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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I am putting a small bar in where the drycore is on the floor. It will be a small "L" shaped countertop with some cabinets above. I would like to put a small sink in it.


Behind the wall is the utility closet (note the door on the left).




Behind the wall is the furnace. In the following picture the wall in the right with the electircal switch and conduit is the wall the bar backs up to. Notice the drain in the floor for the furnace.




My question is: Is the any issue with draining my sink into this drain and since there is already a trap in this drain (below the concrete) do I need a trap under the sink as well?
 

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You WANT a trap below the sink. Should something ever drop into the sink you want the option to retrieve it out of the sink trap.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RPh Drew /forum/post/16971536


Ok I am putting a small bar in where the drycore is on the floor. It will be a small "L" shaped countertop with some cabinets above. I would like to put a small sink in it.


Behind the wall is the utility closet (note the door on the left).




Behind the wall is the furnace. In the following picture the wall in the right with the electircal switch and conduit is the wall the bar backs up to. Notice the drain in the floor for the furnace.




My question is: Is the any issue with draining my sink into this drain and since there is already a trap in this drain (below the concrete) do I need a trap under the sink as well?
 

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That drain is for condensate and excess water from a humidifier and if it is like my house goes over to the sump pump. Where does yours go? I'm taking a guess but I doubt it is code legal to hook a plumbing fixture that exits the house via a sump pump to the outside.


You could use one of those under-sink reservoir pumps but it needs to be connected to the sewer drain. You could probably put the reservoir in the furnace room instead of under the sink.


If that truly connects to the sewer you could chip out a little concrete and install an in wall drain line, probably would need a studor valve because I don't see a vent stack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No sump or lift pumps. My house is on the side of a hill and it part of the normal septic system that gravity feeds down hill to twin septic tanks and a then a drain field. There is a s-trap below the concrete.


If I hooked air tight to the drain I could use the studor vent but then wouldn't be able to drain the air conditioner or furnace humidifier.


I was hoping not to have to dig into the concrete but are you suggesting I tie into the drain line down stream of the current in floor trap and just treat it like any other drain with a trap under the sink and the studor vent?


The wall is only 5' wide so counter space is going to be limited anyway. I wonder if I should bag the whole sink thing??? I just hate rinsing out cups or emptying can/bottles in the bathroom. Probably need to give this some more thought.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan /forum/post/16971695


You WANT a trap below the sink. Should something ever drop into the sink you want the option to retrieve it out of the sink trap.

Probably a good point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/16971980


Where is the vent stack for that trap?

When looking in the same direction at the furnace, just to the left of the furnace is the bathroom sink vent stack. It is a 2" line that goes up and covers the bathroom sink, toilet, shower and I assume (cautiously) the two infloor drains in the utility room. All the plumbing other than the vent stack is under the concrete.


The flow moves from left to right (in the above picture) and from the bath and furnace back toward where I was standing to take the picture before moving to the right again to the back of the house where the septic is. It makes sense that the vent stack it at the first drain.


Or in this picture... Bath, Utility, Bedroom and out.




So if that is the case it wouldn't matter if I was up or down stream of the in-floor trap as the vent sack in place could cover. I just have to drain into the line and and have a trap in the sink. Correct?
 

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Might want to consider one of these:
http://www.flotecwater.com/pdf/S6228...Sell_Sheet.pdf


You just direct connect to your sink and pump up into your main drain (or possibly some branch connection). No vent or trap needed per Nationional Plumbing Code but should check with your local authority to make sure they approve. The datasheet references actual code for single fixture installations.


I just mentioned this earlier today in my build thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks all.


I would hate to use a pump when all I need is gravity feed and the drain line is just a foot or two away.


I will have to "stew" on this for a bit.


Options

1. dig in

2. call a pro and let him mess with it.

3. Eliminate the sink from the bar.


I have seen others digging into the concrete for drains but I am just not looking forward to it (even if I would get to rent some new tools...
)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/16974323


Don't underestimate the psychological benefit of running a jack hammer.

Like you I was worried about opening up my concrete. In hindsight, it wasn't that big of a deal.
 

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Like others have said, it's not a big deal. It's fun to break things up with a jack hammer!


I was really worried about it too. In retrospect, it was one of the easiest parts of the project, and it was fun too.


CJ
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamis /forum/post/16973488


Or this:

http://www.saniflo.com/SANIVITE.aspx



I have a SaniPlus for my kitchenette sink plus the half bath. You'd tie into your main line to the septic system.

How's the Sanivite working for you? Did you do the install?


My plan is to use either that or the Sanishower for my bar sink and possibly a laundry sink.
 

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I definately wouldn't skip the sink... even if you have to pay someone to do it.


That said, I ran some electrical conduit under the concrete and it wasn't that bad. I used a diamond blade skill saw, a cold chisel (instead of a jack hammer), 3lb sledge, and a shop vac to do it. It was easy, but physically draining work without the jackhammer.
 

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I think you definitely want a normal drain...dumping a sink full of soapy water into there does not seam like the best idea, if it suds up, they will spill up and out onto the floor. Unless of course you seal it.
 

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Jackhammers are fun. I had to break some concrete for my tb drain. I was hesitant, but once I got over the fear it was worth the effort. Plus ist manly, just be prepared for dust!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by carboranadum /forum/post/16975289


Like others have said, it's not a big deal. It's fun to break things up with a jack hammer!


I was really worried about it too. In retrospect, it was one of the easiest parts of the project, and it was fun too.


CJ

I need to cut about a 10 foot section of floor open to tie into my drain...I'm glad to hear the task may not be as daunting as it looks like it will be.
 
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