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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking at TVs for a couple months and finally found a PNxxB650 I could take a look at and hear the "buzzing" sound people complain about. When I heard it, I knew I recognized the buzz from somewhere and remembered the simple solution to fixing it.


At the start of last year, many high end video cards for computer gaming had a buzz when running 200+ fps. This usually happened on low quality menu screens and older games. The culprit? Capacitors.


The problems the video cards have are consistent with the problems the Samsung TVs are having. Some cards come with little or no buzz, others will buzz terribly in certain settings once you really get some current running through the cards. Maybe it was a bad production of capacitors some time last year--both ATI and Nvidia cards have the problems. They are not considered faulty by any of the card manufacturers.


The solution is to put a heavy coat of nail polish over the capacitors. I did it on my Radeon 4890 and it stopped the buzzing. I overclock the already extremely hot-running card and have had no problems for the past 4 months. Other substances can be used as well.


Read this if you're interested in the solution: http://theovalich.wordpress.com/2008...280-squealing/
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pete2s /forum/post/16950203


I've been looking at TVs for a couple months and finally found a PNxxB650 I could take a look at and hear the "buzzing" sound people complain about. When I heard it, I knew I recognized the buzz from somewhere and remembered the simple solution to fixing it.


At the start of last year, many high end video cards for computer gaming had a buzz when running 200+ fps. This usually happened on low quality menu screens and older games. The culprit? Capacitors.


The problems the video cards have are consistent with the problems the Samsung TVs are having. Some cards come with little or no buzz, others will buzz terribly in certain settings once you really get some current running through the cards. Maybe it was a bad production of capacitors some time last year--both ATI and Nvidia cards have the problems. They are not considered faulty by any of the card manufacturers.


The solution is to put a heavy coat of nail polish over the capacitors. I did it on my Radeon 4890 and it stopped the buzzing. I overclock the already extremely hot-running card and have had no problems for the past 4 months. Other substances can be used as well.

Lol....anyone brave enough to try this? hahahha....



Samsung Tech: "Umm...why does your television smell like nail polish?"

*Samsung tech glances are your fingernails*

Me: " Oh, the cat must have knocked off the nail polish bottle I set on top of the television for my...wife...."

*suddenly realizes he's single*

*hangs head*

Me: "But this guy on the forums said to put nail polish on the capacitors and it would stop buzzing!"

Samsung Tech: "Suuurreee......"
 

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sounds like a great idea, if anyone would be willing to try it
but you could send this on to samsung, for what its worth, maybe they will take note, and could find a solution, this could bring a whole new meaning to "touch of color" haha
 

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Hi Pete:


That sounds like a very creative solution. The felt tape fix on previous years models was a similar fix. If it works, you'll be a hero to a lot of folks on this board. What exactly does the nail polish do to the capacitors?
 

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Hi,


Why not just ask Samsung to have their engineers identify which capacitors and replace them with ones from a fresh batch (if they are the problem) when they come round to fix the TV?


Bazzy!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heron25 /forum/post/16953240


Hi Pete:


That sounds like a very creative solution. The felt tape fix on previous years models was a similar fix. If it works, you'll be a hero to a lot of folks on this board. What exactly does the nail polish do to the capacitors?

Don't even think about trying it. If you mess with the internals of the set, you will invalidate the warranty.


Besides; if nail polish had such noise suppresing properties, then we wouldn't be hearing all that noise coming out of Joan Rivers, and those women on The View.
 

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I would never do this! It is creative however. Not quite sure how nail polish on the surface of a capacitory can change how much juice the panel draws on bright screens.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heron25 /forum/post/16953567


I would never do this! It is creative however. Not quite sure how nail polish on the surface of a capacitory can change how much juice the panel draws on bright screens.

Even if it worked, all one would be doing is masking the problem. If it is being caused by "a bad batch of capacitors", it is likely that they will also fail much sooner than a good batch would.


It is better to get rid of the bad unit as soon as one is received, rather than living in dread that those defective capacitors will fail right after the warranty period has expired.


Beware of the curse of the Crapacitors.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland /forum/post/16953497


Besides; if nail polish had such noise suppresing properties, then we wouldn't be hearing all that noise coming out of Joan Rivers, and those women on The View.

That's a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you research the video card problem, many had success with a hot glue application. I've seen manufacturers put hot glue on boards.


It is my understanding the nail polish or glue stops the extremely small and rapid vibration of the capacitors. On video cards, the buzz actually becomes a squeal once enough juice is running through the cards. This is consistent with the buzz on samsung's getting louder as the brightness is increased.


You do likely void your warranty if you do this. If there are any warranty seal stickers, you'll have to be careful removing them.


The TV probably has one main board you would have to do this on.
 

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I don't have a B650, but the buzz is described as being only in the sweet spot, like a focused beam of buzzing sound. I am thinking there could be a resonance (sound waves bouncing back and forth between the flat screen and the flat wall it is facing, if the distance is an integral number of half wavelengths). So the wave bouncing back from the wall is in phase with the wave being generated by the buzzing capacitor or inductor or whatever is vibrating inside the set. The effect is that you get reinforcement of the sound amplitude at the frequencies that are in resonance. Sort of like a laser or maser.

Can you guys (with the buzzers) try this: rotate the TV (maybe 20º or so?), so that it is not parallel with the facing wall? Then move over to get directly in front of it at a normal viewing distance (the "sweet spot") and see if it went away or got reduced. Another thing to try is put a heavy drape or similar on the facing wall directly in front of the TV, or maybe one of those z-fold screens, or anything else that will break up the sound or absorb it or reflect it in a direction away from the TV. Please post what you find.
 
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