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Discussion Starter #1
Windows XP hacked by Thai pirates

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Pirated versions of Microsoft's new OS are selling for $2.70 in Thailand a week before the official launch there--suggesting that the software's security features have been cracked.


from an article @ zdnews.com
 

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OK, I'll bite. How does that relate to HDCP?


Apparently, HDCP provides data blocks for GUI, bi-directional link and encryption keys all using different coding requirements and protocols in their implementation.
 

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Just to clarify things a bit - that headline is typical sensationalism by the media. It wasn't "cracked" as that would imply the key algorithm has been figured out. Rather what seems to have happened is they got a hold of a corporate or OEM key and are simply distributing that. A corporate key is used by companies who purchase a large number of licenses from Microsoft. They can then validate all the Windows XP licenses they have with that single key rather than get a separate key for every client they configure. Becomes very useful in automated rollouts.


What I think the Thai folks seem to have not figured out is Microsoft can disable that key anytime they choose to rendering those CD's useless. And Microsoft can track that key back to the OEM or Corporation it was leaked from.


But yes - I too am curious as to how this relates to HDCP?
 

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My point has been, for last 2+Y, that instead of spending much $$$, aggravating HDTV early adopter by promising obsoletion of

our HDTV gear and stalling development of HDTV in this country,

MPAA should've just let it go and let us pay the $20 for movies and content we want, starting in summer of 1999.


Hack of Win XP protection has very little to do with actual/possible defeat of HDCP protection but is does create a precedent of much touted and "unbreakable" protection being broken/fooled.


Do you know ppl what would pay $2.70 for HDTV versions of their favorite movies, made in HK ? I betcha their number is growing every time MPAA lets off yet another stream of p*ss onto those

who have spent hard earned money to buy HDTV gear.
 

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Good luck. With HDCP one needs to record at about 600 megs per second and have storage of about 300 gigs per hour. You got that equipment?
 

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Although there is no consumer equiptment exists to do such, the dedicated pirate could build it fairly easily. I mean, getting a few hundred gigs of harddrive space doesn't really cost all that much, and the space would only have to be temporary until you could compress the data. And 600 Mbps, although a pretty decent amount could easily be handled by a 32 bit bus running at 20 Mhz dumping off to an array of harddrives each taking in data in turn. So it's not really that difficult, just expensive to build such a device. Besides, what you're talking about recording is the data involved in DVI, nothing particular to the HDCP encryption, so all you're really suggesting is that HDCP is unnecessary, not that it is in any way not broken.


Also, all of your statements about HDCP in your first post to this thread are completely incorrect. Likely, you are thinking of DVI, but I don't really know. I'm not a DVI expect.


Keith Irwin
 

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I'd like to note that Keith Irwin's interesting analysis of HDCP's vulneralbilities has been posted on the net for nearly five months and Mr. Irwin remains free. This would support the assertion that nothing in the DMCA forbids the open discussion of methods for defeating technological protections of copyrighted material, just the use, manufacture, distribution and/or sale of devices (computer programs and/or machines) implementing such methods.


-- Mike Scott
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by KeithIrwin
Although there is no consumer equiptment exists to do such, the dedicated pirate could build it fairly easily.
Neither HDCP or DTCP are expected by their creators or proponents to stop the "dedicated pirate". They think that due diligence and legal prosecution with tools like the DMCA will help control such crimes. However, they lose enough money today through people dubbing every tape and disc they rent from Blockbuster to VHS and lending them around for free; they stand to lose even more money from Divx-compressed ripped DVDs being traded around for free on Gnutella and other PTP networks. HDCP and DTCP are attempts to slow this down, at least for the released HD transfers. Hard to say how successful they'll be, but they think its necessary that they do something.


-- Mike Scott
 

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Quote:
HDCP and DTCP are attempts to slow this down, at least for the released HD transfers. Hard to say how successful they'll be, but they think its necessary that they do something.
They are doing something. They are continuing to insist on standards which will probably not easily gain market acceptance. This puts the risk on the CE manufacturers and effectively stalls the release of HD premium material which might be copied. Most likely this is exactly what they want, in liew of a workable technical solution, or the passage of the Disney/Hollings SSSCA bill.


- Tom
 
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