath you can look at for hints? I did that with my bath. They builder had 3 other with finished basements that I used as examples for how mine needed to be laid out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I checked with the neighbors, of the two similar layouts, only one had finished the basement, however only with a toilet and vanity, no shower. That would make life easiest I suppose, but I think if its cost feasible, getting a shower in there is the way to go.
 

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Well you could use corner unit. Rough plumbing isnt hard, though cutting up the floor is dusty and labor intensive. Would a layout like this work?

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Rough plumbing is a no brainer for me, I just wanted to avoid getting into the slab if at all possible.

I'm a bit confused by your drawing, are you saying use a corner unit sink? I'd have to do some measuring but that might be close to hitting the toilet, or at the very least only leaving like 1' clearance between the two.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nargesem /forum/post/15496516


Thats likely the vent for that drain. Those stubs have to be vented somewhere or they wouldnt have passed inspection. Regardless if they are not where you need/want them... a jackhammer is the only solution. Are there any neighbors with this model/layout with a finished bath you can look at for hints? I did that with my bath. They builder had 3 other with finished basements that I used as examples for how mine needed to be laid out.

Eric:


The stubs for the do not have to be vented to pass inspection. Venting comes during the installation process. I confirmed this with my inspector when I was just starting out. I guess it may vary by state and city/county, but that's what my inspector told me.


To the OP...breaking the floor is not as hard as you would think. Rental of the 60lb electric jackhammer was about $55 for a day, and I was able to move the rough in for the shower over about 2 feet. It was not a big deal...it is dusty but I think it was harder to finish the drywall!



CJ
 

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Really... CJ, I had to have my vents in for R/I hmm go figure. OP, I meant a corner shower... you need 15 " from center of toilet R/I to wall, vanity etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nargesem /forum/post/15497120


Really... CJ, I had to have my vents in for R/I hmm go figure. OP, I meant a corner shower... you need 15 " from center of toilet R/I to wall, vanity etc.

Sorry...I didn't mean for rough in inspection...I mean that my inspector told me that when the builder finished the house with the stubbies like the OP shows, no venting was required. I did have to provide for venting before I was able to pass my rough in inspection when I was finishing the basement.


CJ
 

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CJ, now that makes sense... I need more sleep



Really bad sketch, but it might
Pocket door would work beautifully...
 
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