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Why convert? You video card will scale it on the fly. I don't think you would save much if anything on filesize.
 

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You can convert it to x264 in an .mkv container. At 50% compression the quality will be very similar to the source. Is your display 720p native though? If so this will work well but not if you need to convert it back to 1080i.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse S /forum/post/0


You can convert it to x264 in an .mkv container. At 50% compression the quality will be very similar to the source. Is your display 720p native though? If so this will work well but not if you need to convert it back to 1080i.

My display is a CRT projector. However, I have my desktop res set to 720p.


Jesse, do you have instructions or know of the proper software to use to accomplish this? I tried a few things to convert to x264 in .mkv, but none of them worked.


Thank you

Darren
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse S /forum/post/0


You can convert it to x264 in an .mkv container. At 50% compression the quality will be very similar to the source. Is your display 720p native though? If so this will work well but not if you need to convert it back to 1080i.

What resolution is 1080i or 720p?

Isn't it 1366 x 768?

That's the native resolution of my Pioneer and it takes either 1080i or 720p.


BTW, what program will convert the .ts to .mkv like the OP asked?


Thanks!
 

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MeGUI is the best tool for this type of conversion. This isn't a single point and click operation at first and you'll need to do a bit of research along with trial and error but once you setup the profiles in MeGUI a few click for each conversion.


You should be aware that the compression from 1080i to 720p x264 take a very long time even on a rather high-end machine. Also, x264 at 720p requires a "mid-range" machine for playback. You might consider using xvid which will compress faster compared to x264 and the decode requirements aren't as high. I tend to leave the AC3 audio as-is and simply mux it but you could downmix to mp3 2ch or something.


You should also look into comskip to identify commericals for removal prior to encoding. This alone takes just under 1/4 of the size off a typical recording once the commericals are actually removed by another tool. I use comskip to generate ZoomPlayer chapter files for single button press skipping of commericals and VideoRedo project files to actually remove the commericals if I'm going to encode them. There is also comcut which you can try to perform the removal blindly based on the comskip results but I haven't attempted this yet.


You also could just download the already encoded shows a site like tvtorrents.com as most shows now have 720p x264 encodes which look really good for the size. The commericals are already cut too. This is grey area but as long the shows aren't pre-air the networks have never made a fuss about it. This is the easiest solution in all honesty.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I tried megui without success. the file it created did not playback properly. maybe i will give it another try. These are movies with ac3 sound.


I have seen bluray movies at 720p on my projector. they look great. These were in an .mkv container using avc (if think). Since these are only 4gb (give or take) in size, i would at least try to convert a .ts and compare orig .ts with 720p converted .ts


Darren
 

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I have been using autogk with a custom MPEG matrix and retaining the AC3 sound. I convert everything to 960x544 and use ffdshow with some post-processing to scale to 720p for playback on a 96x54" screen using a projector. The target profile aims for 4Gb but 2-pass and compression analysis usually brings files in around the 3.5Gb range. It is literally one-click and relatively painless, and 2-pass is pretty fast. If you are willing to expend a few hundred more Mb then xvid+ac3 in AVI works fine. The other advantage is that I can get away with not having to deinterlace the source material.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Wadsworth /forum/post/0


Smaller filesize is what I am looking for. A 500gb hdd can only hold about 40 .ts movies.


Darren

Since 500GB hard drives can be purchased for $100, maybe it's better just to add another HD. Time saved in playing around trying to get the conversion without loss of quality would be better spent elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
True. However, I still would like to try it on one movie. 720p will not display scanlines as some movie scenes with rapid movement in 1080i do now.


Darren
 

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You want compression but without quality loss, taking 1080i down to 720p. Sorry but that isn't going to happen.


Either keep the originals, or be content with resize/deinterlace to 720p using a suitable compressor at a high bitrate at the savings of perhaps a few Gb vs. the expense of time taken to run the encode.
 

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Discussion Starter #14

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kon /forum/post/0


You want compression but without quality loss, taking 1080i down to 720p. Sorry but that isn't going to happen.


Either keep the originals, or be content with resize/deinterlace to 720p using a suitable compressor at a high bitrate at the savings of perhaps a few Gb vs. the expense of time taken to run the encode.

I am not looking for compression. I never mentioned that.

Just a resolution change. 1920x1080i to 1280x720p.


As I mentioned above, I have seen Bluray (1080p) movies converted to 720p that look great. Not quite as good as the 1080p originals, but good.




This is the "general" information I already know. I am looking for the software and or processes that will accomplish this.


Darren
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Wadsworth /forum/post/0


I am not looking for compression. I never mentioned that.

Just a resolution change. 1920x1080i to 1280x720p.


This is the "general" information I already know. I am looking for the software and or processes that will accomplish this.

It is irrelevant if you don't want to compress the content - you are going to have to if you are changing the resolution of the video stream. Many links have been posted with the required tools.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Wadsworth /forum/post/0


I am not looking for compression. I never mentioned that.

Just a resolution change. 1920x1080i to 1280x720p.


As I mentioned above, I have seen Bluray (1080p) movies converted to 720p that look great. Not quite as good as the 1080p originals, but good.




This is the "general" information I already know. I am looking for the software and or processes that will accomplish this.


Darren

Darren,


You can't change the resolution without reencoding. By reencoding, you're going to be introducing additional compression. No way around it. The best thing to do at that point is to reduce compression.


It looks like you want to keep ac3 audio. So reencoding to a mkv container using x264 looks like your best best. This is the process I use for 1080i to 720p for my tv backups.


1. Cut commercials in HDTV2MPEG2. Keep it as a transport stream upon export.

2. Run the TS through ProjectX to correct any irregularites in the stream. Export set to Demux.

3. Run the resulting .m2v through dgindex.

4. Make a avs file using Megui's built in script creator, set output to 720p.

5. Encode video to x264 using Megui.

6. Remux x264 video file with ac3.


Obviously there's alot of setting you can use in the encode process that are available on the web so I'm not gonna get into em. But that's the basic process. I reencode my 42 min video captures to 1100mbs.


Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #18

Quote:
Originally Posted by haubrija /forum/post/0


Darren,


You can't change the resolution without reencoding. By reencoding, you're going to be introducing additional compression. No way around it. The best thing to do at that point is to reduce compression.


It looks like you want to keep ac3 audio. So reencoding to a mkv container using x264 looks like your best best. This is the process I use for 1080i to 720p for my tv backups.


1. Cut commercials in HDTV2MPEG2. Keep it as a transport stream upon export.

2. Run the TS through ProjectX to correct any irregularites in the stream. Export set to Demux.

3. Run the resulting .m2v through dgindex.

4. Make a avs file using Megui's built in script creator, set output to 720p.

5. Encode video to x264 using Megui.

6. Remux x264 video file with ac3.


Obviously there's alot of setting you can use in the encode process that are available on the web so I'm not gonna get into em. But that's the basic process. I reencode my 42 min video captures to 1100mbs.


Hope that helps.

thank you. i have a question about step 3 above. what do you mean exactly "run through" thank you

Darren
 

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lstepnio alluded that encoding x264's takes awhile.


e.g


On a core 2 duo overclocked to 3ghz, you are looking at 12-18 hours to encode a 2 hour 1080i .ts file.


On my P4 3ghz this same operation takes around 40 hours. I've done a few but it takes so long I can't stomach doing them often.


It's really not a simple process either (yet). You need to understand avisynth scripts, IVTC useage, proper cropping, etc.


The whole thing is a can of worms. Don't open it unless you have patience and time.
 
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